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April 16, 1970 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-16

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Thursday, April 16, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Dmi Nin

T h u r d a y , A p ri 1 6 , 1 9 7 T H E M I C H G A N A I L

rage wine

a,

art-
A potpourri of expression

By JOEL ISAACSON
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The author
is an assistant professor in the
history of art ueparcient.)
So many art exhibitions,
particularly student shows, are
mounted in Ann Arbor and then
. so quickly disappear that they
seem to have been reserved for
the artists' themselves and for
a few friends. By the time we
become aware of them or get
around to it. it is too late.
So consider this an invitation
--to a very short-lived affair.
First-year Masters stud nts
from Architecture and Design
are exhibiting their work in
the Assembly Hall of the Mich-
igan Union today through Sa-
turday. Hours are Thursday and
Friday, 10 a.m. - 7 p.m., Sa-
turday, 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. The
Assembly Hall can be difficult
to find, but if you go to the
basement of the Union and
head south you will locate it.
The show offers a wide range
of formal expressions-at first
it seems a potpourri of discor-
* dant statements - and yet
very few of the major modes
of recent years are represent-
ed: there is no color field paint-
ing, minimal or kinetic sculp-
ture, earthworks or environ-
DAILY OFFICIAL
BiL ETIN

mental proposals, no op or
straight pop. Pop is there all
right but partly digested by an
appetite for abstraction or soc-
ial criticism. It is with the
latter emphasis that students
have appropriated pop art and
popular imagery since its first
significant appearance about
ten years ago. In this vein,
several of the artists comment
upon Vietnam, violence, and the
American condition (the three
by now all but synonymous).
Vietnam is violence, violence
is Vietnam, Vietnam is Amer-
ica - this seems to be the
message reiterated in Rita Mes-
sanger's semi-abstract, techni-
cally explorative silk screen
and mixed comments upon our
recent history. Vietnam is also
the scene of John Harkobusic's
photographs. Vietnamese peo-
ple and villages and scenes of
war are printed by means of
old photographic techniques
which give to them the air
of the faded family album -
there is a touchingly strained
image of a young boy - or
yield a subtly varied yet high-
contrast abstraction, as in his
solarized prints. A sense of
violence, to body and spirit,
also seems to be basic to the
heraldic plaques of David R.
MacDonald, offering images

which metamorphose from
flags to shields to helmets and
gasmasks to plastic wombs
from which spill forth the gen-
erations still to come. T h e
conditions of creation, growth,
and aspiration are the themes
of Sister Barbara Cervenka's
watercolors and multi-part oil
paintings of abstract and de-
formed images. The human
body, maimed or incomplete, is
suggested also in W ill i a m
Moore's sculpturally powerful
image of wood and m o 1 d e d
plastic.
Along with bitter social crit-
icism - and yet not always far
removed from it - we find hu-
mor and fantasy in generous
proportions. Ralph Moore's or-
gone-box-like Man I and his
molded plastic relief of frogs
offer bizarre references to the
human condition. Donna Webb's
ceramic, wood, and plastic sculp-
tures of useless curiosities-soft
vaguely sexual, unfunctional
tools, beautifully chrome-glazed
wedges of clay, and soft, plas-
tic ropes emerging from a black
box - offer striking examples
of the surreal, fantasy-gener-
ated imagery which, in one way
or another, pervades the whole
show.
Other works should be men-
tioned as well: Susan Crow-
30 hrs. wk., asst. in research I, Eng.
journ., lib. arts degree BA nec. with
writing, organization abilities, some
famil. w/nat. sci., med., or physics
terminology.
Protest and Community Services:
Hamtramck, Mich., project director for
fed. govt. contracted neighborhood
youth corp, work w/ 16 b.s. drop-
outs. indiv. and group couns., ad-
min. and supv. of 1 other employee,
community relations wk., BA/,MA Soc.
Sci., Soc. Wk., Educ., Soc., Psych., etc.
0-3 years exper considered.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB, Lower Level
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Texas Instruments, Attleboro, Mass.,
(Continued on Page 12)

