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April 14, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-14

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WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY
April 15th and 16th
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
PRESENTS
THE OLD WIVES' TALE
by GEORGE PEELE
Arena Theatre, Frieze Building promptly at 4:10 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

E

Y t

F,
yam

pag~e three

_

-I

NOW SFO VILLBGE
SH OWI NG375 No. MAPLE RD.-769-13OO

TIMES
Mon.-Fri.
7:10-9:30

'M*A*S' is what Sat.-Sun
the new freedom :00-3 00
of the screen 9:30
is all about."
-Richard Schickel, Life
An Ingo Preminger Production
Color by DE LUXE@
Panavision '

THE VIET CONG carried their 13-day offensive into Saigon
last night, rocketing the city for the first time in nearly four
months.
The U.S. Command said four Vietnamese were killed and 37
wounded when four 100-pound rockets hit in downtown Saigon within
blocks of the official residence of President Ngoyen Van Thieu. One
rocket hit a block and a half from the U.S. Embassy.
The heaviest casualties occurred in a theater where one missile
ripped through the roof during a live performance.
MIKIS THEODORAKIS, Greek composer, arrived in Paris
last night after nearly three years of Greek imprisonment.
Theodorakis, ill with tuberculosis, received an emotional welcome
from 200 Greek exiles, as he arrived from Athens aboard a plane
chartered by Jean-Jaques Servan Schreiber, cofounder of a French
weekly magazine, express and secretary-general of the left-center
Radical party.
Theodorakis was arrested on Aug. 21, 1967, following the estab-
lishment of the Patriotic Front political party and has been kept in
various Greek prisons ever since. Theodorakis composed" the musical
scores for the films "Z" and "Zorba the Greek."
* * * -
SPORADIC OUTBREAKS of violence yesterday marked the
continuation yesterday of a wildcat strike by truckdrivers in the
Detroit area.
The violence came about after approximately 200 members of
the Teamsters Local 299 said they would ignore Teamsters Union
officials' orders to return to work, and pledged to keep picketing atf
local cartage company terminals.
Most of the 6,000 members of the local agreed to go back to work
Sunday.
Meanwhile in Chicago, about 32,000 drivers struck an estimated
130 firms that failed to reach agreements with either the Teamsters
Union or the independent Chicago Truck Drivers Union. In retaliation,
five Chicago, trucking associations locked out another 35,000 drivers
and dockmen.

Apollo crew en
prepare craft for
lunar orbiut 'entry
H 0 U S T 0 N {M - Two Apollo 13 astronauts opened a
command ship hatch last night in order to enter their moon
landing craft and check a remote possibility that helium pres-
sure in one of its tanks had built too high.
They also planned a warm up of the craft, preparing for
Apollo 13's entry, into lunar orbit tonight.
Mission Control scheduled the inspection of the lunar
module, Aquarius, three hours early. Then Apollo 13 com-
mander James A. Lovell Jr. moved it up another hour because
he said, "We're getting bored."
Lovell and Fred W. Haise Jr. were directed by ground
engineers to activate the craft's electrical system and to

Tuesday, April 14, 1970

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

wm

ammmm

"LEAVES -BOB & CAROL & TED & ALICE'
AT THE STARTING GATE!" -Bob Salmaggi, WINS

I

RELEASED BY U.M FILM DISTRIBUTORS INC.
COLOR By MOVIELAS
"IN THIS ONE YOU GET
AN ORGY THAT'S AN
ORGY!"
-Judith Crist
0 0 iFTH POr'UM
FIFTH AVENUE AT LIBERTY
DOWNTOWN ANN ARBOR
INFORMATION 761-9700

-Associated Press
A Fonda fast for peace

A FOUR-ALARM FIRE in New York City Sunday damaged Actress Jane Fonda begins a 36-houri
the offices of the lawyers representing the Black Panthers and anti-war activities in Denver. Miss Fon
other people facing criminal prosecution. Denver time yesterday in United Nati4
Gerald Lefcourt, attorney for several of 13 Black Panthers there until midnight tonight.
charged with bomb conspiracy, said his firm's fourth-floor law offices --- ----__-_-
suffered heat and water damages. ;CALLOW RETREA ':
Lef court said all the material for the Panthers defense was in the A RE TREA T :
offices. hut an accurate assessment of the damage had not been com-

fast yesterday as part of
da began her fast at noon
ons Square and will stay

6:45-8:10-9:35

pleted.

