100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 05, 1968 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Thursday, September 5, 1968

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Three

Thl4rsday, September 5, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Three

TROUBLE IN ISRAEL:
Newest sabotage in Tel Aviv
prompts violent Israeli reaction

-Associated Press
Ford: An alternative systemr
Ford ask changes
in presidential vote

> TEL AVIV (P) - Saboteurs set
off three bombs in a crowded Tel
Aviv bus terminal yesterday and
crowds of angry, revengeful
Israelis roamed the station and
the ancient port of Jaffa attack-
ing Arabs. The explosives, hidden
in litter bins, sent shrapnel-like
fragments of metal flying into
crowds of waiting passengers, kill-
ing one person and wounding
459 others.
It was. the worst sabotage inci-
dent in Israel's largest city in 10
years.
BORDER TROUBLE
Fresh border skirmishes w e r e
reported, meanwhile, along the
Jordanian and Syrian fronts.
Police arrested fourrArab sus-
pects who tried to flee through a
crowd of cursing and kiking Is-
raelis after the blasts rocked the
terminal.
The crowds pummeled and
bloodied at least one Arab and
surged'against police as they es-
corted about 50 frightened Arabs
-young and old-from the bus
station to police headquarters for
protection.
ISRAELI REVENGE
About three hours later, several
hundred Israeli swarmed through
the streets of the port city of
Jaffa, near Tel Aviv, and beat up
Arab residents and a humber of
Arabs visiting from ocupied ter-
ritories. They smashed the wind-
shields of Arab-owned cars and-
shouted epithets.
"They're getting what they de-
serve." one enraged Jew told a
newsman._
Some members of the crowds in
Jaffa struggled with about 50
Israeli policemen who rounded up
Arab residents and formed a
cordon around them.
One Moroccan Jewish youth at-
tackek a: fellow Moroccan Jew
with a knife, cutting his arm. The
injured man, a butcher, frantical-
ly tore off his shirt and yelled:
"Look at these scars, you idiot. I
got these fighting for our coun-
try."
The knife wielder apologized
and ran off.
JERUSALEM BLASTS
A series of bomb blasts in Jeru-
salem last month wounded nine
persons and set off anti-Arab riots
by revenge-seeking Jewish youths.
The Israel army announced
another shooting duel with Jor-
danian troops across the North
Beisan Valley border, troubled by
almost daily exchanges of gunfire.
A spokesman said the Jordan-
ians opened up with light arms
fire and the exchange lasted 50
minutes. After it died down, the
spokesman said, the Jordanians
opened up again with light arms
and mortar and a 10-minute ex-
change ensued. No Israeli casual-
ties were reported.
NIGHT BATTLE
In Damascus, a Syrian army
spokesman reported an Israeli
halftrack was destroyed by fire
during a 5-minute battle across
the cease-fire line Tuesday night.
Israel also announced 'it was
holding for investigation 16 Arabs
seized six days ago when two
Egyptian fishing vessels asserted-
ly strayed into Israeli waters
"close to the Sinai area" east of
Port Said.

the official viewpoint
Czechoslovak government
printed or broadcast,

of the'
may be

Niverians

ASK UNDERSTANDING
National Assembly Chairman
JosefhSmrovsky issued an appeal
< in the Communist party news pa-
per Rude Pravo, asking the peo-
ple to understand "measures taken
to fulfill responsibly the obliga-
tions of the Moscow accord."
He said it was "absolutely nec-
essary for pur side to fulfill point
by point the Moscow accord so
Associated Press that the other side will proceed
-s likewise"

The talks and the killing go on,

V shell more capitals,
deride presid ential race'

By The Associated Press

forms on Vietnam and said

Stiff censorship
hits Czech media
Russians promise troop witlidrawaI
if Czechs follow new regulations
PRAGUE (N - Rigid censorship was clamped on Czecho-
slovakia's newspapers and broadcasters yesterday, banning
any news reports that "could be considered as criticism" by
the Soviet-led occupation forces.
The rules prohibited use of the terms "occupants" and
"occupation"; reprinting of critical commentaries from
abroad; "popularizing" the idea of neutrality, and playing up
the activities of the United Nations Security Council. Only

