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October 01, 1968 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-10-01

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Tuesday, October 1, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Paae Nine

i 0 i;Tesdaty, Octber 1 1968THE MCHIGA DA.L

%ri. y -- \ 1 1

fi ,

WEEKEND LEFTOVERS
Big Ten menu lists 'boiled'

Irish'

Purdue maintains top spot;
Notre Dame slips to fifth

Ii

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I

By JOE MARKER
Purdue, figured by many ex-
perts the best college football
team in the nation this year, con-
firmed that judgment Saturday
afternoon with a 37-22 bombard-
ment of arch-rival Notre Dame..
The Fighting Irish - came into
the game as the nation's second-
ranked team, right behind Pur-
due, but left their home field
licking the wounds inflicted by a
well-balanced Boilermaker at-
tack and a clutch defense.
The game was decided in the
second quarter when Purdue blit-
zed the Irish for three touchdowns
within four minutes.
Notre Dame was leading 7-3
with less than six minutes left in
tthe half, when Mr. Everything,
Leroy Keyes, went to work. He
threaded his way 16 yards through
the right side of the Notre Dame
defense to score the go-ahead
touchdown.
Following the interception of an
errant Terry Hanratty pass,
Keyes, while rolling out' to his
. left on an option play, passed 17,
yards to Bob Dillngham for ano-
ther score. Tp coi plete the first-
half blitz, Dillingham took, a 16-
yard touchdown aerial from quar-
terback Mike Phipps following a

ALd BRENNER
recovered Notre Dame fumble,
and for all practical purposes the
ball game was over.
The importance of Keyes in the
victory was, as usual, vital. All he
did was rushrfor 99 yards and two
touchdowns, pass" for one .tbueh-
dlown, and defense Jim Seymour
when Notre Dame threatened to
score.

Southern California, ranked
number three, crushed its second,
straight Big Ten opponent with
O. J. Simpson turning in another
spectacular performance. This
time the victim was Northwestern
by a score of 24-7.
USC, unlike its come-from-be-
hind victory over Minnesota last
week, decided this affair in the
first half, piling up a 17-0 lead.
The score might have been
worse except for the fact that
Simpson sat out much of the
second quarter. O. J. rushed for
189 yards and three touchdowns
and has now scored seven times in
two games, the entire Southern
Cal, output.
Minnesota dropped its second
straight heartbreaker to a na-
tionally-ranked team, losing 11-
14 to ninth-ranked Nebraska on
a field goal by Paul Rogers with
only 11/2 minutes left. The Goph-
ers entered the last quarter lead-
ing 14-7, but Nebraska parlayed
two intercepted Ray Stephens'
passesinto a touchdown and the
decisive field goal.
Duff y Daugherty's eager Michi-
gan State Spartans turned in
their second straight impressive
performance, crushing Baylor in
the second half en route to a 28-
10 triumph. State held a slim,7-3
halftime lead, thanks to an 83-
yard pass from Bill Feraco to Al
Brenner, but erupted for t h ,r e e
touchdowns in the second half to
ice the victory.
A relatively slim crowd of 73,-
855 at Columbus watched O h i o
State overcome a Southern Meth-
odist aerial circus and score a 35-
14 triumph. SMU put the ball in
the air 76 times, completing 40
for 437 yards, but were repeated-
ly stymied in Buckeye territory by
interceptions and fumbles (five
and three respectively).
Woody Hayes' charges ground
out 227 yards of their own, but two
of their scores came on passes
from sophomore quarterback Rex
Kern.
Washington raced to a 21-0 lead
and then had to stave off a Wis-
consin second-half rally to escape
with a 21-17 victory. The loss was
Wisconsin's seventh in a row, ty-
ing the school record.

After two quick touchdowns by
Washington's Harvey Blanks in
the, third quarter, Wisconsin
stormed back with an 80-yard,
drive of their own to score. The
Badgers then took advantage of
two Washington fumbles for ten
more points. However, Al Worley
intercepted his second pass of the
game at the Washington' 34 to end
the Badgers' upset hopes,
With the exception of Michi-
gan, the other Big Ten teams all
mnet unfortunate, ends. -
Kansas piled up 388 yards rush-
ing to overpower Indiana, 38-20.
Don Shanklin was the 'hero for
Kansas, scoring three touchdowns!
on runs of 54 and 65 and a punt
return of 59 yards.
Illinois wasybombed for the
second time by a Big Eight foe ,as
Missouri exploded for five touch-
downs in the second half and a
44-0 'victory. Coach Dan Devine's
team now has amassed a 7-1-1 re-
cord against Big Ten competition
since 1958.
Iowa dropped a 28-17 decision to
Texas Christian after leading at
halftime 14-7, ending its modest
one-game win streak. The Hawk-
eyes have the privilege of meeting
an enraged Notre Dame eleven
this Saturday.

The Purdue Boilermakers in-
creased their lead in The Associa-
ted Press' college football p o11
yesterday.
The powerful Boilermakers, who
trounced Notre Dame 37-22 in
the Big Showdowin last Saturday
were named first on all but thre
of 45 ballots in amassing 894
points.
Southern California edged up a
notch into second place, while
Notre Dame tumbled from second
to fifth. Penn Stae is third and
Florida fourth, both up one place
from a week ago.
And, the shakeup wasn't con-
fined to the top teams. Georgia
and Texas A & M moved back in-
to the ratings after dropping out
last week, while three others -
California, Michigan State a n d
Arkansas-ngade the Top 20 for
the first tire.
Southern California, 2-0 after
a 24-7 breeze past Northwestern,
received only two top votes, but
the Trojans were named second
on 37 ballots in rolling up 797
points.
Penn State, which made Kansas
State its second straight victim
25-9, had 568 points and Florida
a 9-3 conqueror of arch-riva
Florida State, had 441.
Ohio State leaped all the way
from 11th to sixth with a 34-14

1

victory over Southern Methodist
in its opener, and Nebraska, 3-0,
moved from ninth to seventh af-
ter beating Minnesota 17-14, a

-1
i

PRESIDENT and MRS. FLEMING

deleatn tat knocked the Gophers, I
17th last week, out of the rank-
ings. cordially invite the faculty and students
The top 20, with first-place votes re-I
4 cords and total points awarded for first of the Univrslty of Michigan
15 picks on basis of 20-18-16-14-12-10-9 0
a -7-6-5-4-2-2-1 0dO et hi
8-i-6--4-'2'2-1:to anOpe n House at their, horseIi
1. Purdue (42) 2-0 894
2. Southern California (2) 2--0, 79
3 Penn State (1) 2-0 568
4. Florida 2-6 441 I TODAY I;~
5: Notre Dame 1-1 430
6. Ohio State 1-0l 3981 oa u ni a lc
7Nebraska 3-0 fl 395 1 I I fro orutlIi 'lc
8. Kansas 2-0 393
9. UCLA 2-0 342
10 Louisiana State 2-- 0 213
- 1 Alabama '2-0 196 , 815 South University Avenue
t 12. Houston 1-4- 163
13. Miami, Fla. 2-0 152
14 Arizona State-2--0 104
15. Tennessee 1-f--1100f
r 16. Georgia 1--0--1 64 --
17. Texas A&M 1-1 4
r 18. California 2--0 43
19. Michigan State 2--0) 39-----
i20. Arkansas 2-fl 37
tiyOthers receiving votes, listed ,alpha- ,Ji You! r .D N o w -
Ibetically: {Air Force, Boston College, \,, ,}Y
7 Indiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Mis-
souri, North Carolina State, North V
Texas State Olio University, Okla-
1 case, Texas, Texas Teeh, Toledo, Vir-
ginia Tech, West Virginia, Yale.
ii'Joit JdicaryCouci
I
Jo of U CV 0
Pick up Petitions
outside SGC office
1st floor SAB
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 2, 1968

V

Professional Standings

NATIONAL LEAGUE

AMERICAN LEAGUE
Eastern Division

COME IN AND ENJOY YOURSELF!
OPEN ALL WEEK 3 P.M.-2 A.M.
SERVING DINNERS FROM 3 P.M.-1 A.M.

Dallas
New York
Washingtol
Philadelphi

Eastern Conference
Capitol Division
W: L T Pct. PF
3 0 0 1.000 132
3 0 0 1.00116
ain 1 a2 0 .333 76
ia 0 3 00 .000 517.

