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September 14, 1968 - Image 8

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-14

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 14, 1968

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ELECTORAL COLLEGE REFORM?

Wallace

bid challenges system

Exotic dancer moves
on state legislatue

By JOHN BECKLER
Associated Press Staff Writer

t

WASHINGTON -J No matter
how he fares in November, George
Wallace may go down in history
as the mai who finally caused the
American electorial system to be
changed.
For 180 years the nation has
been struggling with the method
laid down in the Constitution for
picking a president.
Generally it has w o r ke d,
through luck and a genius for
improvisatioh.
As a result, attempts over the
years to rewrite the Founding
Fathers' formula in terms of mod-
ern political realities have failedl
to stir up much interest or sup-
port.
Now Wallace's third-party can-
didacy has raised the distinct pos-
sibility that the fine print in the
Constitution will have to be fol-
lowed again, and the prospect is
apalling to many political leaders
di hiA k

What the Constitution says is
that the president and vice presi-
dent shall be chosen by electors
appointed by each state, the num-
ber of electors being equal to
the number of state's senators
and representatives in Congress.
If further states that where no
candidate gets a majority of the
electors' votes; the House shall
select the President.
That has happened twice and
not everybody was happy about
the outcome either time.
After long jockeying Thomas
Jefferson won out in 1800 and
wound up with political enemy
Aaron Burr; his chief rival for the
top -post, as his vice president..
Under rules amended enough to
bar that particular outcome John
Quincy Adams beat out Andrew
Jackson in 11824 and became one
of the few presidents to win from
a competitor who had beaten him
in the popular vote.
A m o n g the improvisations

worked out over the years are the3
choosing of electors in each state
by popular election in November,
and the awarding of the state's
entire electoral vote to the candi-
date who wins that state's popu-
lar vote.
Wallace's whole campaign is
based on the electoral vote system.
He could, conceivably, win the
presidency by getting 34 per cent
of the popular vote in a sufficient
number of states where Hubert
H. Humphrey and Richard M.
Nixon divided the rest evenly.
More likely; he could get enough
electoral votes to keep either Nix-
on or Humphrey from getting a
majority.
In the latter case, from Nov.
4, when the voters choose the elec-
tors, until Dec. 16, when the
electors cast .their ballots, the, na-
tion would not know who its hext
President was going to be. And
if the electors followed the Nov. 4
returns-although there is do
Constitutional requirement they

do so--the decision would be open'
until the House settles it in Jan-
uary.
There is even a thin possibility
nobody would get the required
actual majority in the House and
the vice president, to be elected
by the Senate, would take over..
It is this prospect of a sorely
divided nation,caught up in war
and domestic turmoil, drifting two
months without an elected lead-
er to succeed President Johnson-
and then possibly coming up with
a man chosen as a result of politi-
cal trading in Congress-that is
giving many people the shakes.
House and Senate leaders of
both parties are among those call-
ing for change and promising to
push for a constitutional amend-
ment in the next Congress. The
American Bar Association is con-
ducting a persistent campaign for,
reform. Newspapers and maga-
zines are giving the message wide
circulation.

LANSING , - Exotic dancer
Lady Estelle should be able to per-
form her bumps and grinds at a,
choice location within the shadow
of the state capitol, the S t a t e/
Appeals Court has held.
Lady Estelle at one time had a
boa constrictor as a dancing part-
ner. About four weeks ago, how-
ever, the snake bit her. Now she's
doing a solo.
Paul Derose, owner of Amedo'sI
Bar, has been fighting for four
years to move his bar-show spot
from Washington Avenue to West
Michigan Avenue.
The Washington Avenue loca-
tion is three blocks west of' the
heart of Lansing. The West Mich-
igan spot is one-half block from
the state capitol, opposite the po-
lice station and city hall and next
to the Jack Tarr, Lansing's larg-
est hotel and the one most fre-
quented by legislators and con-
ventioneers.
DeRose is being forced to re-
locate because of a downtown ur-

ban redevelopment project t h a t
soon will mean removal of the
buildings in the block.
Last December, Ingham County
Circuit Judge Sam Street Hughes
ordered the city to approve the
move, although the police depart-
ment recommended its defeat.
The appeals court upheld the cii-
cuit court.
"I plan to move as soon as pos-
sible," DeRose said, "And Lady
Estelle will go with me."
About four weeks ago, DeRose
explained, the more than 10 foot'
long boa constrictor, bit the face
of Estelle Beardsley, who dances
under the name of Lady Estelle.
"She screamed for about half
an hour," DeRose continued. "We
called a policeman and asked him
to shoot it but he ran for help."
Lady Estelle,, however, said she
is thinking of attempting to make
a comeback with another snake
as dancing partner. "My partner
this time would be a 15-foot ana-
conda - this is a water snake and
poisonous but I'm willing to risk
it for, my career," the pretty red-
head said.

