100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 24, 1968 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Six
Pettfionin9g
Joint UC ry Counci
Pick up Petitions
outside SGC office
1st floor SAB
y
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 25, 1968
--

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, September 24, 1968

t

WALLY WEBER:

?i,! :.-

Moving with
By JIM WILE:::

The Man

---apoplexy-
doug helier
Hooray, hooray, I got a letter to the editor the first of the year") .
And breaking all Daily sports staff traditions. I will reprint it and try.
to be fair to the writer, without attacking him in the end. This is not
to say, however, that I agree in the slightest with his point of view.

NOW

ON SALE

N

When a freshman comes to Ann
Arbor for orientation he is led
around the campus and his little
head is crammed with tasty tid-
bits like: Over here we have the
new Administration building, and
on your left is the new library
section, and now we're in the
North Campus.I
It seems many have forgotten
that an important part of the
Univeristy is it's long and glorious
tradition.
Tradition, says the Man, is the
handing down of beliefs and cus-
toms by word of mouth. Just
about about the best mouth
around can be found in the pos-
session of one Wally Weber.-
With Wally it's more than rah,
rah, rah, let's beat State. A mouth
with soul, he really believes in his
school.
LONG TIME
The University of Michigan is
Weber's school and he's proud of
it. He's been around Michigan
athletics for quite a while, over 40
years. In that, time he has played,
coached, and worked with dedica-
tion to the University.
He's talked with a pile of eager
athletes and interested alumni all
over the country about his favorite
An organizational meeting for
the women's Speed Swim Club
will be held tonight, at 7:30
p.m., at Margaret-Ball Pool. Old
members and newcomers are
invited to attend.
The Women's Fencing Club
will hold its organizational
meeting tomorrow at 7 p.m. at
the Women's Athletic Building.
Everyone is invited to attend.
Residence Hall Horseshoes
competition begins tonight at
Wines Field. Check your sched-
ule.
"Let us style a
FLATTERING HAIR CUT
to your individual needs."
-no appointment needed
The Dascola Barbers

those under way earn the Weber
smile of approval.
In a sport that is constantly
changing, keeping tabs on new
developments can keep a public
relations man busy.
But when Weber's not directly
expounding on the greatness of
his school he manages to find
time to help operate a boy's camp
outside of Toronto. It takes a lot!
of effort and determination.
Wally Weber is a good-type,
dedicated man who believes in the
value of tradition. He comes on
strong, like a goldminer who's
struck it rich, maybe a little too
strong for some of the Sophis-
ticates.
It may sound a bit corny when
he says to you with confidence,
"It's love of school, pride, and
sacrifice that makes for success.
If the kids would only sing the
praises of Michigan and know that
they're the greatest, then no one
can beat them."
How does it feel to ,be one of
the beautiful?

WALLY WEBER

I

Dear Sir:
One wonders what qualities of
mind and emotion lead a student
sports writer to castigate an un-
dergraduate team in the manner
that Mr. Heller chose to castigate
the football team in Sunday's
Daily! Nothwithstanding his ob-
Vious disappointment that Mich-
igan lost to California, was it
really necessary to adopt a style
so full of denigration and con-
tempt as finally to suggest that
"Maybe the team should go down
to play Duke Saturday and stay
there"?
In American life it seems we
may tolerate, even encourage, all
sorts of excesses and aberrations,
but woe to those who let us down

RENOWNED'
ARTISTS
SUPERB
WORKS
AT.
35%

I

on the athletic field. Yet surely
there is room for magnanimous
spirit in our thinking about inter-
collegate sport. If such mag-
nanimity is not to be found with-
in. the University itself, where
standards of gentility and good
sportsmanship (I trust) still re-
main standards to be honored,
why should we continue to stress
the importance of games in our
educational programs? And if it
does still reside within our com-
munity, why should a team of
players be treated like the scum
of the earth in their own Univer-
sity newspaper?
Yours sincerely,
L. L. Orlin
Dept. of Near Eastern
Languages and Literature

I

COMPLETE
ANGEL-CAPITOL.
CATALOGUE

subject: Michigan sports. Pep
rallies, sports banquets, radio and
television Weber's ready to go
anywhere to sing the praises of
his alma mater.
And why not? As Weber says,
"Who knows more about the his-
tory of a school than someone
who's lived through a great deal
of it and seen it first hand."
For Wally Weber his Michigan
days began in the roaring twen-
ties. "It was a beautiful place like
now with all those squirrels run-
ning around."
Influenced by the leadership
and vision of Fielding H. Yost, he
was attracted to Michigan after
finishing high school in Mt.
Clemens.
He came to play fullback under
one of the greatest spoi'ts minds
to ever run a team. He played for
two years, graduated, then took
a brief but winning post as a high
school coach.
Weber was then called back to
Michigan as a backfield coach.
Under the -directorship of Fritz
Crisler, Weber took the position
that he now holds.
GLOBS OF MEMORIES
In 40 years a guy can gather in
a lot of memories. Traditions of
victories, Rose Bowls, and All-
Americans. Michigan men and
Michigan stories and if you've got
a couple of years free time Web-
er's ready to fill you in on all the
details as he saw 'em.
Notice, as he mentions the
name Harmon, Oosterbaan, and
Kramer, a smile begins to spread
smoothly across his face.
Weber is a strange man, don't
misunderstand him. He may do a
lot of things but one thing he
doesn't do is live in the past.
He's pretty hip on today's
Michigan sport scene. He can get
just as hot over Ron Johnson as
he does with Tom Harmon.
Loyal as ever, faith leads him to
believe that this year's crop of
athletes are as good as any that's
been plowed on Michigan soil.
Specifically, he praises Athletic!
Director Don Canham as a man
most likely to carry on in the
imaginative tradition of Yost and
Crisler. Projects accomplished and

SAVINGS

Reminiscing the Good 01'. Days
when football was really football

By JIM GOSNELL
When the future looks bleak,
morale can often be raised by
gazing into the past. And few
teams can claim more glory in
retrospect than Michigan.
The year was 1925, and , the
fashionable crowd was doing they
Charleston and making bathtub
gin. Fielding "Hurry-Up" Yost,
whose point-a-minute teams of
1901-1905 had annihilated the op-
position, put together what he de-
clared to be his best team ever.
Instrumental to the success of the
team was a sophomore Dutch boy
from Muskegon named Bennie
Oosterbaan.
A nine-letter man (football, bas-
'M' skippers
take top honors
over weekend.
Michigan sailors carried off
three first place trophies last
Sunday at the Gargantuan Re-
gatta in Madison. Hosted by Wis-
consin, this regatta included
teams from 19 midwestern col-
leges.
On a system of low point scor-
ing, Michigan, came in first with a
total 101 points. Notre Dame fol-
lowed with 169, and Wooster was
third with 187 points. Two troph-
ies were awarded, but one is a
traveling cup.
Steve Klotz, skippering the en-
try in the A division, also picked
up a trophy as the lowest point
skipper. He accumulated six firsts
and two seconds in 11 races.
In the B division, Tim Sterns,
who has just begun racing inter-
collegiately, finished second.

ai

ketball, baseball), it was the grid-
iron, however, that was the-young
Oosterbaan's true calling. Three
straight years he made All Amer-
ica. The combination of Benny
Friedman fading back to pass ana
the! talented Oosterbaan gliding
down field on pattern was enough
to cause many a" coach to lose his
cool.
Motivated by "state pride" and
"Michigan is a' great filstituWon,"
Bennie Oosterbaan provided many
a memorable moment for the
Maize and Blue partisans..
In the era of two-way perform-
ances, ithis perhaps somewhat
ironic that" one 'of: Michigan's
greatest offensive ends of all tii e
had his best moment on defense.
In a game against Minnesota in
1926, the Blue were trailing 6-0.
The .Gophers had rolled for 12
first downs to none for Michigan,
and were in Michigan territory
again in the fourth quarter. A
Minnesota back fumbled and Oos-
terbaan, smashing in from his de-
fensive end position, grabbed the
errant ball and gcampre'd 60
yards for the score. Friedman con-
verted, Minnesota never recovered,
and Michigan went on to win their'
second consecutive Big Ten title.
A quarter of a century later the
times had changed. Gin could now
be bought in stores and the
Charleston was "out." ,But it was
the Mme Oosterbaan-a winner.
In 1 47 Fritz Crisler guided Mich-
igan to a 10-0 season, a number
one ranking in the national polls,
and was subsequently named coach
of the year. Crisler became ath-
letic director and assistant coach
Oosterbaan took over as coach in
1948.
It was like an instant replay
one year later. Michigan was 9-0,
ranked number one in the na-
tional polls, and Oosterbaan was
named coach of the year. But the
Rose Bowl journey would have to
wait because Michigan had gone
west the previous year.

4

AVAI LABLE AT

Near Michigan Theatre

I

717 N. University
663-7375 .

I

I

!i

.

f

BAHAMAS
10 FABULOUS DAYS
9 GLORIOUS NIGHTS
$19900
Dec. 26th-Jan. 4th
INCLUDES:
0 Round trip jet air fare
- 9 Nights accommoda-
tions at the famous
Freeport Inn
i 9 Great happy hours
PLUS, PLUS, PLUS
$50 Holds Your Reservations
CALL:
Your Campus Representative
DICK RINI, 769-0226
or
STUDENTOURS, 886-0844

L

TODD'S GENTRY SHOP,
1209 S. University
AST DAY TODAI
TUESDAY, Sept. 24-2 P.M.-2 A.M.
GQING OUT
OF. BUSINESS!
THIS IS IT!
NOTHING HELD BACK!
EVERYTHING MUST GO!

BENNY OOSTERBAAN
The roses finally bloomed for
Oosterbaan in 1950 when Michigan
pulled out a 9-3 victory over Ohio
State, a lavie played in a blizzard
and near zero temperatures. On
New Year's day California fell
1'4-6.
,Oosterbaan continued as coach
through the 1958 season, after
which he was appointed Director
of Public Relations for the athletic
department, the position he pres-
ently holds.
When Bennie Oosterbaan re-
tires, one of the best chapters in
Michigan football history will be
over. A chapter that has not been
written frequently in recend years.
A winning chapter.
Maybe it is time for new
authors.

I
't
i
't
t
r
I

I

b.

F

4

3

I

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan