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September 14, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-14

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-Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, September 14, 1968

.. .e lTwo THEIMICHIGAN.DAILY...turd.y..Septem.er-14-.1-6-

-AINLG~RA OPRTO

records
Hundreds die; only five Dead

News media ask commission
to study harassment of press

FOX EASTERN THEATESinn
Fox ,uVILLAGE
375 No. MAPLE RD."769.1300
NOW SHOWING
SAT.-SUN-1:45-3:30-5: t6
' 7:00-9:00
MON. thru FRI.-7:00-9:00
1 sportive look at the
C'rtility rites (and wrongs)
of western society.

By LITTLE SHERRI FUNN
rorpse Expert
The road between spring 1967
and autumn 1968 has not been
an easy one for your ab 9ve
average, generally talented, s-
ually creative, rock 'eM sock 'em
lay-it-on-the-kids rock group.
It has been a difficult road
for them because all of a sud-
den that spring, people started
taking rock a little more ser-
iously, for better or worse, leav-
ing rock musicians without the
focal points or the heavy doses
of'tradition that earlier contem-
porary music had fed upon al-
most exclusively.
The earthquake that the West
Coast explosion and Sergeant
Pepper brought about left most
groups groveling in the dark, at-
tempting to re-define their
musical boundaries and carve
out some 'sort of valid identity
for themselves in the rock world.
Many of the groups could not
or would not make any worth-
while transition and subse-
quently have fallen by the way-
side, either by issuing incredi-
bly sterile albums, disbanding,
or sticking to the tried (tired)
and true- formula they had pre-
viously laid on the citizens.
Some of the groups, however,
have cime through unscathed,
notably Buffalo Springfield, the
Beatles °(after 'a long, long per-
iod of doubt that wasn't help-
ed much by Magical Mystery
Tour) and the Grateful Dead.
Let's get at the Dead.
The Grateful Dead contribut-
ed a large section of the fuse
that ignited the West Coast ex-

plosion I mentioned iearlier,
with their first album, Grateful'
Dead (WS 1689). They crashed
into the rock scene a year and a
half ago exuding enough pure
kinetic energy to light and heat
Wheeling, West Virginia for six
months.
In reality, their initial album
was one long song,,the song of
creative men digging what they
were doing and rolling, no
hurtling through their musical
lives. It vas plainly an album
to jump around with.
But now, after a year of re-
cording and contract hassles,
the Dead have stopped some of
the jumping with the release of
Anthem of the Sun (WS 1749).
I think there are three basic
concepts relevant to Anthem of
the Sun so let's hang anything
else we want to ,say about it
around them.
The concepts are: 1) musical
talent and proficiency, 2) ma-
turity, and 3) accessability (or
lack of it).
In order now. The musical'
proficiency of the Grateful
Dead is almost unrivaled in con-
temporary music. Individually,
Jerry Garcia on lead anid Phil
Lesh on bass Stand far above
most of their so-called competi-
tion in the field. Lesh has gone
farther than anyone except pos-
sibly the early McCartney in,'
liberating the full potential of
the electric bass.
Bob Weir and Bill Kreutz-
mann have developed into a
superlative rhythm section and
even Ron "Pigpen" McKernan
is getting into his vocals and
organ work on a higher level