ROBIN BROWN
jazz arid other
music for moderns
8 to Midnight
turn M on

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WOIA--FM
102.9

ana t Ln ers. nIivJAg ta r.,..u ,. ...., .r. ., --_-_

IN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an'
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
lal responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITER form to
Room 3528 L. S.'& A. Bldg., be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
NIotices may be published' a maxi-
mumiof two times on request; Day
Calend4ar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accOpted for publication, For more
information call 764-9270.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 14
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild: MichaelIangelo Anton-
ioni's' Il Grido: Architecture Auditor-?
ium, 7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
General Notices
Broadcasting Service:, Radio Station
WUOM-FM (91.7 Mc.) 11 a.m. to 11, p.m.
daily Saturday 1:00 p.m. Carolina Sym-
posium: Red China and The West -
Alexander Eckstein, Prof. of' Economics
and Director, Center for Chinese Stud-
ies, "The Dynamics of Development".
Recorded at the U. of Carolina at
Chapel Hill. 5:15 p.m. Jazz Revisited.-
Hazen Schumacher presents Ella Fitz-
gerald: recordings from '1938 to 1946.
Sunday (9/15) 1:30 p.m. Martin Luther
Ling - "Youth Action and Con-
science", a repeat broadcast of the CBOC
Massey''Lectures, recorded by Dr. King
before his death. 4:00 p.m. Library of
Congress Lectures -,od 'Sterling dis-
cusses the miass media and the 2th
century writer.
The Michigan Memorial-Ihoenix Pro-
ject ihvites requests for faculty re-
search grants to support.research with-
in the scope of the term "peaceful uses
of nuclear energy." Typical areas in
which the Project is interested are:
Biological effects of radiat n, Radia-
tion dosimetry, New uses of isotopes,
New tracer techniques, Direct conver-

........ _________

sion of nuclear energy to electrical
energy, The fusion process, Plasmas as
related to controlled fusion, Radiation
chemistry, Nuclear weapons prolifera-
tion and disarmament, Psychological
attitude toward nuclear energy haz-
arms, Evaluatioh of hazards to urban
populations from nuclear activities, and
Economic studies of nuclear activities
including power producton. New re-
search ideas and pilot projects are
particularly encouraged. The relation-
ship to peaceful 4ses of nucear energy,
however, must b' clear. The routine use
of isotope tracer techniques will not
by' itself justify support. Requests for
grants of $3,000 or less are most appro-
priate. Grants may cover equipment,
supplies, research assistance, \and field
strips. Applications for these grants
should be returned to the Phoenix rPo-
ject by Monday, September 23, 1968.
Grants will be made by Decemb'er 1,
1968, Appfcation blanks may be obtain-
ed from the, office of the Phoenix
Project at they Phoenix Memorial Lab-
oratory on the North Campus or by
calling 764-6213..
Histor,;Department lecture. Profes-
sor Keith'Hopkins of the University' of
Hong Kong will lecture.. of "Sociologi-
cal Methods and Ancient History"
Tuesday, September 17, 4:10 p.m. in
110 Physics-Astronomy Building.
The University of Michigan Senate
Assembly: Monday, September 16, 3:15
p.m., West Conference Room Rackham,
4th floor, Agenda: 1. Committee Ap-
pointments; 2. Regental Byjaw Propos-
als; 3. Interim Report of the Commit-
tee on Communications Media (This]
report, was distributed to you in A
separate mailing on September 3 and
was also reproduced in its entirety in
the September 4 issue of The Michigan
Daily.); 4. University Budget (faculty
salaries and tuition).
SUMMARY OF ACTION TAKEN BY
STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL
AT ITS MEETING
SEPTEMBER 12, 1968:
Appointed: Victor Adamo as Chair-
man of the Voter Registration Commit-
tee.
Appointed: Sherry Meyer Personnel
Director.
Appointed: Doug Barth at Elections
Direc tor.
ipp nted: Michael Davis to the Stu-
dent-F culty Relations Committee
(SACUA).
Appointed: Bruce Levine to the Civil
Liberties Board.
Appointed: Mark Schreiber, Mike Ma-
terna, Sherry Meyer and Fred Mathai
to the Student Housing Advisory Board.
Appointed: Mike Maturna as Vice
Chairman of Student Housing Associa-
tion.
Approved: That the Iranian Student,
Community Association be granted re-
cognition as a student community or-
ganization,
Approved: That Students for Esch be
granted recognition as a student or-
ganization.

