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October 10, 1968 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-10

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, October 10, 1968

TRAINING, PRAYING OVER:
15 'M' athletes await Olympics

The Spartans:

These are the facts?

By DIANE DREYFUSS
When riot-torn Mexico City wit-
nesses the lighting of the Olympic
torch on Saturday, Michigan ath-
letes past and present will stand
nervously, but proudly in attend-
ance. Training, hoping, training,
praying, training, and more of
same will be over after fpur years,
and fifteen representatives of the
Maize and Blue will fight for
medals in five areas of competi-
tion.
Two present Ann Arbor resi-
dents double as track stars in the
800-meter event and one alumnus
may spring in the 220. Francie
Kraker, now a junior, fpces stiff
competition from Pila Nikolic of
Yugoslavia and teammates Doris
Brown and Madelaine Manning in
the women's run.
Wolverine track captain Ron
Kutschinski, also taking the se-
mester off from school to run for
the American team, hopes to con-
quer US stars Wade Bell and
Tom Farrell, Wilson Kiprugut of
Kenya and the German D i e t e r
Fromm. Michigan coach D a v e
Martin, who will fly to Mexico City
for the race, predicts "Kutchinski
has a good change of taking a
medal, especially since he has done
better this year than his time in
the Olympic trial finals." Tom
Robinson, a track' institution in
the Bahamas after taking fifth
in Rome and also competing in the
Tokyo Olympics, will attend the
games in some capacity. If he fails
to qualify in the 220 sprint, he will
serve as team manager.
While no US gymnasts f r o m;
Michigan will strive for gold and
silver, two Canadians have earned
the trip to Mexico. On the basis of
his first place finish in the three

trials, former team captain Biglo,
and NCAA champion Gil Larose
will work -in his second Olympics.
A close second in the finals, Sid
Jensen, now a junior at Michigan,
hopes to better his all-around per-
formance in Mexico. While the
Japanese, Russians, and Czechs
may attract most of the interna-
tional attention, Larose and Jen-
sen may have a fierce struggle for
the top spot in Canada.
Michigan sends six swimmers
and divers into international com-
petition, its largest single brigade.
U.S. hopes ride high with Micki
King 'in the women's springboard
diving. A second place finisher in
the California finals, Miss King
received the praise of diving coach
Dick Kimball, who claimed "Micki
has a pretty' good change of be-
ing first, especially since she is a
more dependable diver than the
girl who finished first." The
Americans, Russiansti and East
German Ingrid Kramer should
provide her toughest competition.
Former Michigan captain Carl
Robie will swim in'the 200-meter
butterfly event after placing third
id the US finals. Kimball saw two
potential advantages for the swim-
mer with the most titles in the
butterfly in history: "Robie adap-
ted very well to the high altitude
in Mexico City, where he won the
Little Olympics las year. Besides;
this is his only event, while Mark
Spitz and Fred Ferris will swim
in two-this gives Robie a better
chance and he realizes it's his
last go-around."
Robie should gain extra incen-
tive since the Olympic gold medal
represents the only major butter-
fly title he has never captured.
Not all Wolverine swimmers will

be seeking medals under the ban-
ner of Uncle Sam. Tomas Arusoo,
a junior, will swim the 100- and
200-meter butterfly and possibly
a medley. His teammate from the"
Wolverine team, Bill Mahoney,
will work the 100 and 200 meter
breast stroke and a medley. The
Canadians might cop a medal in
the relays, but Arusoo must com-
pete against Robie and company,
while Mahoney faces a tough Rus-
sian group in the breast stroke.
Juan Bello of Peru may be the
real workhorse of the tankers,
swimming in the 200-meter indiv-
idual, 200-meter freestyle, and all
three relays. Since he won the
US national in the first, he must
be considered a good possibility
as a medal winner.
Alvaro Gaxiola, a former Mich-
igan student, rounds out the
foreign contingent. A 1959 Pan-
American champion, he will tower
dive for Mexico in his third Olym-
pics.
Michigan alumnus John Claw-
son, now in the US army, may face
a rougher battle on the basketball
court. A three year member of the'
Wolverines during the Cazzie Rus-
sell era, the 6'4" guard led the
USA scorers in the recent World
Military Basketball Championship
and will be welcomed, especially
when the underdog Americans face
the favored Russians.
Three competitors in a non-
varsity sport, canoeing, can claim
college ties with Michigan. Alum-
nus John Glair earned a spot
on the US team after winning the
kayak doubles final with Peter
Wiegand of California.
Toby Cooper, a graduate student
in Ann Arbor, will paddle a canoe
for the Americans over the 1,000-
meter course. Finally, another
former US scholar turned athlete,
Sperry Jones Rademacher, will
travel a shorter ,500-meter dis-
tance in her double-bladed kayak.
After the conquering of racial,
climatic, and political problems,
the world might be tempted to
forget the reason for the Mexico
gathering. Hopefully the fifteen
Michigan representatives can aid
the return of world attention to
the purpose and aim of the 19th
Olympiad: friendship and cooper-
ation through sports.
A few medals in this process
would not disturb anyone, though.