6th
WEEK

dmm

DIAL
8-6416

Issues
{Continued fr

dtsorc
om Page 1)

ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
BEST FOREIGN
FILM

"'Z' damn
near knocks
you out of
your seat."
The New
Yorker

arose during'the strike, there wasE
never disagreement on the point
of increased educational oppor-
tunities for black students at this
University," Fleming said. How-
ever, he added that the difference
between the 7 per cent black en-
rollment level by 1973-74 which
the University advocated and the
10 per cent enrollment level de-
sired by BAM "became the prin-
cipal bone of contention" in the
strike.
He said, when the resolutions
from the various colleges to give
financial aid for black admissions
were presented, the reaction from
the outside community was "that
obviously there was surplus money
in the University's budget" to give
black admissions such a high pri-
ority.
"The most heartening aspect to
come out of the strike was the
capacity, here in this diverse Uni-
versity and between divided com-
munities, to come together suffi-
ciently behind this goal so that we
could find a solution to it," Flem-
ing said.

i

ances will reappear once more .in
the same manner or in a different!
crisis.
Fleming continued, saying that
the University should not adopt
the practice of never calling in
the police when violence occurs'
but that "the only real solution to
the problem is not police or Na-
tional Guard action, but is a fac-
ing up to the problems which we
recognize."
The strike, class disruptions and
property destruction could possibly
affect the portion of the Univer-
sity's budget which is appropriated
by the Legislature, Fleming said.
He said that the University's.
budget for the coming year is

er -warning
"There are people in the Uni-
versity and outside of it who feel
that the only way to handle this
disruption is through the use of
police. Perhaps this is right, but
the lesson is that this is not an
answer to the problem," Fleming
said. He explained that in the uni-
versities that have called in police
to quell disturbances, the police
actions may maintain the peace
for a short time but the griev-

Ag ewssurrender' to'-,RAM
(Continued from Page 1) "The University would not have
Ed Fabre, a BAM spokesman, made a commitment to 10 per cent
said Agnew's comments were "in- if it thought it would water down
dicative of a sick mentality." thequality of its degree," he
"Agnew is so concerned about added.
unqualified students coming in," Speaking of Agnew's reference
said Fabre. "I'm more concerned to "the surrender in Ann Arbor,"
about what kind of student comes Regent William Cudlip R-Grosse
out." Pointe Shores) said, "We don't
- surrender to anybody at Ann
Arbor."
"Stripped of -all its fineries,"
Cudlip said the final statement of
I the Regents was essentially the
same as their original plan of
March 19, "supplemented by what
the deans did."
(Continued from Page 1) Regent Robert Nederlander (D-
would have given students parity Birmingham) said, "We'd been
on any board determining juris- working on the program for a long
diction in such cases. Brand with- time. The University is a quality
drew the motion, he said, when school. We're going to continue
he realized there was "no chance" with quality education."
that it would pass.IRegent Gertrude Huebner (R-
The agreement on disciplinary Bloomfield Hills) said the speech
reprisals for strike-connected ac- by Agnew was "a little extreme."
tivity reached by BAM and Pre- Agnew implied, she said, that "the
sident Robben Fleming provid- University would go downhill in
es that students charged with a hurry and that's not true."
such offenses have the option of Mrs. Huebner defended Flem-
being tried by an "outside im- ing's handling of the situation.
partial hearing officer" to be ap- "It takes more guts to negotiate
pointed by the president or bythan to call in the National
inted by thepreidntorv y Guard," she said.

check on the pressure level in -
a super-cold helium tank.
They started in as the space-
craft was more than 200,000 miles
from earth, having completed
about two-thirds of the voyage to
the moon.
Earlier yesterday Mission Con-
trol engineers ordered astronauts
to check a remote possibility that
helium pressure had built too high
in the moon landing craft.
As astronauts Lovell and Haise
were to crawl inside the moon
lander, Aquarius, anyway for a
general inspection, .they were di-
rected to activate the craft's elec-
trical system and to check on the
pressure level in a super-cold
helium tank.
Haise and Lovell had already
planned to enter the moon lander
to check out systems. The pressure
check was added only as a precau-
tion, officials said, yesterday.
Mission Control ordered the test
as a precaution against any un-
planned pressure build up. Helium.
pressure, which is used to force
propellant into the descent rocket
engine of the moon lander, rose
unexpectedly before Apollo 13 was
launched. The problem was fixed,
but engineers want to make cer-
tain the tank is still all right.
Apollo 13 was so accurately on
its path to the moon yesterday,
that officials cancelled a course
correction. Lovell and Haise used
the time saved to move into Aqua-
rius three hours earlier than plan-
ned.
The astronauts reported early
yesterday that they had been jar-
red awake Sunday night by the
shriek of a master alarm in the
spacecraft.
"It really scared us," said Lovell..
"We were all over the cockpit."
The problem was only minor,
however, and the spacemen went
back to sleep. Space officials said
the alarm was caused when tem-
perature in a hydrogen tank in
the electrical system dipped too
low. A heater came on automatic-
ally and solved the problem, they
said.
"Sorry it wasn't anything more
significant," kidded capsule com-
municator Kerwin.

