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October 09, 1968 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-09

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Wednesday, October 9, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Wednsda, Ocobe 9, 968THE ICHGAN AIL

--7-T re

CAMPAIGN ROUNDUP:
" HHH proposes summ
with Russia to promc

WASHINGTON OP)-Hubert H.,
* Humphrey said yesterday the
United States and the Soviet
Union have "a special and par-
allel responsibility" for world
peace and he proposed that their
leaders hold regular summit meet-
ings each year.
"If there are to be regular sum-
o mits," the vice president said,
"they must entail common work
for peace," and "must not become
mere vehicles for propaganda nor
*springboards for illusion."
"The nuclear age calls for new
forms of diplomacy,"' said Hum-
phery, "less of ritual, more con-
ducive to frank, informal con-
tacts.
"I propose to make these in-
formal meetings into forums for
new diplomacy, free of the pub-
licity, free of the high expecta-
tions that surround irregular sum-
mit meetings," he said.
* Humphrey's proposal was con-
tained in a broad review of U.S.-
Soviet relations, presented to a
United Press International editors
and publishers conference.
The vice president, calling on
the Soviets to use their influence
with North Vietnam "to start ne-
4 gotiating seriously" at Paris, set
down six essential points for any
Middle East settlement.
He thus filled in another por-
tion of the foreign policy he plans
'n a Humphrey - administration.
Earlier, Humphrey has proposed
strengthening United Nations
peacekeeping machinery, urged
prompt ratification of the nuclear
nonproliferation treaty and the
start of new disarmament talks
and said he considers a bombing
halt over North Vietnam as an
acceptable risk for peace.

George Wallace
'Third party
PL Y
leaders talk.
By The Associated Press
STRATFORD, Conn. - Third
party presidential c a n d i d a t e
George Wallace arrived for a
quick campaign visit to Connecti-
cut yesterday, seeking "the sup-
port of people of all races and
colors in this state."
An enthusiastic crowd of about
2,000 greeted Wallace on his ar-
rival at Bridgeport Municipal Air-
port-where some 200 pickets also
waited in the background.
Wallace did not appear per-,
turbed by the demonstrators and

it meetmins
te peace
drew a laugh from the rest of the
crowd when he said: "Must be a
- barber strike around here."
"If I'm elected they're not going
to use tax money to bus your kids
anywhere you don't want them to
be bused," Wallace said. He said
the U.S. Supreme Court "has made
scond-class citizens out of the
policeman and the fireman."
In Los Angeles, Wallace's run-
ning mate said yesterday he join-
ed the presidential ticket because
Republican 'Richard Njixon plans
to pack his cabinet with "left
wingers."
LeMay, on his first visit to his
home city since becoming former
Alabama Gov. Wallace's vice pres-
idential runningmate, said he
used to think Nixon would "do
what this country needs.
"Then I saw his proposed cab-
inet in which every left wing
member of the Republican Party
was listed" and "began to wonder
what kind of deals Nixon made
with the liberal wing," LeMay
said.
Retired Gen. Curtis LeMay, for-
mer head of the Strategic Air
Command and George Wallace's
vice presidential running mate,!
said yesterday friends make him
privy to inside information at the
Pentagon.
LeMay said that's how he keeps'
up with "the situation" in Viet-
nam.;
"I still have friends in th e1
Pentagon~who give me defense in-t
formation," he told newsmen. He
declined to elaborate, saying "I've
only been in politics since 1 a s t1
Thursday and I'm not quite sure1
of my footing."
At a news conference on hist
first visit home after becoming a
vice presidential candidate, Le-
May said one reason he joined the
Wallace ticket was that Repub-X
lican candidate Richard M. Nix-t
on plans to stack his cabinet witht
"left wingers."

Police battle students
University students clashed with police in Lima, Peru, yesterday, as they attempted to march to
the center of the city in protest of the overthrow of Peruvian President Fernando Belapnde Terry by
a military coup last Thursday.
MEET IN MOSCOW:
CzeChs, Russians to discuss
treaty. legalizing occupation

PRAGUE (P) - Czechoslovakia.
sent a government delegation to
Moscow last night to negotiate a
treaty legalizing the occupation of
this country by some of the Soviet
bloc troops now here, Czechoslovak
informants reported.
The delegations departure ,
there was no official confirmation
- reportedly took place while
First Secretary Alexander Dubcek
and leaders of his Communist
party worked on harsh measures
demanded by Moscow for with-
drawal of some troops.
Prague had agreed to consider

Strike averted
in N.Y. schools;
officials ousted
NEW YORK -)- Rhody McCoy, administrator of the
controversial Ocean Hill-Brownsville school district, was re-
lieved of his post yesterday, as the Board of Education moved
to avoid another citywide teachers strike.
The Board reassigned McCoy to its central headquarters
and also relieved seven of the eight principals in the Negro
and Puerto Rican Ocean Hill district.
Bernard Donovan, superintendent of schools was ordered
to assume direct supervison of 'the Ocean Hill Schools.
The AFL-CIO United Federation of Teachers had threat-
ened a strike of the 1.1-mil- --r--___

