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April 04, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-04

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page three

im4r

ALICE'S RESTAURANT
presents
MARGERY HIMEL

Sfr~tii an

4b,
.Batty

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, April 4, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

9 P.M.
Alice

soc

VALUABLE REFERENDUM?
Housing vote reactions vary

Lloyd Hall

CLEVELAND
WILL INTERVIEW MON DAY
AT HILLEL-1429 HILL

(Continued from Page 1)
agrees, but views such a shift-
transferring money from one Uni-
versity department to another-as
selfish and arbitrary.
The other reason administrators
doubt the validity of the referen-
dum is, its lack of representative-
ness. In the past the administra-
tion has said it will iiot be bound
by SGC referenda, for which only
a minority of students generally
vote.
Vice President- for Academic
Affairs Allan Smith expressed this
sentiment last year in reference
to Council's referendum on stu-
dent control of funding new con-
struction facilities. And just this
week the Regents barred a com-
pulsory $3 fee assessment to add
money to the Martin Luther King
Scholarship Fund. The assessment
was approved by students in the
same election which presented the
low-cost housing questions.
Scott acknowledges the small
turnout, but says that enough
s t u d e n t s expressed concern to
warrant the construction of hous-
ing on students' behalf. "In an

election where not many people:
voted, here is an issue which de- ,
cisively won," he says.
He also claims that the per-
centage which did vote is probably,
larger than the fraction of the
vote the Regents receive in their
election.
Despite apparent reluctance on
the part of administrators to
honor the referendum, however,
the students believe it served a!
useful purpose by legitimizing stu-
dent concern on the issue. This
was accomplished, they say, by
placing of the housing issue on
the election ballot of SGC - the
students' institutional representa-
tive.
"Now we can say we tried the+
channels," one student said
And some students maintain the
channels may be closed. The ad-
ministration does not believe the
University can finance the hous-
ing's construction - but students
do. The gray area involves a value
judgment - priorities - over
which students and administrators
have historically disagreed. To
many students, the issue is similar

FOR INFORMATION AND APPOINTMENT
CALL 769-7288

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to the Black Action Movement
demands, for which the University
ultimately found the money when
it was pushed.
Will the University, in fact, be
pushed again? Denton says IS has!
adopted the low-cost housing drive
as its main issue for fall and con-
tends that militant tactics may
be used. Scott and Council member
Joan Martin say that SGC may
need to pursue "more creative
means" to accomplish their goal.
What' those means will be,
whether the goal can be reached
and whether the issue will be con-
sidered institutionally are all un-
clear now. And until these ques-
tions are clarified and some un-
derstanding is reached between
students and the administration,
those referendum results may re-
main stacked in the SGC office
for some time to come.
Court fails to
test war law
(Continued from Page 1)
decision has been made about
O'Brien's offer.
Quinn said he will submit a brief
and complaint to the U.S. Su-
preme Court as soon as possible,
but doesn't expect the court to
hear the case until the October
term.
Quinn said the suit would be
filed as a class action, one or more
soldiers would be named but it
would apply to all- Massachusetts
servicemen.
Some staff members of Quinn's
office said the Supreme Court
might, rule the state law uncon-
stitutional because it raises polit-
ical rather than legal questions.
Sen. Abraham Ribicoff (D-
Conn), questioned the law at a
news conference here Friday by
saying, "It would be unfortunate
to think that every state could
make its own determination on
national policy."

Nixon
asks new
postage
(Continued from Page 1)
pedited collection of estate and
gift taxes which he said would
produce a one-shot revenue wind-
fall of $1.5 billion in the 1971 fis-
cal year.
When addeddto sums already
budgeted for federal pay increases,
the President said, Thursday's
settlement can be paid for through
mid-1971 through adoption of his
proposals. But he emphasized that
other permanent revenue legisla-
tion would be needed thereafter.
The Senate Post Office Com-
mittee will take up Nixon's request
for postal-rate boosts Monday but
there is considerable question
about how far and how fast Con-
gress will move on this pocket-
book issue in an election year.
One congressional source noted
that the first-class rate never has
been increased more than a cent at
a time.
Another question that remains
to be answered is whether the
postal workers will accept the pro-
posed package. Already it has
brought some rumblings from big-
city employes who have been in-
sisting on differentials to cover
high living costs in'their areas.
And there is some skepticism
among postal union members over
when they might get the second,
8 per cent increase.
Nixon was rather optimistic
about acceptance of his proposal,
however. "Had this action been
taken earlier, the postal work
stoppage would have been avert-
ed," he said.
John D. Ehrlichman, a presi-
dential counsel, hinted that postal
pay increases would hinge on
favorable action on higher postal
rates. But he would not say that
Nixon would veto legislation if
Congress refused to act simul-
taneously on the question of rates.