NEW YORK P)-Eight news- police force in Chicago will be ton, pr
paper and broadcasting executives available to provide information Broadca
yesterday asked President John- and we shall, of course, be happy dler, pu
son's commission on violence to to cooperate fully to assist your Times;
study what they called "police commission in its work." dent of
violence aimed at repressing free The telegram was signed by Co.; Art
news coverage" of the Chicago Leonard Goldenson, president of ident a
antiwar demonstrations. the American Broadcasting Co.; York I
Dr. Milton Eisenhower, chair- Bailey K. Howard, president of editor-i]
man of the President's National the newspaper division of Field and Mrs
Commission on the Causes and Enterprises, Inc., publishing the ident of
Prevention of Violence, created Chicago Sun-Times and the Chi- for th
after the assassination of Sen. cago Daily News; Dr. Frank Stan- Newswe
Robert F. Kennedy, already has
said it will investigate the dis- e -u
order during the Democratic Na- O ri entti o n
tional Convention.
The eight newspaper and broad-
casting companies telegrammed
Eisenhower, asking that the in- 5 ~ 111'"&ne w a f]
vestigation specifically take up 7
police violence against news media.
The telegram said: (Continued from page one) freshme
"Immediately after the close of Residential College, says her accordin
the Democratic National Conven- program proved worthwhile, "I "This
tion in Chicago we called for the got myself located and had an living tc
appointment of a committee of opportunity to meet people and together
distinguished and disinterested professors," she says. temptin
citizens to investigate the treat- Elisa Patterson, also in the the pilo
ment of news reporters, photog- Residential College, says the tire stu
raphers and cameramen by mem- fall orientation of one week Orien
bers of the Chicago police force. was too long. "We really had Butts t
"It would now appear that your nothing to do," she says. i need
commission could make an impor- One specific criticism Miss Pat- Reif, "7
tant contribution by specifically teson voices is that the orienta- "almost
including this subject in its an- tion leaders explained only about many m
nounced investigation of the Chi- the Residential College and left ducted
cago disorders. We feel that the students "to find out on our own ual is n
freedom of America's news media about Ann Arbor." To in
to observe and report was serious- According to the result of the demic c
ly jeopardized during the Chicago student evaluations, however, gests ti
disorders and that this repression Butts concludes "the level of satis- might 4
of freedom of the press should be faction is generally pretty high." registra
publicly scrutinized. Most of the criticisms on the procedu
"Accordingly, we specifically and evaluationswere on an "individ- that she
respectfully request that your ual" basis, Butts adds. Some stu- up stay
study of violence in America in- dents, for example, didn't like the student
clude the subject of police violence food, didn't like their leaders, or even ta
aimed at repressing free news wanted more mixers. BobI
coverage of such events as the Butts explains the orientation tion lea
Chicago demonstrations. office is trying to follow through prograr
"Our reporters, photographers on the acquaintances students "a little
and cameramen ;who were beaten make during the program by ers took
and harassed by members of the filling housing assignments, and he exp]

esident of the Columbia
sting System; Otis Chan-
blisher of the Los Angeles
Julian Goodman, presi-
the National Broadcasting
thur Ochs Sulzberger, pres-
nd publisher of the New
Times; Hedley Donovan.
in-chief of Time magazine,
s. Katharine Graham, pres-
the Washington Post Co.,
e Washington Post and
ek magazine.
oureau
proachi,.
n courses like English 123
ng to orientation groups.
means that some will be
ogether and t king courses
x," Butts says. "We're at-
g to spread the merits of'
ot program across the en-
dent body."
tation leaders agree with
that more personalization
ed in theprogram. Wanda
1L, -says the program is
t too structured." Too
neetings, she says, are con-
en masse and the individ-
not recognized.
mprove the program's aca-
counseling, Miss Reif sug-
,hat the.,counseling office
offer more explanation of
tion and course selection
ares. Miss fteif explains
t and other leaders "wound
ing up until 4 a.m. telling
s about courses we hadn't
ken."
eff, '69, another orienta-
ader, admits the existing
m is "pretty good" although
impersonal." "Most lead-
k an interest in their kids,"
lains.

f CAUTION:
THIS MOTION PICTURE
SHOULD BE KEPT OUT OF
THE REACII OF CHII.DRENI

Grateful alive :Yery much Dead

_ __ ;

Education in France
to see vast reforms

than before. Musical proficiency.
Is valuable, however, only be-
cause it broadens the scope of
what a group can accomplish
and visualize for itself. And vis-
ion depends on maturity.
The Dead albums surpass so
many of the others released
during the same period-of time
because the group has learned
to follow the shortest possible
> route to their destination. They
say everything they have to say
quickly, generally as simply as
possible, and get off your turn-
table.
For instance, it is interesting
to look at what Jefferson Air-
plane did with electronic effects
on After Bathing at Baxter's
and compare it to the studio ef-
fects on Anthem of the Sun.
The former group never knew
when to stop turning dials and
hence created a hodge-podge of
meaningless gimmicks, while the

latter used electronic sounds to
subtly enhance the albums
total effect. Maturity does that
for groups.
Accessability. The Grateful
Dead are one of a dwindling
number of musical aggrega-
tions that refuses to give their
audience something for noth-
ing. They don't sugar-coat their
sound, their album covers, or
their image. They are saying
to their audience, "If you hon-
estly come along, you'll love it
and we'll be good to you. But
if you want it free, go to hell."
The Dead have learned all of
the rules, melodically and
structurally, and now they are
taking no small pleasure in
breaking them One by one. It
makes for a difficult music and
a difficult concept. But if you
take some time, they will let
you in on where they are head-
ed, and it's a nice place to go.

20th Century-Fox presents
DEBORAH DAVID
KERR NIYEN
i n FIELDER COOK'S
d th e ,
SMA
A KAHN-HARPER PRODUCTION' Color by De lure.

~1

... -h :h 'n.'::' .'.
Something To Swop?
Try Daily Classifieds

PARIS (A) -French Education
Minister Edgar Faure, in a con-
cession to many student demands,
outlined last night a set of broad
reforms that would make unpre-
cedented changes In the tradition-
bound French university system.
But Faure, who was chosen by
President Charles de Gaulle to
take over the ministry at the
height of France's student disor-
ders-in June, insisted that exams
scheduled for this fall be given
despite any student attempt to
block them.
He promised that next year's
examinations would be radically,
ordered
destroyed
DALLAS, Tex. (,")-U.S. Dist.
Judge Sarah T. Hughes ordered a
Iallas-based diet pill firm yester-
day to destroy all dosages con-
taming thyroid and digitalis. The
decison could .have a staggering
effect on the weight reducing
medication industry.
Many weight reduction pills
have thyroid or digitalis or both.
1 Judge.Hughes ruled that "any
comrbination of thyroid and digi-
,talis" cannot be sold in inter-
state commerce.
The ruling was in the form of
- an inWunction against the Lanpar
"o-, a firm that manufactures diet
pills for treatment of obesity.
The judge further stated in the
injunction that Lanpar Co. must
not s ell digitalis in interstate
commerce for the treatment of
obesity.
She also ordered certain label-
ing rules in the use of thyroid.
The FDA has already seized
-rillions of dosage units of thyroid
nd digitalis preparations on
grounds that they- are misbranded
,Wjth "false and misleading label
ing claims. They are included in
"rainbow pill diet programs,
named for the many colors of the
pills.
" The agency says the prepara-
tions "are not safe or effective in
the treatment of obesity and are
dangerous when dispensed for
weight reduction."
"Asst. U.S. Atty. Ken Mighell
said, "This will have an impact
on all of the other cases and I
think will probably result in a
change for the entire diet pill
industry."
3020 Washtenaw. Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
IN COLD
BLOOD
Wrtenaorthe scrennd dreced by

modified, but said the exams post-
poned because of student -Vnrest
last spring had to be taken now,
and would have to follow the tra-
ditional pattern. The university
examination system has been one
of the chief targets of student
protesters.
Faure announced these changes
starting next November:
-The creation of a university
experimental center where 7,500
students, all volunteers, will begin
a new broad liberal arts curri-
culum, similar to that employed
in many American universities.
Until now, French university cur-
,riculum has been narrowly con-
fined, to the student's chosen spe-
cialty. 'Curriculum reform has
been one of the principal points
of contention by students.
Other inovations promised for
the experimental center include
the end of some exams, and broad
student participation in campus
life and administration.
-At another suburban univer-
sity center, 1,500 literature stu-
dents now at the Sorbonne will
take scientific courses to encour-
age cross-pollenization of aca-
demic disciplines. At the same,
time, science students will be en-
couraged to take arts and letters
studies. This, too, was termed a
pilot project.
-Two more centers will be
opened where studies will be or-
ganized on a step-scale basis, per-
mitting studies to be terminated
at 2-, 4-, or 6-year intervals. The
principal innovation here is the
cutoff at two years, equipping a
less ambitious student for employ-
ment. One of these centers will
be established in the former
headquarters building of , the
North Atlantic Treaty Organiza-
tion in Paris.
-The Paris faculty of medicine,
now concentrated into one vast,
overcrowded center, will be split
into 10 separate autonomous med-
ical schools. This will permit most
students to start their practical
training in hospitals beginning
with their third year of medical
school. Many medical , students
had been unable to undertake hos-
pital training because of the cen-
tralization, overcrowding and ad-
ministrative backlog.

TWICE DAILY
at 1:30 and 7:30

The hanging was the best show in town.
But they made two mistakes. They hung 4
the wrong m-an and they didn't finish the job.

Pentagon announces early

F
b
f
c
s
I'.
a
1:
C
t
n
f
a
v
y
s
F
e

+

discharge of Navy enlistees
WASHINGTON (P) - The was "an excuse to gain extra
Pentagon, in an action described manpower" to meet demands of
by one congressman as "disgrace- the Vietnam war.
ful," has announced early dis- Schweiker, who has written a
charges for 30,000 Navy reservists complaining letter to Secretary of
serving two-year active duty en- Defense Clerk M. Clifford, said
listments. the January activation of nearly
The Pentagon said the move 15,000 Navy and Air Force reserv-
announced yesterday would result ists was an "outrageous shame"
in a saving of $48 million in the and said the men have been per-
current fiscal year, thus helping forming only routine chores.
to meet federal spending, cuts The men who will benefit by
mandated by Congress. the Pentagon's "early out" plan
The plan, however, does not af- are individuals who voluntarily,
fect thousands of Army, Air Force signed up for a Navy reserve pro-
and National Guard personnel gram referred to as the "two by
who were activated early t h is six" tour.
year in the wake of North Korea's This requires two years active
seizure of the USS Pueblo. duty plus four years in a reserve
Rep. Richard S. Schweiker, (R- status. The usual Navy enlistment
Pa.), a member of the H o u s e is a flat four years active service.
Armed Services Committee, label- Some reservists in this program
ed the plan "an outrageous in- will be allowed to cut their two-
justice" and suggested that the year active duty period by as much

Friday and Saturday50 All Other $00
Eves. and All Day $250Performances
Su~nday Promne
A. SIZZLER FROMFRANCE.
Therese
and Isabelle' will be the most
talked-about movie around."
-WINS RAMO
- 1/
16a RADLEY M 1GEn
.rJ 66Production
starring ESSY PERSSON (",AWoman")as'Therese
Order Your Daily Now-

V

qq

t

callup during the Pueblo crisis

as one year.

CINEMA II

CINEMA 11
PRESENTS
"REQUIEM
FOR A
HEAVYWEIGHT"

A LEONARD FREEMAN PRODUCTION co s otE
E D BEGLEY -.e
- ER SEVENS PAT MINGLE as Judge Fenton

Program
Information
Dial
662-6264,

ll't E
ATAl

SHOWS AT
1:00-3:00
5:05-7:10
9 :20

MOM"

~

Anthony Quinn
Screen Play:
Fri.-Sot. 7:00-9

Jackie Gleason
Rod Serling

:00 P.M.

Aud.
I.D. Req.

A

NOTICE:
BECAUSE OF THE STAGGERING RESPONSE TO ZORBA LAST WEEK, THE Vth FORUM HAS MADE
SPECIAL ARRANGEMENTS TO BRING HIM BACK AGAIN BEFORE HE RETIRES. YES, THE OLD
MAN IS BEING RETIRED-THE MOVIE IS BEING WITHDRAWN FROM CIRCULATION LATER
THIS MONTH-THIS MAY BE
YOUR LAST CHANCE TO SEE

ZORBA 1

THE

GREEK

PRIOR TO BROADWAY!

SEPTEMBER 17-29

MOLlERE'S
- :
r t

ACADEMY
AWARDS

"'ZORBA THE GREEK'
IS A DECIDED MUST-SEE!
Anthony Quinn's Zorba possesses all the energies
and urges of the great ones of history and myth."
--Bosley Crowther, New York Times
"A grand uproarious Bacchanalian bash."

O i

ANTHONY QUINN

-Time Magazine
66 sa~s a ssi sfs- ganef rrtan i .7,f e Attmlm.

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