Haunted by Chicago and hound-
ed by the judgment day coming in
November, a reconvened Congress
#t wad challenged yesterday to re-
form the United States' political
system.
Sen. Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.),
introduced a proposal to set up a
federal commission to work out a
new way of choosing presidential
candidates,
"I think a majority of the Amer-
ican public, regardless ,of party, is
fed up with our quadrennial po-
litical party conventions, Nelson
said.
On the Republican side, House'
GOP leader Gerald R. F o r d of
Michigan called or abolition of
+ the electoral college, direct pop-
ular election of the president, and
a' reexamination of the way dele-
gates to national conventions are
selected.
Ford told a news conference he
thought the Democratic conven-
tion in Chicago "was a pretty sad

display of the way to act at a
convention and the way to run
one."
But Ford seemed more concern-
ed that t h e third-party .candi-
dacy of former Alabama governor
George C. Wallace could throw
the election into t h e House of
~Representatives.
The two previous times this
happened, in 1800 and 1824, it led
to "deals and schemes" which,
Ford said, marked a sordid chap-
ter in American history.
Ford said he thought the Amer-
ican Bar Association. p 1 a n for
popular election of the president
with a run-off, if needed, "has a
lot of merit."
House Speaker John W. McCor-
mack (D-Mass.), criticized Ford's
remarks about the Democratic
convention as "in poor taste."
McCormack told a news con-
ference the Republicans had troub-
les during their own convention,
in Miami Beach.

Communist forces shelled two candidate's mean to press on
more South Vietnamese provincial the war.
capitals, including Nha Trang, The barrages against
command center for American Trang and Quang Ngai, bott
forces in the central highlands, cated along the South China
military spokesman reported yes- coast, followed a pattern over
terday. past several days in which
In Paris, North Vietnam in- enemy has reverted. tolon
jected acid comment on the U.S. tance attacks after having su
presidential campaign into the ed heavy losses in two week
continuing peace talks yesterday, ground assaults.
It denounced both parties' plat- One South Vietnamese po
Commtt1ee to probe
Chicago disruptions
WASHINGTON (U) - President with police, with hundreds o
Johnson's anti-violence commis- juries and arrests resulting.
sion will 'investigate the disorder A controversy continues
that swept Chicago during the whether police action amou
Democratic National Convention, to unwarranted brutality or
its chairman announced yesterday. a necessary restraint to pre:
Dr. Milton Eisenhower said a order.
special investigative task force of Eisenhower said the Chi
the commission would also look developments amounted to
into "other recent events such as lence of very large proporti
the outbreak of shootings in and fell within the jurisdi
Cleveland." of the commission.
Eisenhower told newsmen the The panel, officially titled
study also might include rioting National Commission on
in Miami, Fla., during the GOP Causes and Prevention of
National Convention but only, lence, was established by Joh
Chicago and Cleveland were men- after the fatal shooting of
tioned specifically in the commis- Robert F. Kennedy,
sion announcement. At its third meeting, whil
Eisenhower said the commission At itsthrd tig whici
hadno dscuse 'heChicago in- gan yesterday, the commi:
hadinot discussed the hiao unanimously elected U.S. DF
vestigation with President John-unimsleecdU..D Court Judge A, Leon Hig
son and acted on its own initi- botham Jr. of Philadelphia
ative. vice chairman.
Anti-war demonstrations staged After the closed session, E
by youth groups during the con- hower announced the commi
vention in Chicago led to clashesl i

both
with
Nha
h lo-
Sea
r the
ithe
k-dis-
ffer-
ks of
olice-

man was killed and 21 civilians
and 17 allied soldiers were wound-
ed in the shelling of Nha Trang,
military spokesmen reported.
Nha Trang, 200 miles northeast
of Saigon, is a former seaside re-
sort and the capital of Khanh
Hoa Province. It is the headquart-
ers of the U.S. 1st Field Force,
commanding all U.S. forces in the
central highlands.
Ambassador Xuan Thuy called