Fellowships
awarded
The John Simon Guggenheim
Memorial Foundation has award-
ed fellowships to four University
professors. The committee of Se-
lection chose 286 scholars, scien-
tists, and artists from among 2,313
applicants in the Foundation's for-
ty-sixth annual competition. Fel-'
lowship awards totalled $2,605,000.
Named as felllows from the Uni-!
versity are Dr. Clyde H. Coombs,
Professor of Psychology, for Theo-1
retical studies in mathematical
psychology; Dr. David H. Krantz,
Associate Professor of Psychology,
for Theoretical studies in psy-
chophysiqs and perception; Dr.
Robert Sklar, Associate Professor
of History, for cultural history of
the American movies; Dr. Robert
H. Super, Professor of English, for
the completion of an edition of
Matthew Arnold's prose works.

TO ALL STUDENTS:
With examination time near and at the
end of another school year, we would
like to wish you well and thank you for
your business this past year. Good Luck!

-Slater' s

Bookstore

-

-Daily-Dave Schindel
'Wall plaque' by David MacDon aid

ell's ceramic ice-cream-cone-
stud-farm-black-tie-and-pearl-
necklace-party, S. C. McBroom,
Jr's corrugated tubular, snak-
ingkceramic forms, Rhona
Marks' gaudy and gauzy wall
hangings, which she calls soft
drawings. Ellen Wilt's strange
menagerie of caged rocks and
her delicately pounced image of
roses on a soft, bleeding water-
color ground, I. B. Remsen's
red and black ceramic balls

with rope. Paul Murphy has
combined geometric and in-
formal abstraction with photo-
graphy-derived images in a
series of paintings and prints,
Peggy Toole has a masterful
large woodcut of a densely
wooded landscape mounted as
a hanging scroll, and Chester
Williams offers two paintings
and a welded metal sculpture
in somewhat conventionally
abstract modes.

Dr.
mai
Apr.
Rms.
2148.

FOREIGN VISITORS
B. Kamthong, Rector, Chieng-
U., Thailand, can be reached,
16-17, thru For. Visitor Div.,
22-24, Mich. Union, phone 764-

tion, phone 764-9270.
THURSDAY, APRIL 16
Day Calend((1r
Physics Lunch Seminar: Len Sand-
'er, "The Theory of aPraelectric Re-
sonance", P&A Colloq. /Rm., 12 p.m.I
Library Sci. Lect.: J. Shera, C a s e
W. Reserve, Multipurpose Room, Un-
dergrad. Lib., 2 p.m.
Natural Resources Program: Dr.
Normondy, Director, Comm. on Un-I
dergrad. Ed. in Biological Sciences,
Wash.. D.C., "Program and Curri-
cula Needs in Environment Sciences",
1040 Nat. Resources, 3:30 p.m.
MHRI Seminar: D. Reiss, M.D., Nat.
Inst. of Mental Health, "A Computer
Automated Procedure for Testing a
Theory of Cansensual Experience in
Families", 1057 MHRI, 3:45 p.m.
Student Lab Theater: "The OldA
Wives:Tale,"aArena Theater, Frieze
Bldg., 4:10 p.m.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society: "Pi-
rates of Penzance", Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 8:00 p.m.
Univ. Symphony Orchestra: Josef
Blatt, conductor; featuring winners of
,ijndergrad. Performance Competition,
Hill. 8 p.m.
Science & Tech. Lect.: H. E. Wright,
Jr. U. of Minnesota, "Climatic Change
and the Original of Agriculture in
the Near East, 3082 Nat. Sci., 8 p.m.
General Notices
Grade Sheets for Winter, 1970 have
been sent to depts. for distribution to
instructors. Any grade sheets for de-
gree students should be submitted
48 hours after the exam and no later
to the Office of Registrar within
than 12:00 noon, Fri., May 1. Failure
to do so may prevent graduation for
certain students. All grade sheets for
non-degree students submitted with-
4n five days of exam, and-, no later
than Sat., May 2, 12:00 noon. Grade
messenger service will be provided
on a regular basis by Office of the
Registrar .to departmental offices on
Central Campus, April 23, 12:00 noon
May 4. Grades may also be submittedI
directly to Office of the Registrar atI
'Window A" LS&A Bldg., during
working hours. Questions, call 764-
62^2.