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

I

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PETULA
Starring JULIE CHRISTIE, GEORGE C. SCOTT
Directed by RICHARD LESTER
Aud A, Angell Hall 7 and 9:30 P.M.
April 3 aid 4, Friday and Saturday-15c
-AND-
SUNDAY, April 5-7 and 9:30 P.M.
ROBIN HOOD
Starring ERROL FLYNN
SAT. & SUN.-April 4 & 5
Ir
AlxanMder Nevsk
Dir. SERGEI EISENSTEIN (1938)
Operatic and mythic monument to the Rus-
sian people and their historic heroes. Award-
ed the Order of Lenin in 1939 with Nikolai
Cherkassov. Music by Prokiev.
7 & 9:05 7 CARCHITECTURE
662-8871 AUDITORIUM

Sociology Colloquium
Prof essor Richard Cloward
Columbia University School of Social Work

"WELFARE AND WORK: THE,
ORIGINS OF THE WELFARE CRISIS"
4:00 P.M.-Tuesday, April 1,1910
ROOM 231 ANGELL HALL

BRITAIN'S ARMY CHIEF in Northern Ireland says his men
will shoot to kill if attacked by people throwing gasoline bombs.
The warning came after three straight nights of rioting in Bel-
fast's Springfield Road area, the dividing line between Roman Catholic
and Protestants housing developments.
A good deal of the recent violence, during which three soldiers
were injured by gasoline bombs, rocks, bottles and other hurled
missiles, has been blamed on teenage hooligans.
A bomb exploded early this morning against the front df a fur-
niture store on a Protestant street, but little damage and no casualties
were reported.
An army spokesman said that the army chief's speech "seems to
be paying off. We've got a lot of troops out ... The idea is to stifle
it before it starts."
REPUBLICAN LEADERS in the Senate claim a sure 49 votes
against a move to send back to committee the Supreme Court
nomination of G. Harrold Carswell.
If the nomination of the 50-year-old Florida judge survives
recommittal the Senate will vote Wednesday on confirmation.
That would be more than enough to block the motion because four
of the 100 senators are not expected to be present for the first key
vote.
Meanwhile yesterday, Senators opposing the nomination demand-
ed that the Justice Department explain why it did not produce
"significant and easily discovered information bearing on the nomi-
nee's fitness."
In a letter to Attorney General John Mitchell, four senators said
that in the past the FBI. has been under instructions to investigate
a federal judicial nominee's racial attitudes with particular care.
Yet in the case of Carswell, they said, disclosure of a 1948 white
supremacy speech and the Florida judge's participation in incorporat-
ing a segregated golf club were revealed by private citizens.
TRUCKING STRIKES ended in some cities yesterday, but
continued in others and spread to new areas.
Despite a three-year tentative national agreement to hike wages
$1.10 per hour, new strikes broke out in Miami and Tampa Florida.
Walkouts of thousands of men continued for the third day in
St. Louis, Cleveland and St. Paul despite a national Teamsters Union
request to go back, to work pending a vote on the proposed contract.
Meanwhile, in an attempt to end the air controllers' rebellion, top
officials of the Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization
scheduled a news conference to order the controllers back publicly
in compliance with a court-directed agreement with the government.
For the first time since the sick-call campaign began Wednesday
of last week, the Airline Transport Association reported fewer flight
cancellations and shorter delays.
The Federal Aviation Administration reported no significant
back-to-work trend.
"We see a slight over-all improvement, but not enough to have
much effect," a spokesman said.
Absenteeism continued high at key facilities in New York, .Chi-
cago, Kansas City and Minneapolis-St. Paul.
THE AFL-CIO International Association of Machinists and
strikebound National Airlines yesterday agreed on -a three,-year
contract.
The contract will raise pay of some 1,000 mechanics a reported
$1.10 per hour but the agreement will not get National's planes back
in the air until it settles with the striking Air Line Employes Asso-
ciation representing clerks and ticket agents.
CHANCELLOR WILLY BRANDT leaves for the United States
today for talks with President Nixon.
In addition to talks concerning the European Common Market,
Brandt said the issue of future American troop levels in Europe would
be discussed.
The Chancellor warned against "dramatizing" voices in the
American Congress that are calling for reduction of the 310,000-man
U.S. troop level in Europe if Bonn and other European governments
do not come up with more money.

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Womnhit Pentagon
for discrimination

, .

DO YOU RIDE
A MOTORCYCLE?

WASHINGTON
women's rights
reached into the

(WP -
movement
Pentagon.

T h e women's talents to the fullest, and
has says:

PARK FREE WHILE

SHOPPING AT

fig

SAM'S STORE

Two women leaders - one in
Air Force blue - are out with
public statements deploring their
sex's second class status in the
service.
Col. Jeanne M. Holm, director
of Women in the Air Force, says:
"To date, top-level management
and executive positions are, for all
practical purposes, closed to mili-
tary women except those directly
involved with Women's programs."
Dr. Hester Turner, chairman of
the Defense Advisory Committee
on Women in the Services, sug-
gests the military, fails to use
NGC THEATRE CORPORATION
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"It is doubtful that a military
system which does not itself pro-
vide equality of opportunity for its
own members can truly ensure.;.
freedom for its country's citizens."
These statements by Col. Holm
and Dr. Turner appeared, some-
. what surprisingly, in the Defense
Management Journal, a Pentagon
publication devoted to discussing
ways to stimulate cost reduction
and efficiency.
There are more than 40,000
womenrserving in the Army, Navy,
Marines and Air Force, doing
mainly clerical work, medical ad-
ministration, and certain technical
assignments..
Various commissions and other
agencies in the past have called
for improving opportunities for
women in the military, thus re-
ducing the number of men called
in the draft.
Postpone cleaning
The "spring cleaning" scheduled
today for the Huron River has
been postponed until May 16. At
that time, students and any Ann
Arbor citizens concerned about
the environment will gather at
North Campus Commons to leave
for the various cleanup areas.
The "cleaning" is being coor-
dinated by the Environmental Ac-
tion Committee (ENACT).

122 E. WASHINGTON

Carnival on Diag
APRIL 6-10
12 Noon-4 P.M.
* FOOD-CONCESSIONS
* CONCESSIONS

-Free

Daily Official Bulletin
SATURDAY, APRIL 4
Day Calendar
American Academy of Arts and Sci
ences Conference: "Learning, Teaching
and Evaluation": W. Qonf. Rm., Rack-
ham, 9:00 a.m.
Degree Recital: Walden Bass, cello;
Sch. of Music Recital Hall, 12:30 p.m.
Baseball: U-M .vs. Detroit (double-
header): Ferry Field, 1:00 p.m.
Degree Recital: Martin Tittle, piano,
School of Music Recital Hall, 2:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Elizabeth Williams,
violin, Sch, of Music Recital Hall, 4:30
p.m.
Degree Recital: John Shafer, trom-
bone, School of Music Recital Hall, 8:00
p.m.
Placement Service
Further Info. at Career Planning, 3200
SAB, 764-6338.

SPACE IS AVAILABLE FOR MOTOR-
CYCLES ONLY AT THE PARKING
STRUCTURE ACROSS FROM THE
STORE. HAVE YOUR TICKET VAL.I-
DATED!

*
*
*

LIVE ENTERTAINMENT
12 Noon
SPECIAL GIVEAWAYS
ASSORTED SPECTACULARS

Claremont Colleges Graduate School,
Calif.: "Program to Develop Teacher-
Leaders Specializing in Problems of the
Disadvantaged."
Personnel Services of National Jew-
ist Welfare Board, listing of job open-
ings and other personnel and training
info.
tSUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB, Lower Level
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
Library Futures, N.Y. cadet program
for NYC and environs.
Union Carbide, Tonawonda, N.Y., gen.
& mechan. engrs. completed Jr. Yr.,
(M and F).
Elmhurst, Ill., summer forestry prog.,
good salary.
NASA, Greenfeit, Md., completed
soph. yr. in soc. sci., research and de-
velopment jobs in ad., apply before
Apr. 30.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription, rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily
We Want-You. To Join Our Church
As-An
Ordained Minister
And Have The Rank Of
Doctor of Divinity
We are a non-structured faith, un-
Idemonational with no traditional
doctrine or dogma. Our fast growing
church is actively seeking new min-
isters whorbelieve what we believe;
All. men are entitled to their own
convictions; To seek truth their. own
way, whatever it may be, no ques-
tions asked. As a minister of the
church, you may:
1. Start your own church and ap-
pyfor exemption from property

"

(Paid Political Advertisement)
YOU HAVE A GOOD CITY COUNCILMAN/KEEP HIM

HAVE YOUR LUNCH ON THE DIAG
Carnival Yost Field House-50c
Fri., Apr. 10-7 P.M.-12
Sat., Apr. 11-12 Noon-5:30 P.M.; 7 P.M.-12
Sunday, April 12, 12 Noon -6 P.M.

PETITIONING OPEN FOR

AS COUNCILMAN, LEN QUENON HAS:
--steered through Housing Code revisions making
Ann Arbor a notional leader in the field;
-introduced the niaximum possible air pollution
control ordinance for the States of Michigan;
-worked to maximize inter-governmental cooper-
ation and minmize overlap, waste, and conflict;
-introduced damage deposit legislation to insure
fair settlements between landlords and tenant;
-and much, much more.
F 0 R CONTINUED EFFECTIVE REPRE-
SENTATION OF YOUR INTERESTS ...

LS

&A

* Amusement Rides
* Game Booths

STUDENT
JUDICIARY

* Contests-Pizza Eating

RE-ELECT ERNEST L.

Informntinn and

11111

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