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September 01, 1968 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-01

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Nine

Sunday, September 1$ 1968

E I 'SPORTULGI-T
One of the most encouraging features of the new Athletic Direc-
torship is Don C6nham's attitude toward non-varsity athletics.
Taking up the AD reins last July, he fell heir to one of the t
biggest problems plaguing the department-a shortage of facili-d
ties for the Intramurals and club sports programs. it
In the short space of two months, while still new to the office,
he has become intimately acquainted with the situation, mainly as o
the result of almost daily conferences with one or another of the n
concerned parties.n
But besides being a willing listener, he is a doer. The renovationg
of Wines Field was the first concrete step taken to alleviate matters.h
The initial move a month ago to pave the northwest corner of
Wines brought a protest from the Michigan Sport Clubs Associationt
(MSCA) who felt this was being done for "Revelli, Inc." and went f
against the 'policy of keeping Wines Field strictly for recreation a
purposes.y
Further communication since, and a proposed field layout which f
includes two regulation rugby-soccer fields, have somewhat relieved t
the dissatisfaction for the moment.c
Many of them now seem willing to adopt a "wait and see" policy.s
"I'm willing to give him (Canham') a chance," agrees Bob Gillon,
president of the LacrosseClub and pro-tem chairman of the MSCAr
board. "Many of us, however, are still a little skeptical. It's partly the
conditioning of past experiences."Y
It was this experience which led to the formation of theE
association last summer. For years the individual clubs had been1
carrying their cause to the administration without results. Band-I
lng together has unified their efforts. e
Part of j the problem is that club sports falls between chairs.
Though technicallyrunder the control of theIntramural department,
they participate in intercollegiate sports, but not on the varsity level.
With neither side willing to accept the responsibility, the club
sports were left to fend for themselves. According to Bob Gillpn, the
IM department has "dropped the ball."
Canham considers them a separate responsibility. "They're sup-
posed to be under IMs," he explains, "but it doesn't work out that
way. Instead, they come to me; the buck ends at my desk.
"Their particclar problems are not those of the usual IM athlete,"
he continues. "Granted there are more students involved in the
IM program-that's the state of the union-but nobody has to be
shut out. The clubs are expanding and they're important too because
they reach a different group of students altogether."
The major complaint of the club sports in past years has been
inadequate practice and game space.
The refurbishing and seeding of Wines Field over the summer
will greatly restrict the number of available fields for the next three
weeks until it is ready for play.
In the meantime, Canham is allowing the rugby and lacrosse
clubs to use those fields inside the wall at Ferry Field. Arrangements
are still being worked out for the two games the ruggers play before
the scheduled opening of Wines Field.
As Canham defines his duties, "I provide the facilities, IM does
the scheduling, and then I settle all the disputes." Last year, no one
was willing to iron out such scheduling conflicts; and that, more
than anything, pointed pp the unresolved position of the sports clubs.
But Canham is not neglecting IMs either. The Regents have
appropriated $150 million to improve the intramural facilities.
Some of that has already been spent on Wines Field (the $14,000
used to blacktop the one field did not come out of his money).
Even little things like reversing the direction of the baseball
diamonds on Wines have increased the number of available fields.
By placing the backstops in the corners rather than in the middle of
Wines Field, four diamonds can be provided.
Although outdoor facilities are the crucial problem now, Canham
is also thinking ahead to roofed structures. "Building fields don't
really solve the whole problem," Canham remarks, "because the
those fields are not usable.'
Already on the drawing boards is a $400,000 plan for a multi-
purpose building to include five tennis courts, easily be adapted to
majority of the school year is made up of the winter months when
volleyball, etc.
Canham feels the students on campus are increasingly inte-
rested in finding leisure timie activities. If he keeps up his present
pace, they'll soon have the necessary facilities.
-DIANA ROMANCHUK
TVH lRENTALS
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Johnson
By FRED LaBOUR there had be

hurt

in

ragged scrimmage

en some doubt about

*

*

*

The 1968 edition of the Michi- wnter e woul ply yesteruuy.
gan football team got its first He was removed from the field
taste of game-like action yester- on a stretcher. The precise nature
day afternoon in sweltering Mich- of his injury was riot immediately
gan Stadium. known.
The scrimmage, coming after Head coach Bump Elliott said
only nine days of practice, and after the scrimmage that he was
most of those without full equip- not exactly pleased about t he
ment, featured injuries to two team's performance.
prominent Wolverine players and "We were ragged; just off the
generally ragged play by the team edge of doing things right," El-
n general. liott said. "Frankly, I'm not to-
Senior halfback and team cap- __
tain Ron Johnson displayed his
familiar slashing running attack
and scored a touchdown on a nine y
yard sweep in the first quarter be-
fore being sent to the hospital for
treatment of',a compound dislo-
cation of his right thumb. John- sot
son suffered the injury when he
slammed into the wall surround-
ing the playing area after run- NIGHT EDITOR:
ning out of the end zone. ROBIN WRIGHT
Another casualty of the hard-
hitting scrimmage was Kirby
Sams, a promising sophomore
halfback from Corpus Christi. tally disappointed in the team's
Earlier in the week Sams suffer- performance, but we had hoped
ed a concussion in practice a n d they would have been sharper."
Elliott said that this first scrim-
mage had been scheduled early in
the season because "we wanted
the team to get the feeling of a
game situation, especially in the
stadium, as quickly as possible."
The oldest Michigan bugaboo ofe
all showed that it was still cap- t
able of giving the coaches head-I
aches. Field goals. Four field goals
were missed. Two were attempt-t
ed by Mike Hankwitz, two by Tim
Killian, and all were from around
., ' the 20 yard line.t
"This is an area which, we
have to and willimprove on,''
stated Elliott.
Elliott commented generally byt
saying that "the timing of the
tackling and the blocking was off,
making it look a little ragged.
Besides Johnson's TD, the team
scored two other times, once on
a 40 yard pass interception by
Tom Curtis, and once when David
Farabee crossed the line after tak-
ing a lateral from Hankwitz,
who had just snared a pass from
:; second team quarterback Don,
Moorhead.
Starting quarterback D e n nis
KRY A Brown scrambled and ran well,
KIRBY SAMS although his passing game seem-

Scholla-der breaks record
for 200-meter freestyle.

A

By The Associated Press
LONG BEACH, Calif. 0P) - Don
Schollander smashed his world
record for the 200-meter freestyle
Frida' with a time of 1 minute,
54.8 seconds in preliminaries of
the U.S. men's Olympic Swimming
Trials.
Schollander's mark was one of
three world records smashed in
the opening program of a five-
day meet at the Belmont Plaza
pool.
Other world marks on the first
program of the five-nigh' "meet
were broken by Mark 'Spitz of
Santa Clara, Calif., with 55.6 in
the 100-meter butterfly and Char-
les Hickox of Indiana University
with 4:39.0 in the 400-meter indi-
vidual medley.
"I'm very definitely stronger,"
said Schollander in comparing this
campaign with 1964. "I hope I'm
a little smarter and a better
swimmer all the way around. If
I'm not, there's something wrong."
Schollander will swim the 100-
meter freestyle tomorrow and also
probably will win spots on both
the 400 and 800-meter relay
teams, so he could have a chance
for another four gold medals in
the Olympics at Mexico City this
October.

DON SCHOLLANDER.

SECOND STRING QUARTERBACK Don Moorhead, a 197-pound
sophomore, throws a pass during spring practice last March.
Moorhead quarterbacked the Wolverines' "Gold" team yesterday
in a scrimmage termed "ragged" by Coach Bump Elliott.

ed off. He appeared to have
trouble finding his receivers.
Brown fumbled three times.
Cornerback George Hoey made
two brilliant kick returns of over
30 yards, carefully threading his
way through hordes of would-bek
tacklers.
"We made several good plays:
and then a bad one, "Elliott add-
ed. "We couldn't come up with
the key play of the series."
With the team's opening game
just three weeks away, it appears
sBillboard
Officials are needed for In-
tramural softball. A meeting
for interested persons will be
held Tuesday, Sept. 3, at 7 p.m.
at the IM building.

that the team will have a good
deal to accomplish to be ready.
"We'll start pointing for Cali-
fornia in about another week or
so," concluded Elliott.
Join The Daily
"Sports Staff

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STUDENT WIVES:

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN offers a wide
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These positions are in a variety of academic, re-
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Those interested in Full-time, permanent positions
contact Central Personnel, 1020 L.S.&A. Bldg.,
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COMMENTARY,
'68
LEROI JONES
and
The Black Arts Theater
September 8th 8:00 P.M.
MUHAMMED ALI
September 15th 8:00 P.M.
DR. TIMOTHY LEARY debates
DR. SIDNEY COHEN
October 6th 8:00 P.M.
BILL BAIRD
"The Fight for Birth Control"
October 13th 2:00 P.M.

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Continuing Through
SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1
2:00 P.M.-THE KING AND HIS COURT
Advance ticket prices are $1.25 for adults and $.75 for students and
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8:00 P.M.-HOOT!
Sing on the grass until your mind's content. Hootenany on Palmer
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Catch the sun's rays, live band for your listening and dancing enjoy-
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