ANNOUNCEMENT:
Management Intern Orals will be,
given, Ann Arbor, Apr, 30 or May
1. if eligiblebut have not received
notice from wash, by next week, call
Miss Webber, 764-7460.
Placement Service
Current Openings in S. E. Mich.
area, others nationwide, come and
browse:j
Local Medical Org. 3/4 time, 25-

-i
The Ha fWGV nn
East Quad's Coffeehouse & Snackbar
Inexpensive Luncheons, Dinners, Snacks
CONTINUOUSLY OPEN STAGE-
ALL WELCOME TO PERFORM
or Just Come In and Jam
HOURS: Mon.-Thurs.-1 1:00 A.M.-2 A.M.
Fri.-1 1:00 A.M.-3 A.M.
Sat.-7:30 P.M.-3 A.M.
Sun.-3:00 P.M.-] 2 A.M.
Informal Atmosphere, Good Food

Miss J steps up to the platform sole
open back, Etcetera .,.
snubby closed toe, broad shaped
heel and great going for your
new wardrobe of hemline
lengths. Navy or red calfskin with
white platform sole
sling back and instep strap.

! SKI MT. ALTA,
MT. HOOD, MT. BAKER,
GARIBALDI'S, WHISTLER
MTN., & MT. WASH INGTON !
AFTER FINALS
ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING
MONDAY, APRIL 20
Room 3X Union
7:30 P.M.

I

Jacob~onys JA4p

o+w .

why cart all those
.
i clothes home?
9 Call Greene's Cleaners today!
We'll deliver a storage box-
Fill it with your winter garments
We'll pick it up-clean your garments-
Mothproof them and
Store them in our air conditioned vault.
Next fall-give us a call. We'll deliver-
fresh and clean-beautifully pressed.
* It's so convenient-and cheaper
than shipping. Still only $4.95 plus
regular cleaning charges. Call and
reserve your box today. 662-3231
G Lreene's Cleaners
ANN ARBOR'S ONLY REFRIGERATED VAULT

May Festival Ushers: A
positions still open for
Fest., if interested, call]
er, 668-8597.

few usher
1970 May'
Mr. Warn-j

Recommendations for Departmental
Honors: Teaching depts. wishing to
rec. tentative aMy grads from Coll.
of LS&A for honors or high honorsC
should do so by forwarding a letter
AngellHall,
to Director, Honors Council, 1210 An-
gell Hall, before noon, Fri. Apr. 24.
Teaching depts. in Sch. of Ed. should
forward letters directly to Office
of Registration and Records, Rm. 1513
LS&A Bldg., by noon Fri., Apr. 24.

F

Summer Jobs for Students
Applications are now being accepted for summer i o b s with a major corporation.
Students 18 years of age and over wanted to learn marketing, sales promotion and
brand identification techniques. From now through the end of summer. High level
executive management training courses given to qualified applicants. Salary $115
per week, for first 3 weeks, $145 per week plus bonuses starting 4th week.

SCHOLARSHIPS
WIN ONE OF 15 $1,000 SCH-
OLARSHIPS ALONE. M A N Y
MAKE $3,000 AND MORE.

It
HIGH PAY
E A R N at Least $1,500 for
Summer Pay.
VACATIONS
Win an all-expense paid holi-
day for an entire week.

TRAVEL
Work anywhere in U.S. or
Canada. Qualified students may

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