100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 01, 1968 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1968-09-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, September 1, 1968

Page;; i gh H I HIA;4L un a , S p e m e 1 6

'11

TV RENTALS
FREE service
per month and delivery
Call
NEJAC TV RENTALS 662-5671
SERVING BIG 10 SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

sI1I_____ _______

1
I

Orioles whip

i

Tigers

Sports Beat S-orts Beat Sports Beat

I I

I

n

,. r . ..
°

......................................................................................

:6
3
I..

i,

You'll Like The Way
GREENE'S Do
Your Shirts

"x:4+-.x.

You'll like the way shirts are done at Greene's. They're sparkling
white, neatly pressed, and beautifully packaged.%
Greene's use carefully-controlled formulas for soil removal, give your
shirts a gentle bleaching, and then add a special brightener for a really
white shirt.
Starching is done to your preference-or more important, it's ornitted
if you like a soft shirt.
Each shirt is individually packaged in cellophane, and a non-crush
collar support keeps your shirt in perfect shape.

a-::ra
E
t
...... ti
G:
i
! fi is
{:"iiii
rf}
is f
;
:R
w r1{
rt
o
:j; M
HV }ti
'irit

By HOWARD KOHN
Associate Editorial Director
Special to The Daily
DETROIT-Baltimore's Orioles,
who have been fermenting witch-
craft since the all-star game, re-
duced their magic number to 33
Yesterday with a 5-1 win over
Detroit.
Detroit's magic number (com-
bination of Tiger wins and Oridle
losses needed to clinch the pen-
nant) remained at 21.
Center fielder Paul Blair timed
two of John Hiller's slow curves
for a triple and a homerun 'for 4
runs batted in. The skinny little
outfielder teed off on Hiller in the
second with a -high fly which
Mickey Stanley couldn't hang onto
at the 440 foot sign to drive in
Boog Powell. Powell had walked on
four pitches.
Hiller, who had control trouble
in alternate innings passed Powell
again in the' fourth afterFrank
Robinson had doubled up the left
field alley. Blair waited patiently
for a high breaking curve and
puAiped it in the upper deck.
The three run shot finished
Hiller, who was succeeded by Pat
Dobson, Daryl Patterson andDon
McMahon.
The Detroit trio of relievers
dueled on even terms with Dave
McNally for the rest of the game.
McNally gave tie Tigers one run
in the sixth and Patterson gave it
back to the Orioles in the seventh.
McNally became the winningest
pitcher on the Baltimore staff,
posting his eighteenth win against
eight losses. He is 10-0 since the
All-Star break, when he told his
manager, Earl Weaver, that he
felt he'd never lose another game
all year.
The Oriole ace prevailed against
the Tigers' mild insurrection in
the sixth. Al Kaline singled in
Dick McAuliffe who had tripled
for the Tigers only run. McAuliffe
struck out his other three times
up against McNally.
Kaline, still hobbled by a lame
leg, 'had 'two of Detroit's six hits.
One was a line shot into the left
field corner which Frank Robinson
held to a single. Detroit loaded,
the bases after his sixth inning hit
on walks to Willie Horton and
Jim Price, but shortstop Dave
Johnson backhanded Dick Tra-

I __

PAUL BLAIR, Baltimore center fielder, touches home plate after
hitting a fourth inning three run homer that slammed the door
on any Tiger hopes in yesterday's game. Blair drove in four runs,

in the 5-1 Oriole victory.
cewski's grounder up the middle
to force Price at second.
Detroit's patented last inning
heroics consisted only of two sin-
gles, a doubleplay, and a long fly
of rising expectations and falling
altitude which Mervin Retten-
mund squelched and ended the.
game.
Hitter-pitcher Earl Wiison, who
had two homeruns and seven rbi's
in his last three, games, pinch hit
in the fourth;jbut unceremoniously
struck out.
Dennis McLain goes against Jim
Hardin in today's series finale.

