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September 05, 1968 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-05

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, September 5, 1968

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Thursday, September 5, 1968

Marchers protest editor's arrest,
lan new demonstrations today
(Continued from Page 1)
Livingston, Oakland and Wayne
counties, the state police and the
police departments in six nearby
cities. All were on call in case of
serious violence.o
Washtenaw County officers also
brought in at least four trained'
police dogs while the marchers
congregated near the building.
The Sheriff's Department called
in deputized citizens who usually r >
serve only in emergency situa-
tions.
Washtenaw County Prosecutor
William Delhey said more than 30
deputies with helmets and riot
sticks were there because Harvey>
felt the tactical security of thet
jail was fhreatened.}
Delhey was called at his home A
by Harvey after the march began.
Delhey said his purpose in being{
there was to insure that the proce-
dural laws of the state were ;.
obeyed in the event that violence
broke out and arrests were made.

Editor
arrested,
(Continued from Page 1)
he walked past a group of de-
puties and attempted to open the
door, witnesses said.
At this point, they added, he
was told he could not enter. Wit-
nesses went on to quote Wildstrom
as asking the deputies, "Isn't this
a public building? Isn't it open
until 5:30?" After the deputies
reiterated their refusal to allow

F t

Soviets begin movement
to stamp out liberalism'

Wildstrom to enter, he said, "I

have business in there. I want to
see the sheriff."
Wildstrom said later last night
that he wished to see Harvey "to
protest harassment of Daily re-
porters by the sheriff's deputies."
On advice of counsel, Wildstrom
declined any further statement
other than that concerning possi-
ble court action in his own behalf.
After declaring his intention to
enter the building to the deputies,
witnesses said, one of them re-
plied: "You're the sane kid who
gave me lip yesterday. I'm not
taking any more shit from you."
(Wildstrom had also been at the
County Bldg. Tuesday to protest
earlier harassment of Daily re-
porters.)

II

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press News Analysis
An " immense propaganda
campaign is in progress in the
Soviet Union, clearly aimed at
tightening Communist party
control and stamping out tend-
encies toward liberal thinking.
Reminiscent of the Stalin days,
it suggests the extent to which
the Kremlin was, shaken by
events in Czechoslovakia.
Youth is the main target in
a drive keyed to the 100th
birthday anniversary of Lenin,
Bolshevism's founder. It indi-
cates that Soviet leaders are
worried about their own people
as well as the Czechoslovaks.
This concern seems not to
center on any possibility of a
convulsive movement for liber-
alization in the Prague style,
but rather about a prospect of
slow but steady erosion threat-
ening the."Socialist" system.
Since Lenin was born in April
1870 the anniversary is 20
months away. But the cam-
paign has been going on since
early this year. It increased in
tempo as Russian and Soviet
bloc troops prepared to occupy
Czechoslovakia.
Last m o n t h the Soviet
party, in a decree on obser-
vation of the Lenin anniver-
sary, de m a n d e d a total
propaganda-education drive to
strengthen party authority and
crack down on "anti-Socialist"
elements.
A few days ago Pravda car-
ried a long article warning that
dark forces allied with revision-
ists were stepping up ideologi-

cal warfare against "Socialist
achievements," attempting to
subvert the system from with-
in. Pravda said these forces
included "reactionaries of all
types, Fascists, right Socialists,
nationalists, chauvinists and
Zionists." The reference to
Zionists fitted in with Soviet
press attacks on Czechoslovak
figures with Jewish back-
grounds.
The "dark forces," said the
Communist party paper, try to
represent developments in So-
viet literature, art and econom-
ic reform as "divergence, pro-
test and discontent," in at-
tempts to sow mistrust of the
Soviet party and weaken inter-
nal durability.
, Obviously, this will be a sps-
tained campaign. In the back-
ground are such things as con-
cern over a rising tide of crime
and corruption in the Soviet
Union, an ideological drive in
the schools to implant unques-
tioning loyalty to the system.
warnings to writers to, toe the
mark and warning that nation-
alism will not be tolerated in
non-Russian Soviet republics.
Pravda harked back to the
April meeting of the party's
Central Committee which dis-
cussed "present problems of the
international situation and the
struggle of the Communist par-
ty of the Soviet Union for the
solidarity of the world Com-
munist movement." Actually,
much of that plenum proved to
be about internal Soviet prob-
lems.
In advance of the meeting,