WHAT? YOU'VE ONLY SEEN
"THE GRADUATE" ONCE??

ii

ACADEMY AWARD WINNER'
BEST DIRECTOR-MIKE NICHOLS
JOSEPH E. LEVINE
"t~SENTS A
MIKE NICHOLS-LAWRENCE TURMANimoucni
< {} This is Benjamin.
ag He's a little
worried about
his future.
THE GRADUATE 1gO.,SYCU31.,,,
ANMAVCS EMBASUY F ls
MONDAY thru THURSDAY-7:00 & 9:00.
4 - '

_

TONIGHT & EVERY WEDNESDAY at
A HOOT
an evening of endless musical variety
come do your thing and/or sing-a-long

1421 Hilt St.
8:30 P.M.

THURSDAY

/

and sign a treaty that would
cloak the occupation with legality
in Moscow talks between Dubcek
and Soviet leaders.
The informants said the gov-
ernment delegation has 15 mem-
bers, headed by Deputy Premier
Fantisek Hamouz. It reportedly
includes Maj. Gen. Karel Rusov,
'army chief of staff, and various
specialists.
Czechoslovakia's defense min-
ister, Gen. Martin Dzur, had an-
nounced Saturday he is certain
the majority of the Soviet, Polish,
East German, Hungarian and
Bulgarian occupation troops in-
vaded Aug. 20 will be out by Oct.
28 if Soviet conditions are met.
IThe conditions include the
treaty thatdill be under discus-
sion and numerous measures
which Moscow regards as needed
to strengthen the Communist sys-
tem in Czechoslovakia.
Czechoslovak informants have
said the number of troops to re-
main will be at least seven divi-
sions, or about 100,000 men. But
some reports said the number
staying is still up for negotiation
and the Russians may insist on
more.
AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32'Trips Day
Phone 434-0130
6Atuww.Or& CARPENTER ROAD

The 21-member ,party Presidium
gathered in the forenoon. It was
still meeting in the evening. Presi-
dent Ludvik Svoboda, an honorary
Presidium member, was present
for parts of the closed-door ses-
sion.
A communique was expected at
the end of the meeting but this
was not certain. A recess and con-
tinued meetings today were pos-
sible.
The session was attempting to
frame for presentation to the 160-
member party Central Committee
a plan for carrying out the diffi-
cult tasks outlined in the com-
munique issued at the Moscow
talks with Soviet leaders last week
by Dubcek and Premier Oldrich
Cernik.
These included "reinforcing" the
government and party with more
orthodox Communists, tighter
controls over the press and radio,
more outspoken support of the
Soviet bloc, and anti Western for-
eign policy.

lion-pupil public school sys-
tem today or tomorrow after
McCoy banished 80 disputed
white teachers from class-
rooms in his Ocean Hill-
B r o w n s v ill e decehtralized
school district.
The UFT, whose 55,000 mem-
bers are predominantly white, had
accused McCoy and the principals
of "direct defiance of the city and
the Board of Education."
An off-again, on-again UFT
strike previously closed most of
the city's 900 public schools for
11 classroom days since the fall
term began Sept. 9. The walkout
came to an uneasy end Sept. 30.
Donovan told a news conference
McCoy was transferred out of the
district because he had insisted on
obeying the suspended local board
rather than the Board of Educa-
tion. And the superintendent said
the seven principals also had in-
dicated defiance of the 'Board of
Education.,
Over the weekend the Board of
Education had suspended the 19-
member local governing board of
Ocean Hill for its refusal to re-,
turn the 800 ousted teachers to
their regular class assignments.,
Last spring the board ousted a
small group of white teachers, ac-.
cusing them of trying to sabotage
the decentralization experiment. A
trial examiners cleared them, and
the Board of Education ordered
their reinstatement.
Ocean H Ill-Brownsville was
set up as a semiautonomous 'dis-
trict, to test the theory of com-
munity control of schools in ad-
vance of a general decentralization
of the entire system.