TWINS TOP CHISOX
MINNESOTA' () - Rich Rol-
lins and Bob Allison slammed
home runs Saturday, leading the
Minnesota Twins to a 4-3 victory
over the Chicago White Sox,
o* Whe S
FOY SMASHES SLAM
BOSTON (P) - Third baseman
Joe Foy smacked a fifth inning
grand slam homerun to lead the
Red Sox to a 6-4 triumph o v e r.
Washington.
The uprising provided Jim Lon-
borg an unexpected victory, even-
ing his record at 5-$

E

By DaiuI -heir

DAILY FREE PICKUP AND DELIVERY SERVICE,

igan
71
.ms

xSt. Lou
San Fra
xCincinn
Chicago
Atlanta
Pittsbur
Hsouston
xNew Yo:
xPhiladel
Los An

Major League Standings

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W' L Pct.
W L Pet.
is 85 51 .625
xncisco 73 62 .541
ati 71 61 .538,
71 67 .514
68 69 .496
gh 65 71 .478
64 73 .467
irk 63 75 .457
phia 61 73 .455
eles 58 77 .430

GB
GB
11
12
15
17V2
20
23
23
26 Y

ast side
3033 Packard
971-3620

west side
1940 W. Stadium
NO 2-2543

compus
1213 S. University
NO3-30l16

main plant
514 E. Liberty
NO 2-3231

Ypsilanti
40 E. Mich
HU 2-53

WE LCOME U
OPEN
MON. thru SAT.
8:30 to 5:30 P.M.
DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigen Theatre

Subscribe to The Michigan Daily

MONDAY'S GAMES
louston at Pittsburgh, 2
an Francisco at Chicago, 2
Atlanta at New York, 2
St. Lois at Cincinnati, night
Los Angeles at Philadelphia, 2, twi
night
TODAY'S GAMES
Cincinnati at Philadelphia
St. Louis at New York
Houston at Chicago
Atlanta at Pittsburgh
Los Angeles at San Francisco
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Houston 6, Chicago 2
Pittsburgh 8, Atlanta 0
San Francisco 5, Los Angeles 1
Cincinnati at Philadelphia, inc.
St. Louis at New York, inc.

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Detroit 85 51 .625
[Baltimore 79 57 .581 6
Boston 73 64 .533 12y,
xCleveland 73 66 .525 132
xOakland 68 68 .500 17.
xNew York 66'68 .493 18
Minnesota 66 71 .482 19y,
xCalifornia 61 76 A445 24%
Chicago 57 79 .419 28
Washington 53 81 .396 31
te game not included.
MONDAY'S GAMES
New York at Baltimore, 2
Chicago at Washington, 2
Detroit at Oakland, 2
Boston at Minnesota, twilight
Cleveland at California, night
TODAY'S GAMES
Oakland at California
Baltimore at Detroit
Chzicago at Minnesota
New York atCleveland
Washington at Boston
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 6, Washington 4
Baltimore 5, Detroit 1
Minnesota 4, Chicago 3 ..
New York at Cleveland, inc.
Oakland at California, Inc.

(There are more black athletes in America now then
there have ever been. Fifty per cent of the players in the
National Basketball Association are black. Twenty-five
per cent of the players in the National Football League
are black. Twenty-five per cent of the players in major
league baseball are black. Because of these facts and
because of the further fact that s p o r t s and sporting
events are a major source of interaction in our society,
many whites and blacks seem to feel they understand
each other better now. But, somehow, the two worlds sep-
arated by color don't really seem any closer together as a
result of their mutual experience on the football field or
the basketball court . .
Early on a cold Saturday afternoon in a crowded
stadium bowl, 50,000 throats sent out a roar to greet 22
warriors garbed in clean shiny jerseys and sharp point-
ed cleats. The warriors clash in fifteen-minute intervals
four separate times, shake hands and then go home.
The battle is fought by two 11-man squads - one
against the other. A quarterback calls the "signals" and
everybody plays to win "for the team."
The quarterback has blue eyes.
* * *
The lean cat under an.11;00 p.m. streetlight wears
bright green slacks and slick pointed shoes. He wears
his curly hair long and his shades black.
He's in his part of town, where it moves baby. Where
there's music, baby, and there's people. Where' every-
body's gonna have a good time.
There's plenty of grass going around, and tablets
and liquids. There's plenty of sound in the doorways and
in the windows, and the sound has plenty of soul. There's
plenty of talk, too - people talkin' about Daddy Rose,
that big tackle. Daddy pliyed himself one game out
there today, they're sayin'. He's big, man, he's so bad.
Daddy Rose comes from this part of town. He's al-
ways up on dexies.
* * *
On Sunday morning, the quarterback takes his time
in rolling out of bed. The sun is white and warm on his
blanket and his body aches from the game.
He picks up the morning paper to read the scores
and curses a picture of a big ugly tackle making a key
The sun is still white and warm, so he rolls back ov-
er to sleep. There's no reason to get up today. Sunday is
a day of worship and'of rest.
To hell with worship; Sunday is a day of rest.
* * *
The shakes are bad in the morning. And the cat is
getting fed up with the stink. It's getting to be time to
break out of this stink ... to get out of there and make
those green dollars like Daddy Rose. To get rid of this
scene.
Today's Sunday. That wouldn't be a bad day, but
tomorrow's Monday. We'll just wait until Monday.
Maybe then the shakes will be gone. And maybe
then there'll be some action. There's always people on a
Monday, baby, there's always plenty of people. And ev-
erybody's gonna have a good time.
*. ' *
Monday afternoon scrimmages are always the worst.
All those aches and pains from the game have to be
worked out. It sure is nice to be a quarterback, though;
the coaches take good care of you. Wouldn't want to be
those two fast: halfbacks, trying 'to beat each' other at
time trials for the one starting spot still open.
Wouldn't want to be one of those five negroes stack-
ed at cornerback. They're sweating hard at every prac-
tice so two of them can play on Saturday.
Oh well. Another game this week. A lot more cheers to
look forward to, and some more pretty girls. Saturday's
not so long off.
Monday's really dead this time, man, but Mondays
are always dead. Those shakes might be comin' back
again, but you can't really tell.
Wish there were a few more dollars here right now.
Just might have to spend 'Saturday night pushing. That
would be a shame. Saturday "nights are for fun, baby,1
Saturday nights are for FUN. I11
But that's okay. Saturday night is a long way off.
(For some white men, football is a reality. For some
black men, football is a reality. For some men, black and
white, football is not a reality. However it is for any one
man, the realities for black and white are never the
same ..)

