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September 24, 1968 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-24

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24, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

P~age seven

The Truckin'
Bob Lees-
I'm a fair guy.
I mean, I was as sick as the rest of the press box spectators
Saturday when the Michigan football squad melted before my eyes.
But after awhile I began to notice a few bright spots; and, after
deciding I didn't have sunstroke after all, I decided to look a little9
closer..
The most obvious improvement over last year ws the'
kicking. Every time you looked out on the field, there was Markl
Werner punting, so you know he had a lot of practice. Even so,a
all of his ten punts had that Donny Anderson look about them-
long, high floaters. If the stadium had been domed, he would havet
hit the roof.r
All in all, only four of his near-40-yarders were returned at all--j
for a grand total of 15 yards. Most of the time Cal's runback artists,y
Paul Williams and Bob Darby, could be seen at a dead run-back-
wards-with their hands in the air for a fair catcth. Only these long
drives kept the Wolverine defense out of several big holes.
Yet the offense was absolutely /stalled through the first period,
as the left,side of the Bear line, led by highly-regarded Ed White,
was in the Michigan backfield as often as Bump Elliott's messenger
boys. But the second period saw a reversal of this, as the Wolverine
offensive line began to hold its own.
A large share of this turnabout can be credited to Stan Broadnax.
He, along with Dan Dierdorf, had the job of blocking out those
Berkeley leftists, and from the second period on White saw much of
the game through the grassblades: In fact, the Wolverins really
moved the ball (though interceptions hurt) until Broadnax was
removed in the fourth quarter due to heat exhaustion.
"The middle of the defensive line, meanwhile, was successfully
bombarded through much of the game. The obvious reason, from
the fan's point of view, was that Cal found this an easy access
route to the goal posts. But the hidden reason for that reason
was the fact that they didn't run well around the ends.
On the left side stood Phil Seymour, who made 17 tackles, 15 of
them solo jobs. On the right side were John Kramer, who was in-
jured in the first quarter, and Jim Wilhite. All told, they held all
Cal runners who came their way to a net of less than three yards
per carry.
. Wolverine runners, though, didn't do too much better. The entire
Michigan ground attack totaled 99 yards, with Ron Johnson held to
48 of them..But there, too, a brightness shone through the dismal
showing-in the unlikely 'form of, fullback Garvie Craw.
Along with Johnson, Cre'w turned in his usual fantastic blocking
job; but he also performed the unusual, for him, by gaining 30 yards
in six attempts.
When it comes to the defense backfield, even the most pessi-
mistic; writers about the game found little to cmplain about.
Brian Healy and Tom Curtis turned in good perfornances on their
side, 4s did George Hoey and Bob Wedge on the right. Unfor-
tunately, Wedge's greatest moment-an interception in the: third
period-was marred by his attempted lateral--and resultant
fumble-in the general direction of Healy.
Curtis' interception in the second period, meanwhile, set the stage
for Michigan short-lived comeback. Cal had penetrated deep into
Wolverine territory, and quarterback Randy Humphries lifted a long
bomb-only to find the Wolverine safety waiting to gather it in.
Werner then punted Michigan out of danger.
The game proved to be a costly one, injurywise, for the Blue
squad, as halfback Dave Farabee and defensive left tackle Tom Goss
joined Kramer on the bandage parade. Farabee, injury-prone through-
out pre-season practice, broke his left arm and is lost for /the season,
while Kramer, who hobbled around on crutches all weekend as the
result of his knee injury, may have to undergo surgery. The senior
end will miss much of the .season, while Goss, who suffered a hip
bruise, has a 50-50 chance of starting against Duke.
In any event, it will be a much grimmer Wolverine squad that
takes the field Saturday in Durham. They'll be used to hot weather,
for one, and they'll realize that they can't depend on last year's bright
spots all the time. But several new ones presented themselves Satur-
day, and the entire squad may' benefit from the variety they showed.
Oh, yes, one more bright spot: so far, the Wolverines are
batting 1.000 in points after touchdown. I

Whoop S! McLain tumbles

Gridde Pickings
This is the story of the Princess and the Pea.