"'

i seeks
oilbusing
BRADENTON, Fla. W) - Gov.
Claude Kirk took his pupil busing
fight to court yesterday while
Manatee County school officials
prepared for the federal integra-
tion plan Kirk blocked for more
than a week.
Kirk filed two briefs with the
U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals
in New Orleans and said "We are
on our way to victory for all the
school children of this nation."
As Kirk flew to New Orleans, his
attorney went before. U.S. District
Judge Ben Krentzman in Tampa
and promised that the governor
and his aides would no longer in-
terfere with the Manatee County
school system.
On April 5, Kirk announced he
would# take over the Manatee
school system in order to thwart
Judge Krentzman's integration or-
der - which calls for busing 2,600
of Manatee's 17,000 public school
pupils, and transferring 107 teach-
ers.
On Sunday, Kirk said he would
withdraw from the school system
because he wanted to work through
the courts and the Justice Depart-
ment has assured him it would
seek modification of the busing
plan. But a Justice Department
spokesman said the department
would not seek to modify the plan,
but only to have it studied further.
Judge Krentzman, who Satur-
day levied a $10,000-a-day con-
tempt fine on Kirk if he continied
to run the school system this
week, accepted the compliance or-
der. His acceptance apparently
cleared Kirk of the contempt ci-
tation.
The two "friend of the court"
briefs filed Monday by Kirk in
conjunction with Manatee Coun-
ty's appeal would block the Mana-
tee desegregation plan. They con-
tend busing on the basis of race
violates due process and equal
protection.
Meanwhile, M a n a t e e School
Supt. Jack Davidson - twice sus-
pended by Kirk last week - said
the desegregation plan would be
implemented Tuesday. Krentz-
man's original order called for im-
plementation last Monday.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

"THE LAST WORD IN THRILLERS,
TERRIFICY"
-GENE SHALIT, Look Magazine

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Fleming noted that the public based on a proposed tax increase
is taking a hostile view toward the
class disruptions on campus and and if this increase is not passed,
that this hostility is carried over then the University's appropria-
into the Legislature. tion may be cut.
TFM, After Much Delay, Wishes To
Make Public His Intentions Con-
cerning and Desire for TJM's Hand
(and other parts) in Un ion. Will
You?

the "normal disciplinary chan-
nels" within the various schools
and colleges.
Yesterday's motion also includes'
a provision stating that the board
"may choose to hold a preliminary
hearing to decide whether to con-
sider a case in a full hearing.",
The purpose of the hearing would1
be to determine whether er not a,
case was properly presented to
the board in accordance with legal
specifications and not to deter-
mine if the board has jurisdiction
Board members asserted yester-
day that pending a proposed re-'
vision of the regental bylaws, the'
board legally has jurisdiction over
cases invQlving class disruptions.1
{ E
DIAL 5-6290
"FOUR STARS * ** *HIGHEST
RATING ... A GRATIFYING
ACHIEVEMENT."
-Wanda Hale, N.Y. Daily News
"EPIC BATTLE OF THE SEXES."
-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times

Candidate withdraws

(Continued from Page 1)
cial aids and admissions under
the control of the OSS was indi-
cative of this.
Shervington also criticized the
administration for it's delay in
selecting a new vice president.
"When we met in January, it
was my impression that a decision
would be reached in ten days," he
wrote, referring to his interview
with Fleming immediately after
the s e a r c h committee made its
recommendations.
"Except for one brief letter, I
have had no communication from
Program Info: NO 2-6264
LAST 2 BIG DAYS!
SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:00-9:10 P.M.

any member of the administration
about the Vice Presidency or any
related matter for approximately
four months. It appears by that
neglect that the position is not as
executive as claimed. Certainly
the administration is extremely
busy, but it is difficult to under-
stand the apparently low priority
'for such an executive office."
Fleming accepted the with-
drawal during the meeting Sunday
Shervington said, and made no
attempt to persuade Shervington
to reconsider or postpone his de-
cision.
Fleming has said he is waiting
for resolution of a dispute over
the Regents' bylaws which would
create the OSS before making the
appointment.

'r

o

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Follett's pays you
more cash for
your used books
You'll have to go far to find anyone who'll beat a
Follett's book-buying bonanza. Others may have
the best intentions, but it's simple mathematics
- you can get more for your used texts from an
organization which can afford to make less per
book. That's us. We are part of a growing chain
of stores who deal in volume, so sometimes we're
almost just trading dollars. But, don't feel sorry
for us; our loss is your gain.
Right after your exams, cleanse yourself of your
past. Bring in all those used textbooks and walk
out-with dollar bills. More than you'll get elsewhere.
Come early for the crisp ones. We might suggest
that you spend them here next year, if you're
still around, and save yourself a few more dollars.
Just to keep a good thing going.

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