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September 20, 1968 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-20

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Friday, September 20, '1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Friday, September 20, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

CITE

Malaysia suspends
ties with Philippines

House

slashes

Thursday & Friday
SIBRIAEN
LADY
MACBETH
Directed by
ANDRZEJ WAJDA
1963 ,
By the directorofl
"Ashes and Diamonds"
and leader of thb
Polish "new wave."
First time in Ann Arbor
4 7 5 c '
7:00 & 9:05
ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

KUALA LUMPUR ;()-Malay-
sia announced suspension of dip-
lomatic relations and abrogation
of antismuggling pact with the
Philippines yesterday in response
to a new Philippine law annexing
Sabah, the Malaysian state on
Borneo.
In Manila, Foreign Secretary
Narciso Ramos called the an-
nouncement of Prime Minister
Tunku Abdul Rahman "a serious
mistake . . . belligerent, belli-
cose."
But leaders of both nations said
they had no intention of resorting
to force.
Rahman emphasized his nation
was suspending-not ,breaking-
diplomatic ties with Manila.
"We will maintain only a skele-
ton administrative staff there,"
he said.
Demonstrators turned out in
Kuala Lumpur and other major
towns in Malaysia to voice support
HILLEL
Tonight at 6:15
STUDENT SABBATH r
SERVICES
1429 Hill Street

of Rahman's action and pledge to
defend Malaysia "to the last drop
of our blood."
"Let us hope there is no blood-
shed,' Rahman said. "Malaysia is
preparing for the worst but hoping
for the best."
Support came also from a Brit-
ish )military official in Hong Kong.
"We fully support the case that
Sabah is part of Malaysia, said
Gen. Sir Michael Carver. He told
newsmen five British Royal Air
Force jet fighters flew over Sabah
yesterday at Rahman's request.
But, he added the request was
made before President Ferdinand
E. Marcos of the Philippines sign-
ed the law in Manila Wednesday.
Rahman's move suspending re-
lations and abrogating the treaty
was seen by diplomats here as a
Malaysian attempt to shift the
burden to Manila.
"Now if relations are going to be
completely cut, it's going to have
to be Marcos who calls for it," one
informant said.
A presidential spokesman in
Manila said Marcos planned no
retaliatory steps at least until he
receives official word of the Ma-
laysian action.
Smuggling between Sabah and
the Sulu Is1pnds, at the southern
tip of the Philippines chain, has!
reportedly cost the Manila gov-
ernment $100 million a year.
Ss

apropriation
for foreign aid
WASHINGTON () - The House passed and sent to the
Senate yesterday a $1.62 billion foreign aid appropriation bill,
smallest in the 20-year history of the program.
The roll-call vote was 173 to 139.
The House upheld after several hours of listless debate a
45 per cent cut of $1.3 billion recommended by its Appropria-
tions Committee in the $2.9 billion of new financing requested
by President Johnson,
Only two attempts were made to increase the committee-
approved funds. One, to add $50 million for Alliance For Pro-
gress loans and grants tom
South American nations, lost
by voice v o t e. The other, to
add $45 million for supportingaCnzeelo
assistance, was ruled out of order
on a technicality.i
Not since it began in 1948 as then le
Marshall Plan has the aid pro-
gram been given such meager fi-
nancing. Last year Congress ap-
propriated $2.39 billion. rest S
As the House voted on the mon-
ey bill, the Senate completed ac-
tion on a separate authorization PRAGUE (M)-Foreign Minister
measure putting a $1.97 billion Jiri Hajek resigned yesterday and
ceiling on the amount of money Premier Oldrich Cernik has been
that could be provided for the appointed acting foreign minister,
present fiscal y e a r ending next the official Prague Radio report-
June 30. The House passed th ed.
authorization bill earlier in the Haiek's removal had been de-

-Associated Press

Boston demonstrator s confront Humphrey

Protesters

ee

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PRIOR TO BROADWAY!

SEPTEMBER 17-29

MOL IFRF'S

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"A RESOUNDING HIT--
WORTH CELEBRATING'

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By The Associated Press
Hubert H. Humphrey, with Sen.
Edward M. Kennedy at his side,
faced the biggest crowd of his
presidential campaign yesterday
in downtown Boston-and ran in-!
to some of his noisest hecklers.
Hundreds of antiwar demon-
strators ringed the platform where
the Vice President spoke, repeat-!
edly trying to drown out his!
words and even those of Kennedy
as he stated his unhesitating en-!
dorsement of the Democratic can-
didate.
Neither man could ignore the
shouts and chanting, and both
addressed the subject off the cuff.
!"Your actions,"- Humphrey told'
the demonstrators, "are going to!
disgust the American people and
harm the cause of peace."
The demonstrators responded
with a new chant, "We are thel
American people."
In introducing Humphrey Ken-
nedy said:
"I think if there is one lesson
of 1968, it is that there is no room
for anarchy, that there is no room
for violence, and there is no so-
lution to difficult and compelling
problems by shouting and scream-:
ink.

gled their fingers at the Mas-
sachusetts senator and started
yelling in unison, "Shame on Ted-
dY."
Estimates of the number of on-
lookers at the noon-hour cam-
paign rally in front of one of
Boston's largest downtown de-
partment stores -ranged .from
10,000 to 20,000. It clearly was the
largest throng Humphrey has seen
in any one spot since his cam-
paign began.
Meanwhile ,in Springfield, Mo.,
Richard M. Nixon promised that
if he wins the presidency he will
choose an administration includ-
ing Democrats and independents
as well as Republicans.

11 1
His pledge of bipartisanship
came in a radio address on the
nature of the presidency, recorded
for broadcast tonight and made
public as the Republican nominee
campagned in the Midwest.
Nixon said he wants an admin-
istration drawn "from the broad-
est possible base," from all
parties and all callings.
He said if he wins the White
House he will be an activist Presi-
dent, taking positions which may
not always be popular and telling
the people why.
"I don't believe in government
by Gallup poll," Nixon said. He
said "The blanket of concensus"
means mediocrity.

World news roundup

day.
The swift action resulted from
a H o u s e decision to suspend a
standing rule requiring that ap-
propriation bills lie over for three
days before being voted on. The
vote on this procedure was 293 to
58 as members voiced a desire to
speed up their work in expectation
of an early October adjournment.
The aid bill was the 1 as t of
more than a dozen regular money
measures. All h a v e cleared the
House, but several are awaiting
Senate action or adjustment of
differences with the House.

By The Associated Press ;
SAIGON - South VietnameseJ
battle deaths have exceeded Amer-
ican losses every week for the past
two months, indicating govern-
ment forces are taking a bigger
share of the fighting.
Allied casualty figures released

-V rity

Directed by Stephen Porter

Undaunted, the protestors wag- I yesterday showed that 1,824 Amer-

icans have been killed in action
since July 21 while government
combat fatalities in the s a m e
eight weeks were 2,604.
It was the first time this year
that South Vietnamese losses have
been greater than those of Ameri-
can units for such a long period.
TEL AVIV - An Israeli lieu-l
tenant colonel and a major were'
killed Tuesday in an Arab ambush
that also cost the lives of four
other Israeli troops, it was learned
yesterday.
Four other Israelis were wound-
ed.

I

ALL-TIME GREAT FLICK!
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UNION-LEAGUE
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The hanging was the best show in town.
But they made two mistakes.
They hung the wrong man
aid they didn't finish the job.

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"NIXON IS A LOSER" or
"HUMPHI EY"
BUMPER STICKERS
We're neutral: Pick the
man not of your choice.
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The Arabs were wiped out, but
it was Isr'ael's most disastrous en-
counter with guerrillas since the
six-day war in June 1967.
The clash occurred near the oc-
cupied west bank town of Tubas,
1; miles from the Jordan River
frontier and 9 miles northeast of
the Arab city ,of Nablus.
*. * *
WASHINGTON - Senate Re-
publican Leader Everett M. Dirk-
sen of Illinois said yesterday that
withdrawal of Abe Fortas' nomi-
nation to be chief justice would
save "a lot of juicy headlines."
Dirksen, however, did not say he
thought President Johnson should
withdraw the nomination and
made plain he does not expect him
to do so.
DENVER, Colo. - Continuing
gains against cancer were reported
yesterday by the government's Na-'
tional Cancer Institute. But lung
cancer was again the glaring ex-
The third "End Results in Can-
cer" report evaluated data on al-
most 400,000 patients at about 100
hospitals over the past 25 years.
The report noted increased sur-
vival rates for patients with can-
cer of the olon -and rectum, the
most frequently occurring form
I in the United States, and for pa-
tients with cancer of the breast,
which kills more women than any
other form of the disease.!

manded by the Soviet Union dur-
ing Kremlin talks four weeks ago.
He is one of three officials of
the liberal Communist regime -
headed by party chief Alexander
Dubcek - whose removal the
Russians demanded.
The other two were Deputy
Premier Ota Sik and Interior Min-
ister Josef Pavel.
Sik is reported to have been ap-
pointed commercial counselor of
the Czechoslovak Embassy in
Belgrade and Pavel is on pension.
Hajek is expected to seek a profes-
sorship at Prague University.
Hajek demanded the withdrawal
of Soviet and other occupation
forces from Czechoslovakia in a
speech before the United Nations
Security Council in New York the
weekend of Aug. 24-25. Later he
requested that the Czechoslovak
issue be dropped from the pro-
ceedings.
Soviet and other occupation
forces have taken a direct hand
in controlling at least three
Czechoslovak newspapers that of-
fended them, the official Com-
munist press reported.
Wallace ma
get equal time
WASHINGTON ()-The House
Commerce Committee modified
yesterday its equal-time suspen-
sion bill to insist that Richard M.
Nixon, Hubert H. Humphrey and
George C. Wallace be given the
chance to appear on the same de-
bate program.
But after taking this step, the -
committee ran into a parliamen-
tary snag which left the status bf
the controversial bill up in the
air.
Chairman Harley 0- Staggers
(D-W. Va.) said the 'issue won't
be resolved until the next com-
mittee meeting, probably Wednes-
day.
"But the way it is now," Stag-
gers said, "I expect the bill to be
approved."
Rep. Brock Adams (D-Wash.)
a committee member, said Wed-
nesday the measure was "in deep
trouble."

'" ^ h

DIAL 665-6290
Twice Daily
at 1 :30!and 7:30 P.M..

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