PA
33
66
113
10 9

New York
Boston
Houston
Buffalo
Miami
w
Oakland
San Diego
Kansas City
Cincinnati
Denver

W
2
2
'1
1
0

'L
1
1
3
3-
3

T
0
0
0
0

Pct.
.667
.667
.250
.250
.000

PF PA
102, 87,
67 71
74 90
73 133
34 119

Century Division
New Orleans. 1; 2 0 .333
Cleveland 1 2 0 .333
St. Louis 1 2 ,0 .333
Pittsburgh 0 3 0; .000
Western Conference
Coastal Division
Los Angeles 3 0 0 j1.000
Baltimore, 3 0 0 1.000
San Francisco 2 1 0 .667
Atlanta 0 3 0 .000
Central Division
Minnesota 2 1 0 .667
Detroit_ 2 1l 0 .667)
Green Bay 1 2 0 .333
Chicago 1 2 0 .333

I

67 62
37 62
51 79
37 120
93 29
96 37
73 57
40 103

Western Division
3 0 0 1.000
3 0 0 1.000
3 1 0 .750
2 2 0 .500
0'3 0 .000

FINE
FOOD
ENTERTAIN-
MENT,

119
90
127
81
29

42
37
46
93
78

314 S. Fourth Ave.
761-3548

Saturday's Results
Kansas City 48, Miami 3
Sunday's Results
Boston 20, Denver 17
Buffalo 37, New York 35
Sai Diego 31, Cincinnati 10
Oakland 24, Houston 15
Saturday's Games
Kansas City at Buffalo
San Diego at New York
Sunday's Games
Boston at Oakland
Cincinnati at Denver
Miami at Houston

goY; r t or-

90
60
55

47
76
72
97

Bethlehem Stee
Loop Course Interviews:

Sunday's Results
San Francisco 28, Atlanta 13
Baltinrore 41,, Pittsburgh 7
Chicago 27, Minnesota 17
Dallas 45, Philadelphia 13
Detroit 23, Green Bay 17
Los Angeles 24, Cleveland 6
St. Louis.21, New Orleans 20
New York 48, Washington 21
Saturday's Game
Pittsburgh at Cleveland, night
Sunday's Games
Chicago at Baltimore
' Dallas at. St. Louis
Green Bay at Atlanta
Minnesota at Detroit
New Orleans a New York
Philadelphia at Washington
San Francisco at Los Angeles

II .1

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with bachelors' or advanced degrees.
The course starts early in July with four weeks of
Pa. Loopers attend lectures on every phase of the c
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OCTOBER

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Steel Plant Loopers, who comprise a majority of the average loop class of 150 to 200 graduates,
proceed to various plants where they go through a brief orientation programh before beginning
their on-the-job training assignments. Within a short time after joining the course, most loopers
are ready for assignments aimed toward higher levels of management.
How about other loopers? Our Sales Department loopers (30 or so) remixain at the home office for
about a year of training Most are then assigned to district offices where they take over established
accounts.
Fabricated Steel Construction loopers are trained in a drafting room, on a field erection project,
in a fabricating shop, and in an engineering office. A looper's first work assignment is based on
interests and aptitudes disclosed during this program.
Loopers in Accounting, Shipbuilding, Mining, Research, Traffic, Purchasing, Finance and Law,
General Services, and Industrial and Public Relations go through training programs tailored to
their types of work.
Where would YOU fit in? Check your degree or the one most similar to it.

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combustion departments. Supervision of production oper-
ations. Marine engineering assignments in Shipbuilding
Department. Also: Sales or Research.
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING - Metallurgical
departments of steel plants and manufacturing operations.
Engineering and service divisions. Technical and super-
visory positions in steelmaking departments and rolling
mills. Also: Research or Sales.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERS-Technical and supervisory
positions in coke works, including production of byprod-,
uct chemicals. Fuel and combustion departments, includ-
ing responsibility for operation and maintenance of air
and water pollution control equipment. Engineering and
metallurgical departments. Steelmaking operations. Also:
Research or Sales.
INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING -Positions in steel
plants, fabricating works, shipyards, and mines. Engi-
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CIVIL ENGINEERING: Fabricated Steel Construction
assignments in engineering, field erection, or works man-
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ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING-Steel plant, fabricat-
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Technical and supervisory positions in large production
operations involving sophisticated electrical and elec-
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MINING ENGINEERING - Our Mining Department.
operates coal and iron ore mining operations and limhe-
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offers unlimited opportunities to mining engineers. Also:
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NAVAL ARCHITECTS AND MARINE ENGINEERS:
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Also: Traffic.
OTHER TECHNICAL DEGREES-Every year we re-
cruit loopers with technical degrees other than those listed
above. Seniors enrolled in such curricula are encouraged
to sign up for an interview.
ACCOUNTANTS-Graduates in accounting or business
administration (24 hours of accounting are preferred) are
recruited for training for supervisory assignments in our
3,000-man Accounting Department.
OTHER NON-TECHNICAL DEGREES - Graduates
with degrees in liberal arts, business, and the humanities
are invited to discuss opportunities in the Sales Depart-
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