Israeis
propose
settlement
UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. 0)1-
Israel advanced yesterday a nine-
point plan for peace with the
Arabs that stressed readiness to
negotiate immediately the issue
of permanent boundaries, but
made clear its intention to retain
the Old City of Jerusalem.
In a policy speech to the 125-
nation General Assembly Abba
Eban, the Israeli foreign minister,
proposed also an international
confTerence _of Middle East cun-
tries to set up a five-year plan for
solution of the Palestine refugee
problem. H said the conference
could be called in advance of
negotiations.
Eban asked further for a non-
aggression pact between Israel and
the Arab states, the setting up of
open frontiers and free navigaton
in the Suez Canal and the Gulf
of Aqaba.
The Arab nations, with support
of the Soviet Union, have been
demanding that Israel 'give, up
Arab territory won in the war of
June 5-10, 1967, as the first prior-
ity in arranging a permanent
peace settlement.
The United States has been
putting its hopes for a settlement
on the private negotiations being
conducted by Gunnar Jarring of
Sweden, the peace envoy of Secre-
tary-General U Thant.
Eban expressed Israel's willing-.
nress "to seek agreement with each
Arab state on secure and reog-
nized boundaries within a frame-
work of peace."
He suggested that "a new effort
be made in the coming weeks to
cooperate with Ambassador Jar-
ring in his task of promoting
agreement on the establishment
of peace."
Smith meets
withWilson
on Rhodesia
LONDON (/P)-Prime Minister
Harold Wilson will meet Prime
Minister Ian Smith of Rhodesia
aboard a British warship moored
at Gibraltar today for talks on
the deadlocked Rhodesian inde-
pendence problem.
. Wilson is flying to Gibraltar
today with Commonwealth Secre-
tary George Thomson and At-
torney General Sir Elwyn Jones.
Wilson and Smith met aboard
the British cruiser Tiger off Gi-
braltar in December 1966 and
reached what appeared to be a
compromise settlement. Smith
backed out of the agreement later,
apparently under political press-
ure from hard-line Conservatives
in his government.
The decision for Wilson to re-
sume negotiations indicated the
British government liad high
hopes of success.

"PROTEST-A LIBERAL VIEW"
SPEAKING Robert W. Carr, Co-founder of the
Washtenaw Democrats for McCarthy
FRIDAY and SATURDAY
BARRY O'NIEL and ROGER RENWICK
returning by popular demand to sing traditional folk music from
Britain, Ireland and Canada, accompanied by guitar, banjo,
dulcimer and concertina.
- -- - - - - - - - - - - -

19 states challenge
GI tax, exemptions

1.

.I

PdRdmOUnT PICTUReS PRsenTs
d DinO De [LUReTIIS PRODUCTIOn

The'Pa per Lion'
is about to
get creamed!
Stuart Millar presents
Starring
AIcr Ada
Technicolor United Artists

WASHINGTON Q)-Connecti-
cut and 19 other states, including
Michigan, appealed yesterday to
the Supreme Court to overthrow
a ruling that would exempt ser-
vicemen from state sales taxes.
Unless overturned, the land-
mark decision by the U.S. Circuit
Court in New York City last July
"will thoroughly disrupt the entire
system of taxation," .said Atty.
Gen. Robert K. Killian of Con-
necticut.
The circuit court, acting on a
case brought by a Navy lieutenant,
held that servicemen, based in a
state away from home are not re-
quired to pay sales and use taxes
of the- host state. This includes
taxes *on cigarettes and gasoline.

The 19 states backing Connec-
ticut said in a separate brief that
the ruling would cut seriously in-
to 'the taxing powers of the states
and the District of Columbia, im-
pairing their revenues "to an in-
calculable extent."
The circuit court relied on the
1942 Soldiers and Sailors Civil
Relief Act, which gave nonresi-
dent servicemen immunity from
state income and personal prop-
erty taxes.
"As a result of the lower court
decision," he said, "Connecticut,,
along with most of the 44 other
states relying on sales and use tax
revenue; will face a loss of essen-
tial revenue and a disproportion-
ate disruption of the orderly ad-
ministration of tax collection."

i

AND...

The SPANISH SOCIETY presents
a lecture by
PROF. JOSE DURAND

SHOWS AT
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:1i0-9:10

NO 2-6264

--Next-
H ELGA

on the 1967 Winner of the
Nobel Prize of Literature:
"Miguel Angel Asturias Entre El Mundo
De Los Mayar y el Arte De Vanguardia
OCTOBER 9,8:00 P.M.
3050 FRIEZE BUILDING

-

11

"HAMLET"

FINAL PERFORMANCES
NOW THRU SUNDAY

I

I

i
i

JOAN PHILIP A'MARCELARMEA
HernminoC-.,-TO43fl3ZZL*
DINO DE LAURENTIIS" beROG[R VADIM -'£A47MLA *w -t elld4
WJEM~Iy LVUTHER wjD'7GEEADKAI'" ~ K1~YD'7' [ Marianne ProuctionlsZ&

"WE DESTROY THESE DRAFT RECORDS NOT
ONLY BECAUSE THEY EXPLOIT OUR YOUNG
MEN, BUT BECAUSE THOSE RECORDS
REPRESENT MISPLACED POWER, CONCENTRATED
IN THE RULING CLASS!"
-From Joint Statement of
Catonsville Nine
Rally in Support of
t gg
Catonsville Nine
NOON TODAY ON THE DIAG

7

f '.,r, UF By
N ir ~Sean

I

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a

III

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