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April 05, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-05

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday Argil 13- 1970

{. eToTH IHGA AL

.JulnI1u Yt A"P, I R 1 7 rv

1

dance
Imagination pervades concert

f _

By C. Q. SPINGLER
If dance is to be considered
a serious and valuable art form
at the University, then funds,
space, and faculty must be made
available for the creation of a
Department of Dance inde-
pendent of the Physical Edu-
cation P r o g r a m. The .dance
program deserves to have a
certain administrative' a n d
budgeting autonomy as well as
more :efficient ways of work-
ing with the other creative arts
programs within the Univer-
sity. A concert which bears the
fruits of the concerted efforts
of the music, art, theatre and
dance departments should be
the rule at the University, not
the exception.
For, dance is not a sub-branch
of physical education; it is a
complex form of aesthetic ex-
pression by which many ele-
miental areas of human exper-
ience are perceptively realized
and represented. It often re-
lies.on music and even sculpture
and painting to enhance it's
statements, but it's primary rhy-
thms and harmonies are those
of the body and the body is the
instrument used to create it's
perceptual images. There is no
doubt of the importance on
dance's contribution to the ex-
p a n s io.n of consciousness
through an aesthetic experience.
Yet, every year the University
dance program is hampered by
lack of funds, lack of technical
staff, and lack of time on the
part of the dancers who must
necessarily put academic effort
before artistic endeavor. And
every year there is an exodus

of the most talented student
choreographers and dancers to
other universities where a full-
time program of rigorous train-
ing in dance and choreography
is available.
In spite of this, the dancers
here manage to produce a good
concert. This year's program
had much to recommend it; a
vitality on the part of the par-
ticipants in dances that were
topical and imaginative, en-
handed by participation of peo-
ple from outside the dance de-
partment who offered their
technical and artistic talents
greatly helping the visual and
audial aspects of the show.
Among the many pieces, two
chereographed by Vera Em-
bree were worthy 'of note.
"Songs of Today Part II" was
a strong direct expression of
some aspects of the complex
consciousness of today's black
American. The piece is t h e
second part of the trilogy of
dances composed by Mrs. Em-
bree (The first part was seen
at last year's concert) and I
hope that some day we will have
the opportunity to see the en-
tire trilogy presented at a con-
cert.
Mrs. Embree's second piece
"Kin and Ken" concluded t h e
concert with impressive exu-
berance. This free version of a
traditional African dance was
an eloquent demonstration of
the vitality of the meeting be-

tween modern and traditional
dance forms.
It was refreshing to see a
concert of dances in which the,
theme of "the struggle for self
expression" so tempting and so
fatal to young choreographers
was totally absent. Humor and
Love, Anger and Commitment
seem to have replaced inner
writings.
In the humorous vein, "Get
There: Capsule Treatment" was
most successful. Performed by
a large group of non-dancers, it
was a parody on the daily rat
race and consisted of distorted
bodies racing and purring to
arrive somewhere. Visual rather
than kinetic humour was pro-
vided by the costumes of Pat
Olesko in "Faux Pas de Deux
for Three." The monsterous
Olesko breasts with red nipples
hung pendulously from an
enormous ,ballerina, while
a peculiar caterpillar lounged
on some green grass provided
by a patchwork tramp. The hu-
mour of the choreographer lag-;
ged somewhat behind the ef-
fect of the costumes. However
much of the antics were height-
ened by Dana Reitz who danc-
ed (played? mimed?) the tramp
qnd whose comic facial expres-
sions could have happily found
a place within a Fellini film.
There were two numbers on
the program which revealed
considerable choreographic abi-
lity. These were "Passage"
choreographed by Dana Reitz

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and "Window in the Afternoon"
choreographed by Carol Rich-
ard. Both treated the reaching
out of human beings to one ano-
ther. The first was an abstract
on this theme and the second a
humourous scenario of frus-

trated versus overt sexuality. In
both, form and idea were con-
sistently juxtaposed, resulting
hension on the part of the aud-
in involvement and comprehen-
sion on the part of the aud-
ience.

i''

nS

DIAL 5-6290
NOMNATED FOR 10
ACADEMY AWARDS
"FOUR STARS*** *HIGHEST
RATING... A GRATIFYING
ACHIEVEMENT."
-Wanda Hale, N.Y. Daily News
"EPIC BATTLE OF THE SEXES."
-Vincent Canby, N.Y. times

ml

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* Take Opinion Polls " Raise Campaign Funds
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CHILDREN'S PRICE AT ALL SHOWS

" Dazzling!
A vivid
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thrilling! A
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in space!"
-L.A.Times

m a G:,:t~s.: D .

HELD OVER FOR A 5TH WEEK
"The last
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Nearly 30 percent of the Ann Arbor population is University of Michigan students who have
virtually no say in the selection of candidates, the election of these candidates and conse-
quently very little voice in the affairs of City Governmenf.

I

44

MONDAY-TUESDAY-2:15-4:30-6:55-9:30
* STARTS WEDNESDAY
20th Century Fox presents An
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Production
MR CoCrbyDELUXE'
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"'Z' damn near
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-Pauline Kael, The
New Yorker

u "Enough intrigue

-Gene Shalit, Look Magazine

and excitement to
eclipse James Bond."
--PLAYBOY

I

I

I

I

The,

I

As the present Ward boundaries in Ann Arbor are now laid out, portions of four words pro-
ject into the central campus and hospital areas. The representatives from these four wards
represent a very small segment of the student voting population and must remain primarily
responsible to the non-student voting population in their respective word. The issues and
problems of hese two voting segments are frequently different and often times divergent. If
a word election appears to be a close one, each candidate will seek a little additional insur-
ance thru solicitation of the student voters in his ward. Due to the differences in issues and
his position on issues, he finds himself talking out of both sides of his mouth which usually
results in a credibility gap with both votng segments. If you have participdted in local elec-
tions before, I am sure you are aware of the various candidate's superficial appeals to the
student voter. I am sure you are also aware that once the promises have been made and the
candidate elected, these promises become illusionary, at least until the next election.
An example of this approach being used in this year's election is the Democratic candidate's
concern for student problems, specifically thru his introduction of a City Ordinance to permit
the City Clerk to act as an escrow agent for damage deposits for apartments. While taking
credit for the introduction of this legislation, he fails to point out that this is strictly a volun-
tary arrangement that must be agreed to by both landlord and tenant. It will be interesting
to see, if this legislation is passed, exactly how damage deposits will end up being held by the
City Clerk's office. As is often the case, what is important is not what you are told but, what
you are not told.
After every census, the City of Ann Arbor is required by State law to re-district their ward
boundaries based on population. In Ann Arbor, this re-districting will take-place during 1971
and 1972 and the political party in power will be responsible for determining boundaries for
the words. It would seem prudent and sensible to me that when this re-districting is done
that they should eliminate those parts of the words that extend into the central campus and
hospital area where the majority of the students are presently living and form a separate
ward for these areas. This would then make it possible for the students to chose, support and
elect one of their own to serve on the City Council of Ann Arbor. It would also allow the:
other candidates to be more forthright and honest with their constituents. It would further
permit an effective student voice on City Council which I feel would benefit not just the
students but the rest of the citizens of Ann Arbor as well,
In the City of Madison, Witconsin, they have a similar ward set-up and the students elected
two representatives to serve on the City Council. I recently talked with the assistant to the
Mayor in Madison with regard to their system and he advised me that it works effectively
and provides the students with an active voice in City Government.

tf
i

UNIVERSITY OF
MICHIGAN

' Js
Ring Day
APRIL 6

*

4'

- - >., , I.

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Ii U THIS PROPOSAL PFOR THEICRElATION OfF A STUDENPT VOlTING WARDl ISflONEPI FIRMLY',

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