Approved:! That Small Photo Club
be granted recognition as a student or-
ganization.
I Approved: That U. of M. Judo Club
be .granted rcognition as a student or-
ganization.

ed as ex-officio member of S t u d en t
Government Council.
Appointed: Ellen Heyboer and Gayle
Rubin to the Interviewing Committee
for vacancies on Council.
Approved: That SGC allocate $32.50

Approved: That U. of M. Marxist Dis- .for Sharon Lowen (Panther White, if
cussion Group be granted recognition Sharon is unable to attend) to attend,
as a student organization. the Conference on Revolutionary
Approved : To appropriate $100 to the Politics in New York City.
Columbia University Strike Committee
to help defray travel and other costs
of a foreign student leader, Further, to D co a
appoint Paul Milgrom to look into
raising additional funds outside SGCi Examinations
for the same purpose.i
Approved: To remove $1,500 from the Wayne Paul Alley, Fisheries, Disserta-
SGC bail money as soon as most of tion: "Ecology of the Burrowing Am-
the money given for bail of people ar- phipod Pontoporeia affinis in Lake
rested in the September 5-6 fracas in Michigan," on Monday, Sept. 16 at 2
Ann Arbor is returned to the SGC bail p.m. in Room 1036 Natural Resources,
fund. To do so with the clear under- Chairman: F. E. Smith.
standing that SGC reserves the right
and maintains its intention to returnt
to the bail fund that $1500 or a sum ! Placement
of a different size in the future should

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the situation warrant. 3200 S.A.B.
Approved: That since the University GENERAL DIVISIONc
budget has long been a point of con- Placement Services Registration
fusio~pi and frustration for members of Meetings: To acquaint students, un-
the University Community, thestate dergraduate and graduate,dwith Place-
legislature, and the general public; And ment Services Explanations of aids in
since the total financial structure and career planning from the counseling,c
priorities of this instituton are at best decision making stages, through inter-r
n need of sncere and searching 'ques- viewing, application, and final accept-
tioning and study, And furthermore, ance of the position. All areas of thes
snee Student Government Council be- Services will be represented, Generalt
lieves that the need for a student and Placement, Teacher Placement, Sum-
faculty committee to review, study, and mer Placement ,and Career Counseling.
probe the total financial picture of the Tuesday, September 17, 1968. 3:00 and
University of Michgan is at its peak, 4:00 meetings. Auditorium D, Angella
BE IT RESOLVED THAT SGC join Hall. All members of the Universityf
with the Graduate Assembly, and the Community welcome. Get started on
Senate Advisory Committee on Univer- this all important task early, let, Place-
sity Affairs in forming the Financial ment Services help you,
Revew Commttee; and declare ts inten- Current Position Openings receivedl
tions to appoint members to said coin- by General Division by mall and phone,
mittee.. please call 764-7460 for further informa-
Approved: To approve the Draft of tion:r
Policies Governing Student Records on Decca Survey System, Garden City,
condition that students have the right Georgia: Radio 'tation Operator, 4 c
to examine contents of all non-medical openings, for Mobile aircraft navigationf
records, and That faculty privilege ac- chain, operations from trailer, no spec- l
cess be eliminated. ific education req., exper or coursesI
Approved:: To amend SGC's Block in electronics, reading circut diagrams.#
Ticket Sales Police, Section 2, first sen- State of New York Education Depart-
tence. Current wording - Recognized ment, Office of Planning in Higher Ed-
housing units and recognized student ucation: Chief, Higher Education RT-
or, student community organizations search, PhD, and 4 years exper, min'
may submit . . . Proposed wording 12 credits research methodology. As-
- Any group numbering at least ten sociate Higher Education Research,
students may submit . . . near PhD, thesis not necessary, 4 years
Approved: That Gene Smith be ap- at univ. position. Assistant Higher Edu-
pointed Chairman of the Student Con- cation Research, MA, some credits in
sumers' Union research courses. Chief of iFnancial
Appointed: Panther White, Neil Hol- Planning, expense and income pat-
lenshead, and Mark Hodaax to the nUi- terns of state education, Bckrnd. in
versity Committee on Calendaring. Econ., 5 yrs. at univ. level. in busi-
Approved: To amend Section 1 of ness affairs, plus 2 yrs in budget.
Procedures for Regulations of Student State of Washington, Blind School,
Organizations by striking "returned by and School for Deaf, Vancover, Wash.-
SOC to the submitting organizations" Teacher positions at two levels, lower
and substituting "destroyed by SGC" does not require degree, and are ap-
between " . . are to be" and "one pointed in emergency situations. Other
month after the last day . . ." seeks degree in special ed, certification
Approved: That Jack Meyers be seat- required, for teachng the blind, grad-
.- - ...'-- - - - -.