A SPARTAN RUNNING BOCK attempts to side-step a tackle by Michigan safety Jerry Hart-
man (26) during the Wolverines' encounter with MSU last year. Cecil Pryor, then a sophomore,
moves in to aid Hartman. Both Hartman and Pryor remember the 34-0 loss to Michigan State a
year ago and will be trying to avenge that outcome this Saturday.

Gri~dde

P ickings

DIVISION STREETERS UNITE! BLOW YOUR HORNS! The
bands have been given a reprieve, and your afternoon naps will be
ruinsi again.
Those of you who don't live within hearing range of Wines
Field are indeed fortunate never to have heard the forces of Ravelli
and Company as they blare forth in musical combat each afternoon
in preparation for the following Saturday's BIG HALF TIME SHOW.
But the Division Streeters know-oy, how they know!
Joint Judic was to have met last night to decide the fate of
these afternoon outrages upon the eardrums, and all of South
Campus was hoping against hope that something would. be done.
Their hopes were dashed, however, when the meeting was never
held, allowing the Noise Boys a week's grace.- i
There remains but one hope: every Division Streeter, and those
on surrounding streets, too, get your own instrument-tuba, organ,
drum, or whatever. Line the walks around Wines and play your
heads off! While you're at it. why not fill out a Gridde Pickings
entry and drop it i6n at 420 Maynard before midnight Friday. Then,
if you win,,you can feast on a Cottage Inn pizza while you're sneer-
ing and blowing.
What fun! What revenge! What noise!

By DIANA ROMANCHUK
OCTOBER 12 -- MICHIGAN STATE
NICKNAME: The Spartans
COLORS: Green and White
COACH: Duffy Daugherty
LAST MEETING: 1967 (MSU 34-9) -
RECORD TO DATE: 3-0 over Syracuse. 14-0
over Baylor. 28-10
over Wisconsin. 39-0
SITE: Ann Arbor (capacity. 103,001)
ODDS ON OUTCOME: UPI and AP, State by 4'2
Bookies, Michigan by 6
NOTABLE FACTS: 21st straight year for sellout crowd
Michigan going for first home win since 1955
State going for fourth straight victory
CAPSULE OUTLOOK
QUARTERBACK: The leader of the Jolly Green Giants is junior
Bill Feraco. Stepping into the shoes left behind by Jimmy Raye,
he is developing into the leading Spartan scorer accounting for
36 points. Basically a short passer, he can on occasion throw 4
the long bomb. Similar in size to Dennis Brown, he can and
often will run the option play, and is presently the second
leading team rusher.
PASS RECEIVERS: Feraco's best reason for passing instead of
running is end Al Brenner. Two weeks ago at Baylor, the 6'2"
senior caught six passes for 153 yards, breaking the single-game
team record set by Gene Washington in 1966. Moreover, like 4
Purdue's Leroy Keyes, he doubles on defense, and played nearly
the entire Baylor game at defensive safety. Flanker Charlie
Wedemeyer (brother of "Hula Hips" Herman) adds variety.
RUNNERS: Definitely a running team, two-thirds of their plays
are on the ground off an "I" formation. Sophomore Tommy
Love is the workhorse at tailback with Dick Berlinski, senior
fullback as primary blocker. Earl Anderson, now healed after a __
cracked rib, backs up Love: while Regis Cavender, who scored
the only 1MSU touchdown in the Poll Bowl two years ago, is
standby at'fullback.'y
OFFENSIVE LINE: Five of the seven linemen are returning letter-
men. Craig Wycinsky and Dave Van Elst have plugged the
graduation holes at both tackle spots. Much improved in the
first three games, they continue to gain confidence!
DEFENSIVE LINE: The bulwark of the Spartan game, it is a blend
of youth and experience. Rich Saul, leading tackler, along with
Charlie Bailey and Don Law form the center of a line which
has allowed opponents only 20 points so far this\ season. 'heir
key objective is to put pressure on the quarterback and will
send six to seven players down on Brown every play.
SPECIALISTS: Berlinski has taken over the punting job from Tom
O'Hearn. Kickoffs, field goals, and extra points are all handled
by left-footed sophomore Gary Boyce, who kicked his first
two field goals (38 and 41 yards) against Wisconsin last week-
end.
INJURIES: Ken Little, one of two victims of twisted knees last
week, will be in his defensive end spot; but it is doubtful that
Nick Jordan will be a starter. Sophomore roverback Gary Par-
mentier returns to the lineup this Saturday after several weeks'
absence for a fractured bone in his leg. Ron Curl and Bill
Lawson, reserve defensive linemen, are also back in good.
health. Frank Traylor and LeMarr Thomas remain sidelined
with injuries suffered in pre-season practice.
QUOTES FROM THE COACHES
DUFFY DAUGHERTY: "Defensively. especially in the secondary,
they (Michigan) are more experienced than we are. They hanW
a great threat in back George Hoey, who is both talented and
dangerous in punt return situations."
BILL DODD ((Michigan scouit): "Michigan State is potentially as
good as last year. There's not the size or strength, but they're
better conditioned. Still they're a young team.
OMEGA PIZZA
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1. Michigan State at MICHIGAN
(pick score)
2. Illinois at Minnesota
3. Indiana at Iowa
4. Northwestern at Notre Dame
5. Purdue at Ohio State
6. Utah State at Wisconsin
7. Kansas at Nebraska
8. Navy vs. Air Force
9. Mississippi at Georgia
10. Tennessee at Georgia Tech

