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April 17, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-17

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pag4e three

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TWO MORE CLASSICS STARRING
W. C. FIELDS
MATINEES ONLY
"The Old Fashioned Way"
1:30 and 3:45
"Tille and Gus"
2:45 and 5:00
PFP'TH PoI'UM
.t U y IFTH AVENUE AT LBERTY
f DOWNTOWN ANN ARROW
INFORMATION 761-9700

-didL Ldd6- &
tr4tpan

&tti

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Friday, April 17, 1970 . Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I

the
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

not continuous with "All the Loving Couples"
SAVE THIS AD
Thurs., Fri.-April 16, 17
LES GIRLS
dir. GEORGE CUKOR (1939)
A comic Rashomon recitation by dancing girls,
Gene Kelly, Mitzi Gaynor, Kay Kendall.
Sat., Syn.-April 18, 19
YOU ONLY LIVE ONCE
dir. FRITZ LANG (1937)
Henry Fonda and Sylvia Sydney in Lang's ver-
sion of the Bonnie and Clyde story.
SHORT: Peoples Park
EXAM WEEK MOVIES
Thurs., Fri.,-April 23, 24
A- DAY AT THE RACES
dir. SAM WOOD (1937)
The hilarious anarchy of the Marx Brothers.
Sat., Sun.-April 25, 26
HORSE FEATHERS
dir. NORMAN McLEOD (1932)
More of the Marx Brothers' insanity.
SHORT: His X Marks the Spot--
Buster Keaton

THE U.S. AND USSR opened negotiations in their strategic
arms limitation talks in Vienna yesterday.
President Nixon said in a message to the formal opening cere-
mony that he hoped the two great powers could first agree to curb
their nuclear missile arms race and then reduce their arsenal of
these weapons.
There appeared to be an uneasiness on both sides as a result of
the build-ups in nuclear weapons by both countries since the Helsinki
preliminary talks last year.
A WELFARE REFORM BILL providing for a guaranteed
minimum family income passed the House yesterday and now
moves to the Senate.
The reform bill, strongly endorsed by President Nixon, would
give every family $500 annual income for the first two members of
the family and $300 a year for each additional child.
A family of four would thus receive at least $1600 per year.
Single persons and childless couples would not receive benefits under
the proposed legislation.
Under the proposed program, welfare payments would not be cut
for the first $60 a month of earned family income. Above that level,
reduction would be fifty cents for each dollar earned.
The program would also increase benefits to aged, blind and
disabled adults.
Voting for the bill were 140 Democrats and 103 Republicans.
Against it were 84 Democrats and 71 Republicans.
TWENTY-THREE AMERICAN defectorsfromrmilitary serv-
ice have been granted asylum in Sweden since March 2.
In announcing the latest statistics, the Swedish Immigration
and Naturalization Board also reported that 409 Americans have
been given asylum for "humanitarian reasons" since 1967 when the
influx of defectors and protesters against the Vietnam war began.
Stockholm police said that of the 409 who have been admitted
to Sweden, 52 have been apprehended on narcotic drug charges and
some of them will be expelled after serving their sentences.
PROTESTANT EXTREMIST the Rev. Ian Paisley was elected
to the Northern Ireland Parliament yesterday.
Paisley defeated Bolton Minford of the ruling Unionist party
and Laborite John McHugh.e
The result was a setback for Northern Ireland's prime ministery
James Chichester-Clarke, who is trying to reconcile Catholic-Protes-t
tant antagonisms in a country where Protestants outnumber Catho-
lics 2-1.L
Paisley-a towering anti-Catholic-is now seeking to stop a civil
rights movement that would remove discriminations against the
Catholic minority.I
THE JUSTICE DEPARTMENT said yesterday that Supreme f
Court nominee Harry A. Blackmun sat as a federal judge in three _
cases involving firms in which he held stock.
The information was contained in a letter from Deputy Atty.
Gen. Richard Kleindienst to Chairman James 0. Eastland (D-Miss.)
of the Senate Judiciary Committee.
The Justice Department said, however, that Blackmun's hold-
ings were insignificant, and in one case he voted against the Ford
Motor Co. in which he held $2,500 worth of stock.