l

BALTIMORE (/P) - The Balti-
more Orioles, only team to hold
an edge on Dennis McLain this
season, whipped Detroit's 31-game
winner 2-1 last night. as reliever
Pete Richert squelched a patented
Tiger comeback in the eighth!
inning.
The Orioles, who need one more
victory to clinch second place be-
hind the American League cham-
pion Tigers, finished . their 1968
action against McLain with a 3-2
record-accounting for half of his
defeats.
Before being removed for a
pinch hitter in the eighth, McLain
struck out four to become Detroit's
all-time season strikeout leader
with 276, one more than Hal New-!
houser, fanned in 1946.
Thfe Tigers, who have won 39
games:in which they have been
tied or were behind in the seventh
inning or later, almost pulled out
another one-as they did when
McLain won his 30th.
Baltimore rookie Roger Nelson
working on a three-hitter through
seven, was removed after Don,
Wert and pinch hitter Eddie
Mathews singled in the eighth.
Richert struck out Dick McAu-'
liffe, but Detroit scored when sec-
Funeral drumsI
sound for the
soccer lea gue
DETROIT (P)-Officials of the
Detroit Cougars of the North
American S o c c e r League an-
nounced yesterday their decision
to disband because of financial
losses.
"We had been prepared to incur
substantial losses for at least a
five-year period, but the actual
losses have been so far in excess
of our pessimistic projections, with
no real indication of significant
improvement, that we simply
could not feel justified in carry-
ing on," said John W. Anderson
II, president of the Cougars.
"We had hoped for a mininum
average paid attendance of 5,000
to 6,000 per game," Anderson ex-
plained. "The actual average was
less than 1,500."
He said the relatively poor fin-,
ish of the Cougars during the
1968 season was not a factor in
the decision.

ond baseman Dave Johnson drop-
ped a throw for an error on
Mickey Stanley's grounder. Rich-
ert then got Jim Northrup on a
grounder and, after walking Al
Kaline intentionally, to load the
bases, retired Norm Cash on an
infield out.
McLain, who had a six-game
winning streak snapped, allowed
five hits and one of the Baltimore
runs was unearned.
The 24-year-old right-hander,
OTHERS FAIR:

first hurler to win 31 since Lefty
Grove in 1931, failed in a bid to
become the first 32-game winner
since Grover Cleveland Alexander,
in 1916.1
Boog Powell's two-out single in
the first inning scored Mike Fiore,
who had reached second base on
shortstop Stanley's throwing error
on an attempted double play. A
walk, a sacrifice, and Don Bu-
ford's bloop single made it 2-0 in
the seventh.

dailly
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ANDY BARBAS

Once upon a time, in a far off enchanted kingdom where nobody
ever died and everything was warm, there lived a handsome prince,
by the name of Pool. (Perhaps I should add that Pool was a popular
name of the time, not unlike "Bob" or "Pete" is now.)
Pool was looking for a beautiful princess to cheer him up, because
although he cheered everybody else up, nobody cheered him up.
So he made a great big pile of mattresses and put a pea under it.
His reasoning was this: if a real princess stops by, she will sleep lousy
because of the pea.
Just then a knock came at the door.
"Hello," said a winsome lass, barely out of college. "I want to
sleep here tonight and I'm a princess."
So she slept there on the pile of mattresses, because the prince
wanted to see if she was the real McCoy.
In the middle of the night, the princess woke up because of a
sudden noise, hit her head on the rafter, and spent the rest of her
life thinking she was Rory Calhoun.
In other action, Gridde Pickings announces its first winner to be
Ray Berch of Bursley Hall here at Michigan.
Enter this contest by Friday .at midnight, only one entry per
person you cheaters, and you'll get toswin a neat Cottage Inn pizza,
complete with carrying case. As we said before, there's no money in
Africa.
1. MICHIGAN at Duke (pick score) 11. West Virginia at Pittsburgh
2. Iowa at Texas Christian 12. Miami of Fla. at Georgia Tech
3. Missouri at Illinois 13. NC State at Oklahoma
4. Indiana at Kansas 14. Texas el Paso at Arizona State
5. Baylor at Michigan State 15. Florida at Florida State
6. Nebraska at Minnesota 16. 'texas at Texas Tech
7. Southern Cal at Northwestern 17. Ohio University at Kent State
8. Purdue ut Notre Dame 18. Virginia Military at Virgina
9. SMU at Ohio State 19. Lehigh at the Citadel
10. Washington at Wisconsin 20. St. Norbert at River Falls