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Wake Forest at Virginia Tech
Oklahoma vs. Texas
Connecticut at Davidson.
Delaware at Buffalo
Princeton at Dartmouth
Auburn at Clemson
Tulsa at Louisville
North Carolina at Maryland
Iowa State at Kansas State
Drexel Tech at Rensselear
Polytechnic Institute

DIONNE WARWICK CONCERT
Ticket Prices: $3.00, $2.00
BLOCK ORDER drawing today
7:00 P.M. in the Union Ballroom
INDIVIDUAL SALES begin Oct. 14
at 9:00 A.M. in the S.A.B. Ticket Booth

Toot

See Arthur Ashe in Action

1

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World's Top Tennis Player,
Graebner to Clash in
Michigan's Events Building
Some of the world's most outstanding tennis talent will
be on display Sunday, Oct. 20, starting at 1:30. Look at
this lineup:
" ARTHUR' ASHE-U.S. National Open and Na-
tional Amateur champion.
* CLARK GRAEBNER-U.S. Davis Cup tea n mern-
ber.
" DONALD DELL-U.S. Davis Cup team captain.
" UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN TENNIS TEAM
MEMBERS.
Jon Haamline and Brian Marcus, two Wolverihe net-
ters, will open the action with a one-set exhibition at 1:30
Then Ashe, also a Davis Cupper, meets Graebner, in
the best two out of three sets. This should be tennis at its
best.
The third match pits Ashe and Graebner against Don-
ald Dell and his younger brother, Dick Dell, also a Mich-
igan varsity player-
There's plenty of parking around the Events Building
and every seat will be a good one for this tennis attraction.
Make plans to attend now. All proceeds are earmarked to
support the U.S. Davis Cup squad fund.
TICKETS ON SALE
Purchase your tickets early at:
-Moe's Sports Shop, 711 N. Univer-
sity
-Stein & Goetz Sports Goods, 315 S.
Main
-Or at the Michigan Athletic Office,
1000 S. State
}Tickets are $2. University students,
faculty and staff can purchase! tickets
for $1. All tickets for children are $1.
This event is sponsored by the Michi-
gan Athletic Deportment.

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1 Item 1.45 1.95 2.35
2 Items 1.75 2.35 2.75

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Arthur Ashe Flashes Form

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Dec. 21, 1968 to Jon. 8, 1969

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