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January 16, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-16

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"ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST !"
-NEAL GABLER, Michigan Daily
co I s ynmie

Nixon plans to defer only med students

'Dazzling...
Devastating..;
Brilliant! Must be
seen by anyone
who cares about
"the development
of modern movies!"
-Newsweek
"Staggerin g!..
lluminating...
Magnificent! It
is the stuffaf now!
Young people...
should be required
to see 'Medium Coo'!"
-Holiday
"Stunning! One of
the best pictures .
of 1969!"-Cosmopolitan

As impassioned and
impressive a film as
any released so far
this year! Signals'
perhaps a new bold-
ness in American
cinema! Extraordinary!"
-Time

WASHINGTON (IP) - Only medical
students will be eligible for college defer-
ments under the Nixon administration
proposals to eliminate draft inequities.
After a specified date, no other student
entering college can claim deferment on
the basis of education.
However, a sophomore, junior or senior
with an existing draft deferment when
the new rules go into effect will be per-
mitted to complete his undergraduate
schooling.
This is the thinking of Pentagon of-
ficials who have been shaping the ad-
page
three'

ministration's proposals to do away with
draft deferments in the student, occu-
pational, and parental categories.
Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird
said last weekend President Nixon "wants
to move in the direction so that all young
people are treated equally and fairly."
Proposed measures to carry out this ob-
ject will be reviewed by the National
Security Council and laid before the Sen-
ate Armed " Services Committee next
month with indications the administra-
tion will put them into effect as soon as
possible.

Just when this will be is still uncertain,.
Pentagon officials said they understood
action by Congress would be needed to
change the college deferment provisions,
but other proposed changes could be
made by executive order.
Officials said young men having occu-
pational and parental deferments at the
time the more stringent rules take hold
will be allowed to retain them.
But, as in the case of student defer-
ments, no new ones will be granted.
Unlike the student deferment, which
officials say will permit exceptions for

pre-medical students, there appears to be
no prospect of any further deferments for
job or family reasons, except where hard-
ship might be involved.
Job deferments have been heavy in the
field of teaching, police, and fire depart-
ment work.
Authorities expect community needs
can be filled adequately by former serv-
icemen and no special deferments will be
required in these areas.
The same reasoning applies to hard
skill jobs in the mechanical and technical
fields they said.

"Powerful IThe first
entirely serious,
commercially spon-
sored, basically
Fictional film to
be born out of the
time of political
and social troubles
Paramount v., ...through which this
Pictures nation has been
presents d coo' passing!"-Life
prodced by writte and dircted by
tully Friedman & has<ell wexier/haskell wexler
techrncobr paramount picture
1 .St 'Ii7 9

,I 'P

irl 'tg tn

ttii

NEWS PHONE:
764-0552

Friday, January 16, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

FRI i9-TH -T. 579
FR1.7, 9, 11-SAT. 5, 7, 9, 1

the
news 11 '' toda
by The Associated Pr ess anzd Colleg e Press Service

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X persons under 18 not admitted

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SECRETARY OF DEFENSE MELVIN LAIRD said yesterday
that total U.S. military strength will be cut by about 300,000 men
by next June.
Laird announced the manpower reduction, heavier than previously
indicated, at a meeting of the California State Chamber of Commerce.
REPUBLICAN LEADERS in both the Senate and House ap-
pealed for a united GOP vote to sustain a veto by President Nix-
on of the $9.7 billion health and education bill.
Hopes to head off the expected veto appear dim. A delegation of
education and medical leaders visited the White House yesterday to
argue against a veto, but a spokesman for the group said later that
they were assured Nixon would stand firm in, his determination to
veto the appropriations bill, which covers the Labor and Health, Ed-
ucation and Welfare Departments.
* *
SENATE INVESTIGATORS were told the government con-
tinues to approve birth control pills containing estrogen, which
was banned ten years ago because it caused caincer in animals.
Dr. Roy Hertz, a noted birth control specialist discussed the hor-
mones hazards with the investigators.
The hormone was being used as a chicken fattener when it was
discovered to cause cancer In laboratory animals. The hormone was
earlier abandoned in Britain after it was connected to fatal blood
clotting.
MAJ. GEN. PHILIP EFFIONG surrendered Biafra formally
and unconditionally to the Nigerians yesterday.
Effiong also pledged to support a united, undivided Nigeria.
At the same time Gen. C. Odumegwu Ojukwu, the Biafran leader
who fled the country last Sunday, charged that federal government
was bent on a genocide in Biafra that would make World War II
in Europe look like "child's play." Ojukwu appealed for the inter-
vention of neutralist forces to prevent any possible slaughter.
* * *
A TOP AIDE and a friend of House Speaker John W. McCor-
mack both pleaded innocent yesterday to a federal-indictment
charging them with using the speaker's capital office as a base
for peddling influence.
Martin Sweig, McCormack's aide, and lobbyist Nathan Voloshen
were freed on personal recognizance and restricted to the continental
United States.
* * *
THE NIXON ADMINISTRATION has reached an agreement
banning the construction of a major jetport near the Everglades
National Park.
Secretary of the Interior Walter J. Hickel and Secretary of Trans-
portation John A. Volpe announced the agreement with the state of
Florida at a news conference yesterday.
VICE PRESIDENT AGNEW encountered the largest anti-
American demonstration of his Asian tour in Auckland, New
Zealand.
Police pushed back some 500 demonstrators in front of Agnew's
downtown hotel. The Vice President evaded the protesters by entering
the hotel via the exit driveway at the opposite end of the block.
A man was arrested who allegedly telephoned two assassination
threats against Agnew at his hotel. Police said they used over 200
men, one third of Auckland's force, to contain the demonstration.
* * *
THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ap-
proved a nationwide "partnership" venture intended to launch
nearly $2 billion worth of new, privately built lower income hous-
Sing.
Authorized by Congress under the 1968 housing act and backed by
a board of big name industrialists, the newly created National Cor-
poration for Housing Partnerships expects to win cooperation from
local investors and builders in every major city.