g es
Big1 Tn favorites impIressive

By JOE MARKER
The annual fall phenomenon
known as Big Ten football, much
maligned in recent years for its
low percentages against outside
competition, is supposed to stage
an upsurge in 1968. However,
events on the gridiron last Satur-
day did nothing to salve the
wounded pride of the conference.
The favorites in the title chase
remained unscathed, and except
for Michigan State and Iowa, the'
also-rans did little to indicate im-
provement.
Conference favorites Purdue
and Minnesota staged impressive
performances, even though the
latter lost a heartbreaker, while
Ohio State awaits its opener.
At Lafayette, Indiana, Leroy
Keyes picked up where he left off
last year, and helped pass and
run Purdue to a 44-6 victory over
a lackluster Virginia team. He
ran for 62 yards, passed for 51
more, and for good measure
caught eight passes for nearly a
hundred yards.
Quarterback Mike Phipps rid-
dled the Virginia secondary for
230 yards passing in a tuneup for
this week's clash with Notre
Dame.
A disturbing fact for Coach
Jack Mollenkopf is that Virginia
pounded the Boilermaker line for
182 yards rushing.
It took another fabulous per-
formance by 0. J. Simpson to
carry defending national champ-
ion South California to a
come-from-behind 29-20 victory
over an aggressive' Minnesota
team.-
Minnesota established itself as
a team to ,be reckoned with in

the Big Ten, as they forced the
heavily-favored Trojans to the
brink of defeat. . k
The Gophers took the lead 20-
16 midway in the fourth quarter
as George Kemp and John Win-
termute combined on an 83-yard
kickoff return.
Then, to the disappointment of
the near sellout crowd of 60,280 in
Minneapolis, Simpson struck for
his third and fourth touchdowns
of the game in the final four min-
utes.
He carried the ball six times in
USC's drive for the winning
touchdown, sweeping the right
end for the final seven yards. All
told, Simpson gained 367 yards,
236 on rushing alone.
The Iowa Hawkeyes provided
one of the big upsets of the young
campaign when they dumped!
highly-regarded Oregon State, 21-!
20. Iowa had been figured to pro-i
vide a doormat for the other Big
Ten teams again this year, but
maybe they have come of age.
The sophdmore-d o m i n a t e d
Hawkeyes forced the Beavers into'
three fumbles and an intercepted
pass in the last' quarter alone to.
help, preserve the victory.
Although Oregon State ran for
309 yards, the Iowa defense was
tough when backed into its own
territory.
Indiana, another title co-favor-
ite has unexpected trouble from a
supposedly weak Baylor team, ands
had to travel 80 yards in the last
four minutes for a wild 40-36 vic-
tory,' with Harry Gonso scoring
with only 18 seconds left on the
clock.
The game marked the continua-
tion of Indiana's hair-raising fin-
ishes of last year.
It is apparent that coach
Johnny Pont will have to shore up
his defense for this week's clash
with Kansas,rwhich demolished
Illinois 47-7.
Kansas erupted with 20 points
in the second quarter after a
scoreless first stanza, and added
four more touchdowns in t h e
second half, the last two coming

on an intercepted pass and a
recovered fumble.
The Jayhawks shredded t h e
Illini defense for over 500 yards,
including 152 on kickoffs and re-
turns.
Duffy Daugherty's Michigan
State Spartans apparently enjoy-
ed the television exposure as they
upset a strong Syracuse team in
East Lansing, 14-10.
MSU twice came from behind,
with quarterback Bill Feraco put-
ting them ahead to stay with an
eight yard touchdown gallop in
the final quarter.'
Wisconsin traveled to Arizona
State for a game Saturday night
and, as expected, was decisively
thrashed, 55-7. It was a case of
too much Arizona speed against
a porous Badger defense.
Northwestern couldn't repeat its
upset over Miami (Fla.) and bow-
ed to the Hurricanes Friday night,
28-7.
Michigan, with an offense start-
ing slowly and then tapering off
as the game progressed, couldn't
recover from two quick California
touchdowns and lost to the Bears,
21-7.
When's Ohio State? Coach
Woody Hayes takes a dim view of
"exhibition games" and the Buck-
eyes took the Saturday off, leav-
ing Big Ten teams with an unim-
pressive 4-5 record for their ef-
forts over the weekend.
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NEXT" TIME?

