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October 06, 1968 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-06

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

S rnr lr^ t fni ,arr F 14 5

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music
ertesz sparles with Chicago Symphony at Hill

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SHOWS AT
1,3, 5,7,9 P.M

By JIM DULZO
I always look forward to Chi-
cago Symphony concerts with
a special sense of anticipation.
Rumors of an incredible brass
section, Strong woodwinds and
strings, and an extremely tight
ensemble sound whet my musi-
cal appetite to a very high de-
gree. Their reputation can at
times make their concerts al-
most anti-climactic.
This, however, was not the
case last night at Hill Audi-
torium. Inspired by guest con-
ductor Istvan Kertesz, the Chi-
cago delegation turned in a
rousing performance, consist-
ing of works by Hayden, Bartok.
and Dvorak.
The evening commenced with
Hayden's Symphony No. 67-an
unusual work in that it contains
some rather unique orchestra-
- tion for Hayden's time. After
slightly rough, surface treatment
of the first movement, the or-
chestra seemed to find itself
and get down to business. The
second movement showed some
fine musicianship on the part of
-Daily-Richard Lee the first and second violins-
om l h to sca sensitive and elegant in the
"frsomn :teelyhrds olushElyrscal Hayden tradition.
Casn-Af n h-vet-uidn

The third movement, marked
minuetto, featured the use of
a drone technique from the
second violins. This served as a
backdrop for a string trio, con-
sisting of two violins and a cel-
lo. The first chair men played
sensitively, and the overall ef-
fect was quite pleasing. The
work then moved to a close with
an overall warm approach-
perhaps a bit too warm for
Hayden.
Kerstez is Hungarian by, birth
and musical upbringing, and
the program reflected this fact
emphatically. The remaining
portions of the program were
heavily Slavic in nature, and
Kerstesz was in his rightful
realm here. Bela Bartok's The
Miraculous Mandarin Suite ig-
nores the difficulties of the bal-
let's pretentiotis plot and goes
directly to the meat of the mat-
ter-a raw, colorful, and yet
dissonant musical palette, full
of !Hungarian rhythmic and
tonal flavors.
The work, as, do many ballet
suites, suffers from a lack of
visual display to accompany a
rather complicated story line.
Thus, unless under capable
hands, it can easily lag.
Kertesz skirted this hazard by
,giving the work plenty of, drive.
Chicago's excellent string sec-
tion came up with a wealth of
colors, from steely-hard to
lushly lyrical.
Dvorak's Symphony No. 6,
while still in a Slavic vein, de-
mands a very different ap-
proacl: bouncing, syncopated
rhythms contrasted with long,
lyrical, melodic lines. The string
section can really let its hair
down and dig into some very
warm, satisfying passages. Com-
bined with some very good
woodwind work, these two sec-
tions contributed -to what was
to be a very surprising perform-
ance.
The symphony opens with a
very robust allegro, complete
with images of dancing gypsies

and the like-very colorful and
lyrical. Kertsz summoned a very
warm sound from the strings,
and ably contrasted it with
tautly-played passages. The
second movement is full of slavic
romanticism, and the sensitive
approach used contributed nice-
ly to a very balanced presen-
tation.
Bounce was the word in the
scherzo, thanks to some very
tight bowing. Lots of bubbling
ethnic cheer here.
In the final movement, how-
ever, I was at one point quite
convinced that Kertesz had let
things get out of control. The
finale is marked allegro con
spiritio, and I was quite con-
vinced that the orchestra had
used up all of its allegro and
spirito. I senses an"anticlimax
looming on the horizon.
I was quite wrong. In an ex-
hilarating coup d' etat, Ker-
tesz squeezed a rip-roaring coda
out of his group, and it took the
crowd's *breath away. Playing
at a dizzying tempo with deaf-
ening dynamics, the string and
brass sections snatched victory
from the Jaws of defeat in a
surprising realization of what is
an essentially dangerous piece
of music.
The crowd applauded mightily
at the conclusion of the pro-
gram, and it was deserved. Dash
and vigor were the;key words
of the evening, and a lot of it
came from Istvan Kertesz.
NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRES -
FOX VILL915E
375No. MAPLE RD.-769.1300
LAST 3 DAYS
MON.-TUES.-7:10-9:10
SUN.-1:15-3:10-5:05
7:10-9:10
DEAN MARTIN
STELLA STEVENS
AEIWALLAC
ANNE JACKSON.

**** HIGHEST RATING
"AN ARTISTICT ACHIEVEMENT!"
rachel, rachel
is the best written, most seriously acted American movie in
a long time,"
-N.Y. TIMES
rachel, rachel
is a double-barreled triumph! Joanne Woodward is extraord-
inary-and Paul Newman's direction is excellent."
-David Goldman, WCBS Radio
rachekr rachel
is a film of beauty and delicacy. Joanne Woodward must win
an Academ yAward nomination for her superlative per-
f ermance."
-LADIES HOME JOURNAL
in the PAUL NEMANprodu dona
whe
TCHICOLOR'IIOMWAERO10S.-S iR ANIS
LAST DAY TODAY
"Frank" 4:20, 7:00, 9:40-"Drac" 3:00, 5:40, 8:20
M
BORIS!
BELA! r
TOGETHER!
SHOCKING!10
Remember the guy with the funny
things in his neck and the big
feet? And remembear the guy,~
with the long teeth, who was always
thirsty for the red stuff and
afraid of the daylight? Well, they're
both back. Boris Karloff and Bela
Lugosi. "FRANKENSTEIN" and
"DRACULA," in the two original
1930's versions. SO DROP IN,
BORIS & BELA ARE ALWAYS
LOOKING FOR NEW BLOOD.

The concert, held in the but his
Events Building, was obvious- pressions
ly oriented for the bernefit of dexterity.
the middle-agdd enthusiasts. As most
a matter of fact, there were name as
probably justnas many adults
as students in attendance.. It
was. a good thing for Johnny
that they were there, for the
show 'was not very appealing for
a primarily student audience.
The Bud and Cece Dance
Team led outhe concert with
a routine entitled "The History
of .Modern Ballroom Dance."
They started with the Ch arlest-
ton and finished with a con-
glomeration of frug, monkey,
swim, and jerk. Only the older
members of the audience appre-
clated it, because they were the
only ones' who' could remember
back that far. They enjoyed the
g y r a t i o n s , that apparently
brought back many fond
memories.
The highlight of the concert
was Doc Severinson, who un-
fortunately was iin the spotlight
for the shortest time. He ade-
quately displayed his mastery
of the trumpet as he double and
triple-tongued his way through'
"Malaguena" and "La' Maca-
rena." He also drew the most
enthusiastic applause of the
night 'for his rendition of "Go-
in' Out of My Head."
Doe's artistry was sharply
contrasted by the 'next perform-
er, Marilyn Maye who revealed.
her fame for singing the Lin-
coln-Mercury commercial. She
is really not a bad singer, but N
the: audience soon grew tired of
her as she crooned through ten
minutes of an exhaustive med-
ley. She also made such 'obvious
blunders as repeatingea song
done by Bud and. Cece and
"Goin' Out of My Head."
Then-the Star came on, mon-
ologuing to the yuks and guf-
faws. of the younger married
couples who could truly appre-
ciate his jokes about the pill. His
jokes were not terribly funny.
Perhaps it was because many of
his routines were reminiscent of
those we've all heard many
times before. There were the
ones about the lesser known'
airlines, topless restaurants, and!.
TV commercials we'd like to see..
It's hard to laugh at thing ,

where hundreds of students
craned their necks to get a
glimpse of the grey-haired mas-
.ter standing in the press bok.
I would hope that future con-
cert sponsors learned from this
performance the lesson they
should have learned long ago.
This kind of "comedy" just does
not go over before the sophis-
tication of Michigan students.
It never has, and it probably
never will.
We only have one more "arf
arf" concert this semester, Bill
Cosby, and we can only hope
thing§ will pick up this winter.

4

e

9-.
A
5"
SHOWS AT
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:10-9:101
(Feature 10
min. later)

The Paper Lion'
Is abot to
get creamed
Stuart Millar presents
Al Starn
~~~Aida
Technicolor' United Artists
NO 2-6264
-Next-
L MtN

I

LVAI

- i

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-Daily-Eric Pergeaux
"And no*w, here's .

STARTS WEDNESDAY
COLUMBIA PICTURES and
HRIZONPICTURESPenfs
But Lancaster
lThe Swmm' ler
TECHNICOLOR
S uggustd fat Naive Adim&

HELGA

ow

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..

STARTS TOMORROW-7 :00-9:00
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
BEST DIRECTORr-MIKE NICHOLS
JOSEPH E. LEVINE
MIKE NICHOLS-LAWRENCE TURMANIm.tooum
-This isle amin.
He's a little
wo red about
-isfuture.'
AN AVCO EMBASSY FLM
T H E G R A D D A T E AVCO MBSS I EtLM AS
TECHNICOLOR" PANAVISIN
"MACOEMBAS 7ass ouES s

TODAY AT
1, 3, 5, 7, 9 p.m.

"BRILLIANT! Luis Bunuel, a
master of cinematic erotica !
-Saturday Review

announcing
An International Festival of New Film
The First American Showings
Of 26 Short Films from 9 Countries...

"60
"
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in.

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a distinguished series of three programs presenting
the newest achievements in creative cinema,
by the world's most talented film makers.

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among the films to be shown...
" VERSAILLES
by Albert Lamorisse, Paris
" RAKVICKARNA Prague
" DESERTION West Germany
" LA VITA Milan
" MIRACLE Budapest
* SAMADHI -San Francisco
" WHY DID YOU KISS ME
AWAKE? West Germany
" MARIE ET LE CURE Paris
* TONIGHT LET'S ALL MAKE
LOVE IN LONDON
with Michael Caine, The Rolling
Stones, Julie Christie,
Eric Burdon, et al.

I

We 'Don't J'ust'
Publsh a N ewspaper
* We meet new people
" We laugh a lot
* We find consolation
" We have T.G.'s

A Contemporary Approach to OCTOBER 1-13

_

Shakespeare's

Directeed by Ellis Rabb
-4

* We play football

(once)

- We make money (some)
# We solve problems
s We gain prestige
" We become self confident
" We debate vital issues
* We drink 5c Cokes
I *A ®* U a A a mm =

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A A4 A TIC C'T"Tf "% T)TJ f" T'%T T1" r*VTf-%XT '-rT-TT7 A T TT-%T

"The show was extraordinary .. delightful, exhilarating, deeply moving ... Congratulations,
hI. -c fk nn.nlinarc a a rr THE FVFImG STAR. Wasinn.n lC.

I1

I

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