Foreign Minister Jiri Hajek, re-
ported to be "somewhere in Swit-
zerland," was expected to be oust-
ed following t h e resignation of
Deputy Premier Ota "Sik. The So-
viet government newspaper Izves-
tia published another attack on
Sik yesterday, calling him "one
of the most odious figures" in the
liberation movement in Prague.
Izvestia contended Sik "want-
ed to turn the country onto the
capitalist road and dep ndence
upon the capitalist power:"
DENY EXODUS
Rude Pravo published new de-
nials of mass flights by Czecho-
slovak intellectuals, and the Min-,
istry of the Interior issued a state-
ment that no measures had been
taken to "restrict personal free-
dom of culture workers."
Czechoslovaks in Prague seem-
ed to be doing their utmost to
comply with Soviet demands in
hopes that the occupation troops
will keep their, promise to leav
when the situation "normalizes,
but many people asked the ques-
tion who will decide when nor-
malcy is attained?,
Sources said t h a t Communist
party boss Alexander Dubcek
might retain Sik, Hajek and oth-
er chief liberals in secondary po-
sitions out of the Soviets' target
range.
One indication of this was an,
announcement in Rude Pravo that
Cestmir Cisar, ousted party secre-:
tary and another main target of
Soviet criticism, would travel soonj
to Slovakia as chairman of the
Czech Council." the regional phr-
liament.,

capture Aba
from rebels
By The Associated Press
The Nigerian federal govern-
ment claimed' yesterday it had
captured Aba, the capital of seces-
sionist Biafra, and "care of the
civilians i that'area is already
in progress."
The government communique
did not say how many civilians
remained in the city. It was re-
ported virtually deserted after the
federal soldiers began their final
assault against the secessionists
in mid-August.
Thousands of civilians have
been reported starving to death
in the shrinking area held by the
Biafrans and- blocked by federal
troops.
A Nigerian army splokesman
said federal troops had captured
two more villages, Owutu and
Okigwe, and were closing in on
a Biafran airstrip at Obilago.
August Lindt, the Swiss diplo-
mat coordinating Red Cross relief
operations, flew to Biafra yester-
day to make arrangements for
daylight mercy flights to the
starving war victims.
On Tuesday the Nigerian gov-
ernment approved dayliglt flights
for 10 days starting Thursday.
But there is a conflict over which
airstrip should be used.
So far the Biafrans have re-
fused ,to open up land corridors
for relief supplies, saying they
might be used by federal troops.
In Port Harcourt, a Nigerian
firing squad executed Tuesday a
Nigerian lieutenant convicted of
shooting an unarmed young Bia-
fran.
The lieutenant was arrested
Monday after being identified by
British television cameraman who
filed his shooting of a Biafran
,whose hands were tied behind his
back. That shooting wast shown
Monday night to viewers in Brit-
ain.

- -Vice President Hubert H. Hum-
phrey, the Democratic. nominee,.
"an apologist" for President John-
son's war policy.
Thuy asserted that "the posi-,
tions embodied in the two plat-
forms recently passed show that;
they still refuse to draw practical
lessons from their recent defeats
and to move toward a correct so-
lution of the Vietnam problem.."

over Harriman replied:
unted read the platforms
was parties with a full
serve their meaning and t
implications.
icago They both demon
"vio- disputable fact tha
ons," of the United States
ction ed to peace."

"You should.
of the two
knowledge of
their political
state the in-
t the people
are, dedicat-

Buddy Guy Blues Band
' at

dthe
the
Vio-
anson
Sen.
h be-
ssion
strict
ggin-
aas
isen-
ssion

R
1
I

National news. roundup

By The Associated Press

FRI.
SAT.
SUN.