'-Associated Press
Genocide charge
Former Biafran leader Gen. C. Odumegwu Ojukwu yesterday
charged Nigeria with attempts to carry out genocide in Biafra,
and he appealed for a neutral force to prevent it.
NATIONAL TRIBUTE:
emoral Sertces
commemorate King

to meet
By JAMES McFERSON
A board of one student, one
faculty member and a represent-
tive of the administration will co-
ordinate presentations from the
University community at the re-
cently instituted open Regent's
meeting.
The composition of the "agenda
board" was determined yesterday
at the montrly ad-hoc meeting
of the Senate Advisory Committee
on University Affairs (SACUA)
and students representing the
various schools and colleges of the
University.
The SACUA-student group was
originally formed to direct stu-
dent-faculty action on the book-
store proposals.. However, the
group is now discussing other pos-
sible joint proposals.
The "agenda board" was form-
ed to co-ordinate presentations by
individuals or groups whowish to
discuss a problem with the y Re-
gents and to arrange a workable
schedule of such presentations for
the open meetings.
According to Student Govern-
ment Council President Marty
McLaughlin the agenda board will
be operated in the following 'way:
-The board will send out let-
ters at the beginning of each
semester to organized groups, gov-
ernments of schools and colleges,
and other groups informing them
of the services offered by the
agenda board;
-Problems which these groups
send to the board will enable a
prospective agenda to be'drawn up
to place before the Regents; and
-Approximately ten days before
the Regents meeting, the agenda
board will let the groups know
what the Regents intend to dis-
cuss and will also advertise the
open meetings in The Daily.
Sam B. Warner, professor of his-
tory, has won the Albert J. Beve-
ridge Award by the American His-
torical Association.
The $5,000 prize for "the best
book on American liistory during,
1968-69" was awarded in recogni-
tion of Prof. Warner's 'The Pri-
vate City: Philadelphia in T h r e e
Periods of Its Growth," published
by the University of Pennsylvania
Press.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged .by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues.
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $l0 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. S'ubscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

..- ...

". _ ..:... I . 3 1r
f raw *** -. - ..

Hi-Fi Headquarters in Ann Arbor

for ZS Years
304 S. Thayer
Across from Hill Auditori'
ce
.

665-8607

uum

By The Associated Press
Memorial services commemorat-
ing Martin Luther King Jr. were
held throughout the country yes-
terday, his birthday.
In Atlanta, Ga. nearly 1,000
persons filled the Ebenezer Bap-
tist church where the late Dr.
King had often preached. The ob-
servances marked the inauguara-
tion of a memorial center which
is designed as a cultural and spirit-
ual center for black people every-
where.
When completed, the memorial
center will occupy two locations-
the Auburn Avenue area where
King was born, and which includes
his church, and a site near the
Atlanta University community
where King did his undergraduate
work at Morehouse College.
In New York, Gov. Nelson
Rockefeller and Mayor John Lind-
say spoke to about 1,Q00 persons
at memorial services at Canaan
Baptist church in Harlem.
In St. Paul, Minn., former Vice
President Hubert H. Humphrey
urged Americans to remember Dr.
King by summoning the "courage
for reconciliation" and rejecting
the "cowardice of violence." j

Sen. Edward W. Brooke (R-
Mass), the only black in the U.S.
Senate, spoke during a memorial
service in the Massachusetts House
Chamber in Boston.
"It is not easy for a man to see
the goals for which he has sacri-
ficed all discredited by a new and
militant philosophy which pro-
claims its adherence to the same
ends, but deliberately chooses
means which insure that the goals
will never be reached," Brooke
said.
In West Virginia, Gov. Arch A.
Moore and Secretary/ of State
John D. Rockefeller IV, attended
a brief memorial service in the
rotunda of the state capitol, while
the House and Senate observed a
moment of silence.
At a service in Charleston, W.
Va., the Rev. Hilarion Cann said
if man is to carry out King's
policy of nonviolence, "he must
purge his heart of all kinds of
violence."
Predominantly black s c h o ol1s
closed in Seattle, while in Los An-
geles, evening church services
were to include prayer, singing
and talks about King's work.

e

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