I

Major 'league Standings

AMERICAN

LEAGUE
W L Pet.

xDetroit 101, 56 .644
-Baltimore 89 68 .570
y8oston 84 72 .538
Cleveland 83 73 .532'
New York 80 76 .513
yOakland 78 78 .500
yMinnesota 75 81 .481
yCalifornia 66 90 .423
yChicago 64 92 .410
yWashington 60 95 .387
x-Clinched pennant.
y-Late game not included.
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Oakland
Minnesota at California
Boston at Washington
Detroit at Baltimore
Cleveland at New York, 2
YESTERDAY'S GAMES
Baltimore 2, _Detroit 1
Boston at Washington, inc.
Chicago at Oakland, inc.
Minnesota at California, inc.

GB
111.4
161 /
171/2
202
22Y2
251/
34V
361
40

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
xSt. Louis 94 63 .599
San Francisco 85 72 .541
yCincinnati 81 75 .519
Atlanta 79 78 .503
Chicago 79 78 .503
yPittsburgh 78 78 ',.500
Los Angeles 74 83 .471
Philadelphia 73 84 .465
New York 71 86 .452
Houston 70 87 .446
x-Clinched pennant.
y-Late game not included.

GB
9
12Y2
15
15
151,j
20
21
23
24

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2575 So. State St., Ann Arbor Phone 761-3200
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Prpfessional Standings

NATIONAL FOOTBALL LEAGUE
WESTERN CONFERENCE

.

Coastal Division,
W L- T Pet. PF
Baltimore 2 0 '0 1.00 55
Los Angeles 1 0 0 1.000 45
sad; Francisco 1 1 0 .500 45
Atlanta' -0 2 0' .000 27
Central Division
Minnesota. 2 0 0 1.000 73
Detroit 1 1 0 .500 55
Green Bay 1 1 0 .500 43
Chicago 0 2 0 .000 28
EASTERN CONFER NCE
Capital Divisio
New York 2 0 0 1.000 68
Dallas 2 0 . .1.000 87
Washington 1 1 0 .500 55'
Philadelphia 0 2 0 .000 3$
Century Division.
Cleveland 1 1 0 .500 31
New Orleans 1 1 0 .500 47.
St. Louis 0 2 0 .000 17
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 :000 30

rPA
30
10
44
75
20
59,
39
80

SUNDAY'S RESULTS
Detroit 42, Chicago 0
Baltimore 28, Atlanta 20
Dallas 28, Cleveland 7
Minnesota 26, Green Bay 13
New York 34, Philadelphia 25
Los Angeles 45, Pittsburgh 10
San Francisco 35, St. Louis 17.
New Orleans 37, Washington17
AMERICAN FOOTBALL LEAGUE

TODAY'S GAMES
Cincinnati at Pittsburgh
Los Angeles at Chicago
San Francisco at Houston
New York at Atlanta
Philadelphia at St. Louis
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 9, Pittsburgh 6. 2, inc.

',+

45
20
65
64

Eastern Division
W L T Pct.I
New York 2 0 0 1.000
Boston 1 1 0 .500
Houston 1 2 0 .333
Miami 0 2 0 .000
Buffalo 0 3 0 .000
Western Division
Oakland 2 0 0 1.000
San Diego 2 0 0 1.000
Kansas City 2 1 0 .667
Cincinnati 2 1 0 .667
Denver 0 2 0 .000
tnrSUNDAY'S RESULTS
New York 47, Boston 31
Cincinnati 34, Buffalo 23
Kansas City 33, Denver 2"

PF
67
47
59
31
36
95
59
79
71
12

PA
50
54
66
71
98
27,
27
43
62
58

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the
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And furthermore, if you are especially
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At NSA you will be joining an Agency
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That's a lot to ask.
Do you fit the picture?
Where to go... what to do
Language applicants must take the
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