8 P.M.

"Lord have Mercy!"
--Michigan Daily

Admission $2.00 at the door
(01.75 after second set)

1421 Hill St.
8:30 P.M.

OPENS TONIGHT
with all-time favorite

woul conauct a specia investiga-I
tion "to as certain the facts of re-
cent violent events and develop-
ments having major importance
to the commission's work on which
an adequate factual record has
not yet been made."
"The new group," the statement1
continued, "will devote first at-
tention to last week's event in

DOVER, Del. - Delaware Gov.
Charles L. Terry Jr. said yester-
qay that the NationalrGuard
stopped at least two riots" in
Wilmington by its presence there
the entire summer, and indicated
the troops are to remain on duty
for sofme time come.
Terry pointed to the arrest of
six alleged members of a "Black
Liberation Army" during target
practice and discovery of an arms
cache, and said: "What I've been
telling people since April is now'
coming to light."
He referred to opposition to his

CHICAGO-Richard M. Nixon's
presidential campaign jumped off
to a spectacular start in Chicago
yeserday with a gigantic down-
town, crowd roaring applause and
struggling to shake his hand.
Solid walls of spectators, six and
eight deep, lined the zigzag route
taken by Nixon's motorcade from
the southern edge of the Loop,
downtown center of the city, to
his hotel.
* * *
CAPE KENNEDY - Three as-
tronauts scheduled to rocket into
their spacecraft yesterday for a
countdown rehearsal similar to
the one in which the Apollo 1
pilots were killed.
With the spacecraft door open
wide and rescue crews standing
by, Navy Capt. Walter M. Schirra
Jr., Air Force Maj. Donn F. Eisele'
and civilian Walter Cunningham
entered their Apollo 7 spacecraft
at 12:50 p.m. EDT for the final
segment of a simulated count-

dtown and several hours of in-
flight rehearsal.
The trio is scheduled to rocket
into earth orbit Oct. 11 for an
11-day flight needed to prove that
Apollo spaceships can safely carry
men to the moon.
* * *-
WASHINGTON - The Justice
Department turned up the heat
on racketeers and gamblers during
fiscal 1968, Atty. Gen. Ramsey
Clark reported yesterday.
- Tile iost rapid rise in the Jus-
tice Deparement's success began
in fiscal 967, Clark 'said, when
what he called. a strike force-a
team of attorneys and investiga-
tors from key federal agencies
moving comprehensively against
organized crime in metropolitan
areas-was launched.
He said he is convinced a "vig-
orous follow-through can achieve
virtual elimination of organized
crime which has corrupted Amer-
ican life for decades."

GENERATION
represents the literary
artistic university
community
BE PART OF IT
MASS MEETING
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 4, 1968
2nd floor of the
Student Publications Building
420 Maynard St.

,

Chicago and other recent events decision to keep Guardsmen in
such as the outbreak of shootings Wilmington after they helped
in Cleveland." quell riots there in early April.

Y

soy waste

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
FRIDAY, SEPT. 6th

"Something comes through Bob White's songs that you don't
find much these days, a deep-felt optimism. Singing songs that
capture the deepest feeling of people. He captures and keeps his
audience."$ - The Michigan Daily
$1.00 cover includes FREE refreshments!

A

noon lunchon

25c

- NATIONAL GEN ~AL COR'IORATJON _
HFOX EASTERLt EATRES If
OVER FOR VILLAGE
375 No.MAPLE RD,-769.1300

-WED.-FRI.
7:15-9:15
SAT-SUN.
1:30-3:25-5:20
7:15-9:15

. rr

TONIGHT and TOMORROW-7 i00 and 9:05
SERCEI EISENSTEIN S'

PROF. WILLIAM HAYS, Dean College LSA
"Issues in Higher Education and the Campus"

I

p
_- - - K

'I

I I

Speed Your Way
Better Pay

!I

-

NEXT-"PRUDENCE AND THE PILL"

11

i a
.. .:

4~1 ~'iI WRI

DIAL
8-6416

Educational

Institutions Large Research

Establishments, Government Agencies,
and Many Small Businesses
are in constant need of:
* Executive Secretaries * Stenographers

"EXCEPTIONALLY POWERFUL, IN
BOTH CONCEPTION AND
EXECUTION! A HIGH LEVEL OF
CREATIVE CINEMA!"
-Time Magazine
"DAZZLING AND TO THE POINT!"
-Penelgpe Gilliatt, The New Yorker
"BRILLIANT! REMARKABLE!"
_ Jn --J Mnsnpnrensrn Newsweek

I

9 Office Machine Operators

* Receptionists,

. - ____ ________ ___....,-.,---..

11 1

I

: 1

II

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan