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October 01, 1968 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-01

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Page Tenr

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 U: -_ .

_ - - -

U of M JUDO CLUB
will sta rt Classes'
in the

Baseball

ends; two skippers fired

it

Wrestling

Room of the lM

Building

By The Associated Press r-rack and director of scouting Ray
OAKLAND -Bob Kennedy was Swallow quit and joined the
fired Sunday as manager of the Seattle expansion team. A vice
Oakland A's shortly after the president, Bill Cutler, was fired.
team concluded its best American - -
League baseball season since 1955.! MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL -
He was replaced by Hank Bauer. Calvin Coolidge Ermer was fired
B er,' fired earlier this season yesterday as manager of the
as manager of the Baltimore Minnesota Twins baseball team,
Orioles, was signed in a two-year and Twins president Calvin Grif-
contract by owner Charles Finley. fith said he probably won't an-
Finley, who showed up at the nounce a successor until after the
Oakland Coliseum for the first World Series.
time in more than a month, called "I'll make my mind up before
Kennedy, who had already signed we go to, the baseball expansion
a two-year contract, into his office meeting Oct. 15," Griffith said as
after the game. he became the second American
Then i nley issued a statement League administrator to fire his
nn Then-Fnley ss R uedataentmanager in two days.

since they moved here in 1961. be beneficial to the club.'
Ermer took over for Sam Mele in Former Twins Coach Billy Mar-
June, 1967 and guided the Twins tin has been mentioned prori-
to within one game of the Ameri- nently as the next Twins man-
can League pennant. ager. Griffith said, "I haven't
"It's become quite apparent to talked to Martin but I have asged
me that Ermer has lacked a firm him to come in here after the
control over the ball club," said World Series."
Griffith, "therefore, I've decided Martin managed the Twins'
that a change in leadership would Denver entry this season in the
Pacific Coast League.
r* * *
Major League Battimg champs
Standings By The Associated Press'
Pete Rose of Cincinnati edged

Tuesday, October 1, 1968
Sports Beat S. orts Beat Sports Beat
By Da id.IWei I
The rebirth of sport:
A spiritual history
It was another one of those drowsy, sun-drenched
days at the baseball stadium. The crowd was spotty. One
typically-inebriated airplane was growling irrespon-
sibly' across the sky above the stands.
Throughout the land, millions of dead-eyed TV
viewers dozed lazily in their armchairs, waking only
occasionally to acknowledge a strike or a walk or a
ground out.
The pace of the contest started slowly and gradually
deteriorated as the end of the first inning approached.
Never had a game dragged like this one - it was clearly
the epitome of modern-day baseball.
It was a scoreless deadlock; a hopeless blank on the
television screen, the scoreboard, and the field.
Somehow, though, the game managed to drag on.
The sixth frame came and went. Still there were
no runs. And even less excitement. Time plodded along

t.

at 7:30 P.M.

Thur s, Oct.3
Newcomers and experienced players
are welcome.

saying Kennedy, 4u, nha peen re-
lieved of his duties after an 82-80 Ermer's firing came one day
record in his first and only season after the Twins finished in sev-
as manager.i enth place, 24 games behind the
s aem a ipennant-winningaDetroit Tigers.
The s aement also saidKen- It is the Twins' worst finish
nedy. had been offered "a position I steTiswrtfns
with the organization." -.
Finley bought the Athletics in
the fall of 1960 and has since had * 3
six managers, including Bauer,
who took over for Joe Gordon
late in 1961 and served al of:,: ;:
1962.
Kennedy t h u s became the The Advisory Committee on
fourth Athletics' official to leave Recreation, Intramurals, and
this year. Farm director Bill Par- Club Sports will hold an open

I' E

ENGINEERS

MASS

MEEIG

FOR
ENGINEERI NG COUN CI
THURSDAY, OCT. 3rd, 7 P.M.
Michigan Union Rms. K,L,M,N, 3rd Floor
SPONSORED BY U.M.E.C.