FOREIGN STUDENT PICNIC
MONDAY, September 2nd-2:00 P.M.-6:00 P.M.
GAMES, FOOD, FRIENDS
All Free!!
PPLACE: Island Park, Ann Arbor
Transportation provided fron iInternational Center
2:00 P.tA.
Sponsored by Ecumenical Center
ALL FOREIGN STUDENTS WELCOME

01

.::>.'..'''..'........'.'

;;

_.

' t ' :4~$$"'
..'l
'i:",.
t( ..
:':......................<:.............. >:: ..' - .? ...,::-v::. -::pv,........:.'Yds i2;y}."v.:; . ':::}s ;r:~":
...*5.', x .:::: S."}ti:". .. t.vvv:" : "rt:v: '
S .... x . r.i:i'v.t, {.} i}"' ti4 .
~~'"{
,. .. < ~~~~~~~. . . . . .. .. -: .:.:: ,:. t "" 4t ^:rti;L"^r:"#:%.':\y;,"" yi}'
.v,., {Cb <;t,; :}x i:sj:::}:''.."-::..:r.s ":
f- . : :t , :.__r4___ v.' _: _ _ _v_ 3 r __::tr;_ ":"£{;:.+:
HARAN-ARDN{FM. ECEVE
5ARADUHAGE.WthBae ndDimodtarrig
I.A.YTMFO PRMNSORSNL OM...:......::yf.-.
A-ese MK. Ai, Sspesio Spak r Drr~

Put Your CarOn A Dirt-Free Diet
j You know it's clean because you do it yourself

I

Wash, Rinse and Wax! .WAy1N rO
5 Minutes - 25c [iCWl J4.4
- -- Uinc

.an..

M~

LIBERTY .A 3
CARWASH in
x 4
318 W. Liberty St. OPEN 24 HOURS
I U
", Y'..?::?::,t:;..t rYS.:': . .x.. ... . . . : '.. : ":kk'' . :i:.,." . f
::: ? ,. "k~:.>.... :::.:-:: >.a.:: .._. .....:..............:....:::i...:.... . ..a .;; . ................:a ,i "s >te .:f'}: -.....
MCHMEINGAN MENOK
s.
OVER OUR FALL
COLLECTION AT

WANTED: COMPUTER PROGRAMMERS
OPPORTUNITY OF THE SEMESTER!?
* .Are you interested in computers?
Do you want to learn a totally new concept
in computer terminals?;
* Are you experienced in machine or asseibler
language programming?
If you can answer all of these questions with-YES-
then SYSTRONICS, INC. is the right place for you.

Ai

Back to Top

© 2019 Regents of the University of Michigan