Leonid I. Brezhnev. the party
chief, told the Moscow party
organization of a sharpened
ideological struggle. He said
that "no political indifference
or passiveness nor any neutral-
ity in relation to aims pursued
by the enemy" would be coun-
tenanced.
"Bourgeois ideologists," said
Brezhnev, "still hope somehow
to influence the world outlook
of particular groups of Soviet
people and to blunt their class
awareness . . . Sometimes they
catch in their net persons avid
for self-publicity, those willing
to make themselves known as
loudly as possible . . . The rene-
gades cannot expect to go un-
punished."
That seemed aimed at writ-
ers.who had been seeking more
freedom of expression. Some
writers have been imprisoned
or placed on the proscribed
list.
The Soviet press for several
months has been warning
against what it calls "a dirty
wave of anti-communism,"
spearheaded by such agencies as
the Voice of America and the
British Broadcasting Corp. The
newspaper Trud said cultural
and trade relations "have be-
come the most widespread
channels for dispatch of anti-
Soviet books, brochures, pam-
phlets, records, tapes and even
films."
The warnings are blunt, tes-
tifying to the state of Kremlin
nerves, and the threat is clear:
where necessary, Stalinist
methods will be revived.

1,

Det. Lt.. Eugene Staudenmeier
of the Ann Arbor Police Depart-
ment strolled through the crowd
for a short time. He radioed for
one patrol car to handle the traf-
fie-mostly sheriff's deputies
that was going in and out of the:-----
parking lot, Many demonstratorsj
were crossing in front of the en-SUPP
trance and several were almost hit
by cars hurrying through.
Staudenmeier explained his de-
partment's reaction depended on ;
the circumstances. "If there is
violence or there is a crime con-
mnitted," he said, "then this would
constitute illegal assembly." He iO
added that attempting to move
onto the county land could con-
stitute trespass. ByI
The marching and shouting con- Eight of
tinued sporadically until aboutsoriesl
9:30 p.m. A light drizzle begansororiies
then and, 15 minutes later most ed anti-dis
of the crowd had dispersed. stating tha
As the marching continued, ad- a system o
ditional deputies joined those whoormnai
were already in the parking lot. ommendati
By 9:30 they formed a shoulder to new membe
shoulder in line in front of the Six hous
parking lot entrance. All were red by the
wearing helmets and some sported tions from
extra long "riot"'sticks that had and nine ot
large knobs on-each end. to take con
Demonstrators carried signs The stat
saying "End police brutality," a resolution
"End police tyranny" and "Down Association
with Harvey." way for th
t

Daily-Andy Sacks

Marchers picket county jail
ORT PANHEL:

Witnesses reported that when
Wildstrom attempted to reply to
the deputy's comment, he was
i s sn reso utio n shoved backward, struck on the
chin, and then knocked to the
ground. Then, they said, several
deputies proceeded to '"knee him
t- m-- tn to a umveto otin the sides and back."
One witness, an Ann Arbor

LISA STEVENS
fthe University's 23
st night returned sign-
crimination statements
t they would not utilize
f required alumni rec-
ons for the pledging of
ers.

or religious bias in the Greek' sys-
tem.
Panhel's resolution, refusing to
accept as valid a binding alumni
veto on any n4w member; was the
first of its kind in the national
Greek ystem.
Panhel's move met with con-
siderable ~ Oposition from the Na-

housewife, said she saw one deputy
Sorosis, Delta Phi Epsilon, Delta "scrape his (Wildstrom's) face
Sigma Phi, Phi Sigma Sigma and against a concrete ledge."

es, however, were bar- tional Panhellenic Council, of
eir national organiza- which it is a member, and a num-
signing the statement ber of local houses were faced
;her houses were unable with a choice between breaking
nclusive action. with their national organizations
ements, in response to on the question and losing their
n passed by Panhellenic recognition, or refusing to comply
last Jan. 24, opened with Panhel's move in support of
e elimination of racial University policy,
The resolution was an effort by
Panhel to restructure the sorority
system internally, rather than to
have the changes imposed upon
them 'by Student Government
ICouncil, which bars discrimination
in the selection of members for
all student oi'ganizations.

" f
.
r
i
r
.
G

Barred by their national organ-
izations from signing the resolu-
tion were: Alpha Delta Pi, Alpha
Epsilon Phi, Kappa Alpha Theta,
Kappa Delta, Kappa Kappa GaMi-
ma and Zeta Tau Alpha.
Alpha Delta Phi, Kappa Alpha
Theta, Kappa Kappa Gamma and
Zeta Tau Alpha were among the
six houses who voted against the
resolution when it was proposed
last January.
However, some members at last
night's President's Council meet-
ing questioned the motives of
houses who claimed to be ham-
strung by their nationals. "I'm
sure," said one girl, "that if it
camne to the choice between stand-
ing with Panhel and standing
with their national, they'd go with
the national. They avoid the main
issue of discrimination; they just
want to protect themselves."
Panhel president Ellen Heyboer,
'69, remained adament in her sup-
port of the resolution, saying, "We
should stand behind it on princi-
ple-regardless of who is knock-j
ing at our door."c
Janet Phlegar, '69, chairman of
the Membership Committee, com-
menting on last January's initial
support of the resolution, added:
"We all voted on this. We all
wanted to see the changes made."
"I don't know how the rest of
you feel," Margie Widner, '69,
president of Collegiate Sorosis,
said, "but I'm very disappointed."

Handcuffs were then clamped
on Wildstrom and he was led
away to the County Jail, where he
was booked on the assault charges
and held for 90 minutes before
being released on bond.
After his release from the jail,
Wildstrom was treated for bruises
and abrasions at University Hos-
pital.
Wildstrom, a senior, has workedj
for The Daily for three years. For
the past two summers, he has
been an employe of the Associated
Press in Detroit, where he worked
as a general assignment reporter.
During his first summer with the
AP, he helped cover the Detroit
riots.
-NOW
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ANN ARBOR DANCE THEATRE
FALL SCHEDULE OF CLASSES
MON DAYS
Beginning September 9
Ann Arbor High School
Recreation Room

MODERN DANCE:

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Nancy Armendari
Selma Odom
REPERTORY 8:30- 10:00
Ann Young
Beginning September 1 2x
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BEGINNING MODERN DANCE:
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Nancy Armendariz
SATURDAYS
Beginning October 5
Burns Park School Auditorium
BALLET: 10:00-1 1':00 A.M.
Nancy Abbey

OUTRAGED
FATHERS
AND THE
PILL-
Do fathers have a right to
know when the pills are being
used? Or should they be kept
in the dark.
"PRUDENCE AND THE PILI"
The first comedy about the
pil(-from 20th Century-Fox.
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Panhellenic Association voted
last January to end all mechan-
isms for discrimination by Sept. 1
of this year. At that time theyj
stated that they would withdraw ;
recognition from those sororities;
which did not comply with the
resolution.
Unrecognized sororities do not:
have rush privileges on this cam-
pus. However, at last evening's
meeting, there wes no indication
that such action would be taken.
Those sororities which returned
the signed statements were: Al-
pha Chi Omega, Alpha Omicron
Pi, Alpha Kappa Alpha, Collegiate '

I

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