uates of schools of music are also
sought.
City of Benton Harbor, Mich.: Super-
intendent of parks, BA with with 1-5
years in general parks work, incl.
mgmt., landscape arch, forestry, horti-
culture, recreation. '
City of Detroit: Promotional Activ-
ities Assistant, degree in journ., speech,
of engl, exper in clerical inst., govnt.
antivnities of publicity media type,
knowl of conventions, trade show,
mun icipal organization, speaking skills.
Piano Accompanist, degree in music,
exper n. playing for folk and social
dancing, organized recreational prac-
tices and ability to read at sight. Other
positions in Clerical and office ma-
chsne operaton, professional and ad-
zninistrative, engineering, inspection,
medical and dental, nursing, hospital,
puble health, curators and lbrarians
social services -,recreation, park and
forestry maint., public services, trades,
building operating engineers, appren-]
tices.
State of Connecticut: Typist III, sta-
tistical. Stenographer. Design and RN-
view Supervisor. Clerk III. State aFrm
M\'atron. State Police PatrolmanI
rrainee. Accounting Clerk II. Chief of
Program Development, PhD in soc.,
criminology, psych, and 3 years in cor-
rectional work. ResearchScientist II,
behavioral Sci., PhD degree in behav.
sci, and 2 years in research. Most posi-
tions should be applied for before Sept.
26.
Summer Placement Service Room 212,
S.A.B., lower level, hours 10 - 12 a.m.
ad 1:30 -5 p..m. Mon. - Fri. Open now
for information and browsing, services.
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT SERVICE.
128 H, West Engrg. Bldg.
Engineering Placement Meeting: No.
1. "Engineering Market and Placement
Services." Salary and demand trends
and how to use the Engineering Place-
ment Service. First of four meetings.
Primarily for seniors and graduate stu-
dents, but open to all interested. Pro-
fessor J. G. Young. September 16, 4:00
p.m. and 7:30 pm. in Room 311, West
Engineering Building. (Afternoon and
evening meetings will be the same.)

UPTIGHT' /eet' 1Efifth...
An out-of-sight sign kit With 391 self-sticking vinyl 'let-
ters and numbers. With the BOLD 5/41 letters you can.
* MAKE YOUR OWN BUMPER STICkERS
s HOKE-UP YOUR MONDA
* LABEL YOUR LAMBR ETTA
" CUSTOMIZE YOUR BOOKS, BOOKBAG,
CRASH HELMET, LUGGAGE, RAINCOAT
OR ANYTHING
Hundreds of uses for these easy to apply, professional looking sign kits.
Choice of 3 groovy colors, yellow, black or white.
Send check or M.O. $3.95 ppd
BLOW YOURmmmMINDm- - -------- - ----
U C&G SALESCO.
BLOW $3951 11508 Katherine
Taylor, Mi. 48180
SATISFACTION Send me Mini Sign Kits
GUARANTEEDt $3.95 ...yell bick. white
Great party favor Name__
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inquire douHt i
Quantity discounts w r .r. 1 w.mmm mirniM r r n.w.u~mmp #mimmuuiimuui '.mu

,4

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ORGAN IZATION
- ~
NS
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to offically
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in room 1011 SAB.
Psychologists for Action and Social
Responsibility. Organizational meeting,
Union, Mon., Sept. 16th, 7:30 p.m., 3 B
Union,
University Lutheran Chapel: 1511,
Washtenaw: Sunday Service at 9:30 and
11:00 am. Rev. Richard Kapfer (EMU),
guest speaker, Sermon: The Sign of
Human Need. Communion at 11 .a.m.
Gamma Delta: Lutheran Student Or-
ganization: Supper Program at 1511"
Washtenaw, Sept. 15th t '6:00 p.m.
Student aPnel Discussion on campus
problems.
Hillel Foundation, 1429 Hill Street,
S'lichot, Services will be held early
Sunday morning, Sept. 15 at 12:40
a.m. Organizational meet,ng' of Hillel
players at 1:00 p.m. Israeli Sancirng,
2:00 p.m., Deli House (delicatesson, 6:00
p.m.,
* * *

WORSHIP

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PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist ;Convention
131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School
1 1 :00 a.m.-Morning Worship
6:30 p.m.-Training Union
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship

+i

RUSH

PU KAPPA. ALPHA
"The New Fraternity-In a New House"
F1923 Geddes Ave.
For Information Call

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
On the 'Campus-
Corner' State and William Sts.

CHURCH

UM YAF meetjng, Sept. 15th, 3:00
p.m. 3 r-s of union, Film strip, "TheF
Berkeley Revolution."
* * *
Graduate Outing Club: Meets Sunday
at 2:00 p.m. on Huron Street side of
Rackham Bldg. Hiking and canoeing.
At 7:30 p.m. in Outing Club room in'
Rackham election of officers and sup-
per,

..............

761-6152

761-6255

....d.,...c.._.. s........... r.... r:.v:.ix..r.. .x:..:<:, .::: Ki"7iSSS : S >.4}i:" 4%:tiv;

_ ..:.:....._.........:":::.:: :.....::........:.::____.:.-.......:,
- - ..n ..::x:a ....w...a .r:v : ":....... ...x . v :.o.::""}::4b:i::f::X.a:".:.:x..:w.:: ." :" ........ ....

Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
Summer Worship Service at 10:00 a.m. Ser-
mon: "Sit-ins Among Shut-Outs."
Sermon by Rev. Terry N. Smith
Church School through Sixth Grade
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor f
Sunday at 9:30 and 11:00 a.m.--Services,
with Holy Communion at 11:00.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper-
Program.
Monday'- at 7:30 p.m.-Church Membership
Class.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devotion.
Thursday at 7:30- p.m.-Course, History & Lit-
erature of Israel.
Friday at 6:30 p.m.-Choir Rehearsal.
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School
S11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship
6:00 psm.-Evening Worship
WEDNESDAY

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH'
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Phone 662-4466 -
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, John R.
Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Presbyterian Camnpus' Center located at the
Church
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
761-6749
Rev. Charles Johnson
9:30 a.m.-Coffee.
9:45 a.m.-U. Fellowship Bible Discussion.
11:00 a.m.-"Examining Affirmations of 'the
Supremacy of Jesus"
7:00 p.m.-Inter-Varsity Night: "The Rele-
vance of Jesus Christ in Campus Life."
8:30 p.m.-Campus and Careers fellowship
and food.
Transportation available through 761 6749.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH.
1917 Washtenaw Ave.
Dr. Erwin A. Goede, Minister
Phyllis St. Louis, Minister of Education
Church School and Services at 9:20.and 11:00
a.m.-"The God That Must Die."
Student Religious Liberals will meet at 6:00 at
the church. Discussion at the Gaede home.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
SUNDAY
10:30 a.m.-Worship Services, Sunday School
(2-20 years)
WEDNESDAY
8:00 p.m.-Testimony Meeting
Infants rooni available Sunday and Wednesday
Public Reading Room, 306 E. Liberty St. -
Mon. 10-9, Tues.-Sat. 10-5. Closed Sun-
days and Holidays.
"The Bible Speaks to You."' Radio WAAM
1600, Sunday. 8:00 a.m.
For transportation call 663-7321
-'i- -- '---- - - -- - '- -

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001' East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefyt, Paul Swets
And so you see I have come to doubt
All that I once held as true,
I stand alone without, beliefs
The only truth I know is you."
-Simon and Garfunkel
Is there no truth but "you?", Calvin S.
Maleft,' Ph.D.
Sunday, .10:30 a.m.-"What Con I Believe?"
7:00 p.m.-"ADC ard Christian Responsi-
biIity.
FIRST UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH and WESLEY
FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover. Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 o.m. and 11 :00 a.m.- "Amalgam for
Decaying Cities."
6:00 p.m.-Supper.
7:00 p~m.-Program: "TV, Film and Society"
with Mr. Frank Beaver of the University
Speech Dept.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Communion,
Noon Luncheon and Discussion-"Church for
the 20th Century."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL

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National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Rev. Edwin Danielson
SUNDAY
11:00 a.m.-Student conduded service.

ST. AIDEN'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway

7:30 p.m.-Bible Study
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756

services-Call

9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion
11 :00 a.m.-Coffee in the lounge

ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH

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