-Associated Press
Horsing around
Students from a Stonington, Connecticut, hig h school demonstrate against pollution by using
non-automotive transportation. Similar activities are planned for a nationwide observance of Earth
Day next Wednesday.
JOHN COLLINS:
Caufornia grand jury Udicts
accused slayer l"ofEM coed,

Postal
reforms
unveiled
Nixon asks
pay hike,'
8-cent letter
WASHINGTON ( -- Presi-
dent Nixon yesterday unveiled
a compromise plan to reform
the postal system, give more
pay to mail handlers, and
avoid a 10-cent letter charge.
Nixon pared down his r at e
request to eight cents, a two-cent
increase over the present rate.
The proposal, largely worked
out by federal and union nego-
tiators, were designed to improve
chances of congressional and
public approval.
AFL-CIO President G e o r g e
Meany, appearing before news-
men at the White House, was one
of the first to support the plan,
declaring, "This is one of the
most significant events in the his-
tory of collective bargaining."
As part of a compromise, Nix-
on not only revised postal rate
increases he proposed just tw o
weeks ago but also abandoned his
1969 plan to turn the Post Of-
fice Department into an indepen-
dent corporation.
His present plan; is to create
a United States Postal Service
that would be insulated from
political pressures and patronage
while remaining a part of the
executive branch.
Other principal features of the
program are:
-Postal workers would get an
eight per cent pay increase, over
and above the six per cent gov-
ernment increase Nixon signed
into law Wednesday, and would
reach top pay scales in eight
years instead of the current 21
years.
-The postal workers would
bargain collectively with the pro-
posed postal service over wages,
hours and working conditions
generally, with negotiating im-
passes being finally resolved, if
necessary, by binding arbitration.
-Postal rates would be in-
creased, but by considerably less
in the aggregate than Nixon had
recommended on April 3.
-The Post Office Department
would no longer be a Cabinet-level
agency and the 'postmaster gen=
eral would be hired by a bipartisan
commission with his tenure "bas-
ed on performance and not on
politics."
-The commissioners would
have broad authority to fix pos-
tal rates and pay scales but eith-
er house of Congress could veto
proposed rate changes by a two-
thirds vote.
Postmaster General Winton M.
Blount said he is confident the
Nixon-endorsed reforms w o ul d
avert wildcat strikes of the sort
that crippled mail services in a
number of major cities last month.

John Collins, the accused slay-
er of an Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity coed, was indicted by a
California grand jury Wednesday
in connection with a murder there
last summer.
Collins, a former EMU student,
was charge'd by a grand jury in
Salinas, Calif. with the murder of
Roxie Ann Phillips, a 17-year old
native of Milwaukee, Oregon.
Miss Phillips had been visiting
friends in Salinas last July when

she accepted a date from a young
man who reportedly g a v e his
name as "John Collins' and said
he was a college student from
Michigan. Two weeks later her
dead body was found in a rubbish.
dump 17 miles west of Salinas.
Collins and a friend, Andrew
Manuel, had driven a car with a
rented trailer to the Salinas area
in late June last year.
Collins and Manuel abandoned
the trailer in California, and Man-

Course Mart classes
for fall announced

7 & 9:05
662-8871

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uel was subsequently convicted for
larceny by conversion 1 a s t De-
cember. Hewasiconvicted in
Washtenaw County Circuit Court
last December and given f i v e
.Year, probation
Collins is presently awaiting
trial, scheduled f o r June 1, in
Circuit Court for the murder of
Karen Sue Beineman, a 19-year-
old EMU coed who was strangled
and dumped in an A n n Arbor
Township ditch last July.
Meanwhile, Collins' lawyers have
filed a change of venue motion.
In that motion, lawyer Neil Fink
said that Collins' case has been
the subject of massive radio and
television coverage which, he
claims has produced a strong
community feeling against the de-
fendant.
No trial proceedings can begin
against Collins in the California
case until the case here is finished.
The procedure will be for t h e
Monterey County Superior Court
judge to ask Washtenaw County
Prosecutor William Delhey to
place a "hold" on Collins until
the proceedings here are done.
The California authorities will
then seek extradition.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the tUniversity of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor.
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day thrcugh Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. $3.00 by
mal.

By STEPHANIE RAPORTE
Course Mart, which enables
students to innovate their own
courses for credit, yesterday an-
nounced its course selections for
the fall term.
Nine new courses were approved
by the LSA curriculum committee
yesterday. They are: "The Mili-
tary in Modern America," "Legal
Rights and Police Practices,"
Physical and Quantitative Analy-
sis of Social and Environmental
Phenomena," "Introduction to En-
vironmental Studies," "Counter-
culture," "Organizational Leader-
ship," "The Philosophy of Science
Fiction," "Introduction to Photo-
graphic Expression and Commun-
ication." and "Planned Change."
To propose a new course, a stu-
dent must find a faculty sponsor
interested in teaching the course

or willing to work with a "quali-
fied" graduate student who would
teach it.
The student and, sponsor then
submit, the proposed syllabus to a
committee of three faculty, three
students, and an administrator. If
the course is approved by this
committee, the proposal goes be-
fore the curriculum committee,
oP' the college for final approval.
Students can elect Course Mart
courses Pass Fail but cannot
count them toward concentration
requirements.
Registration for Course M a r t
courses takes place only during
registration in Waterman Gym in
September. No student may sign
up before this time, and courses
are filled on a first-come first-
served basis.

Wen

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Phone 662-2576
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now give free rides to work, campus and home

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