meeting tonight at 7:30 p.m. in
the Student Government Coun-
cil Chambers on the third floor
of the S.A.B. All students, fa-
culty, and any other interested
persons are invited.
The Michigan Ice Rink (the
Colesium) is now open. Pub-i
lic skating is scheduled f o r
Monday - Thursday, 1-3 p.m.;
and Monday - Saturday, 8-9:45,
p.m.
Rates are 50 cents for Mich-
igan students and high school
and grade school children, 75
cents for university faculty and
staff, and $1 for the general
public. Skates can also be rent-
ed for 50 cents.
MISTER( )
FAMILY RESTAURANT
" HAMBURGERS TREASURE CHEST
CHICKEN CU1CMN
CONEYISLANDS
I"JUMBOYSSMLN
SPEEDY jSERVICE
CARRY-OUT SPECIALISTS
NO WAITING-PLENTY
of PARKING
INSIDE SEATING, OR
t EAT IN YOUR CAR
OPEN 11 AM DAILY
662-0022
3325 WASHTENAW RD.
ANN ARBOR
2 BLKS.W. of ARBORLAND

FINAL STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE
/W L Pct. GAl
Detroit 103 59 .636 -
Baltimore 91 71 .562 12
Cleveland 86 75 .534 16f,
Boston 86 76 .531 17
New York 83 79 .512 20
Oakland 82 80 .506 21
Minnesota 79 83 .488 24
California 67 95 .414 36
Chicago 67 95 .414 36
Washington 65 96 .404 371,
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
New York 4, Boston 3
Washington 2, Detroit 1r
Oakland 7, Minnesota 1
California 1, Chicago 0
Only games scheduled.
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Regular Season Ends
New York 4, Boston 3
Washington 3, Detroit 2
Chicago 7, California 6
Minnesota 4, Oakland 3
Only games'scheduled.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
St. Louis 97 -65 .599 -
San Francisco. 88 74 .543 9
Chicago 84 78 .519 13
Cincinnati 83 79 .512 14
Atlahta 81 81 .500 16
Pittsburgh 80 82 A494 17
Los Angeles . 76 86.469 21
Philadelphia 76 86 .469 21
New York 73 89 .451 24
Houston 72 90 .444, 25
SATURDAY'S RESULTS
New York 3, Philadelphia 1
Houston 3, St. Louis 2
San Francisco 10, Cincinniati 4
Chicago 4, Pittsburgh3
Los Angeles 4, Atlanta 2
SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Regular Season Ends
Philadelphia 10, New York 3
St. Louis 11, Houston 1
Cincinnati 3, San Francisco 0
Chicago 5, Pittsburgh 4
Atlanta 2, Los Angeles 1

honor for the first t i m e since
1938.
Around the first of September,
Rose was -sitting on a somewhat
comfortable cushion for the title
- around 10 points over Alou.
But he went into a slump, getting
14 hits for 64 at bats in one span,
and held only a fraction of a
point lead over Alou entering Sat-
urday's game. Rose connected for
five hits in five at bats, and Alou
went 4-4.
Carl Yastrzemski of Boston was
in no danger of losing his Ameri-
can Leagud batting lead, but he
almost became the first player to
win a batting crown with an aver-
age of less than .300.
Yastrzemski went 0-5 in Bos-
ton's loss to the New York Yank-
ees and finished with an unoffi-
cial winning mark of .301, the low-
est winning mark ever. The prev-
ious low was .306 by Elmer Flick
of Cleveland in 1905.
All the figures are unofficial
until confirmed by the leagues.

out Pittsburgh's Matty Alou and
claimed t h e unofficial National.
League b a t t i n g championship
Sunday, while Carl Yastrzemski!
took the unofficial American Lea-,
gue title with the lowest winning
~average in history --.301.
"Rose crackeda double in three
at bats in Cincinnati's 3-0 victory
over San Francisco Sunday as he
shook a late slump and edged Alou
in a furious finish for the title.
He ended up with a "335 mark
una gv 1,uex, 'unA . + u hoio

4
*

ii

VOICE MEETING,
Tuesday, October 1.
Union Assembly Hall
7:30.P.M.
We will discuss Voice programs'
and organizationj

"Jugs"backpeddles into history
so slowly, as lengthening shadows extended their cool-
ness over the stadium confines.
Then, in the top of the (lucky)' seventh, something
happened. "Jugs" Doodles, the shortstop with the name
everybody had long-since ceased to comment\ on,
dropped back under a lofty pop-up.
Backstepping at a rather smart pace, Doodles be-
came entangled in his cleets and tumbled nose-over-toe
to the turf. Popping back up immediately, and pausing
,to doff his cap to an' appreciative and newly-awakened,
clientele, "Jugs" snapped off the projectile in its down-
ward arc and smacked his tightly-clenched fist into his
empty mitt.
The ball, it seemed, had become lodged in Doodles'
rather prominent left ear.
Baseball, it might be noted, was never again quite
the same.

E' --

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