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April 04, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-04

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SAturdcy, April 4, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Saturday, April 4, 1970

Oldies: A recorded unity

Into another world

By RICHARD KETELHUT
Like a snake that gets hold
of its own tail, swallows itself
up, and disappears, the consum-
mate completeness of Crosby,
Stills a n d Nash as a musical
creation is in many ways para-
doxical.
David Crosby, Stephen Stills,
and Graham Nash owe their as-
sociation to their former mem-
bership in, respectively, the
Byrds, the Buffalo Springfield,
and the Hollies. Yet instead of
being merely a distillation of
these groups the music sounds
totally fresh and original. The
instrumental virtuosity display-
ed complements perfectly the
inventive vocal harmonies and
phrasing.
The three distinctively indi-
vidual personalities of t h e
group's members merge c o m-
pletely to form the single uni-
fied entity of Crosby, Stills, and
Nash. Nevertheless, the indiv-
iduality of e a c h musician is
freely displayed as part of the
group's collective identity.
"She turns her gaze down the
slope to the harbor where I lay
anchored for the day . ."
"Guinevere" expresses beauty
in such a way that the song it-
self becomes the musical and
lyrical personification of beau-
ty. "She shall be free . . ." The
song draws the listener into its
own frame of reference, its own
world.
Each of the album's ten
songs stands on its own as a
coherent, purposeful piece of
music. Yet it is within the con-
cept of the LP record that the
songs were written, and in their
juxtaposition to each other they
achieve their greatdst effective-
ness.
Honesty pervades the album;
,honesty to the group's audience,
and honesty to the group itself.
Crosby, Stills and Nash play the
music they know best in the
best way they know, so develop-
ing a mutual respect between
audiences and artist.
"If you smile at me I will un-
derstand, 'cause that is some-
t h i n g everybody everywhere
does in the s a m e language."
"Wooden Ships," a futuristic
tableau set in the aftermath of
IR~

nuclear holocaust, envelops the
listener with waves of cataclys-
mic emotion. Survivors gather
together, sailing "Wooden Ships
on the water very f r e e, and
easy." The ultimate absurdity of
mankind's self-destruction be-
c o m e s overpowering w h e n
"There's just one thing I've got
to know, can you tell me please,
who won?"

Familiarity with t h e
does not breed contempt,
en indifference, for the.

album
or ev-
music

misunderstanding of it. A cycle
lays exposed, continually switch-
ing its emphasis from simplicity
to complexity and back.
"It's been a long time comin,'
It's going to be a long t i m e
gone." Written the day after
the assassination of Robert
Kennedy, "Long Time Gone" is
David Crosby's version of the
state of the nation. "Speak out,
you got to speak out against ;
the madness, you got to speak
your mind if you dare. But don't
try to get yourself elected. If
you do you had better-cut your
hair." Crosby's vocal manages
to be simultaneously vengeful,
mournful, pessimistic and opti-
mistic. Punctured by a gunfire-
like guitar, the lyrics blend
smoothly with the ominous or-
gan soundings forcing their way
forward from the rear.
Now they are four. "Don't let
the past remind us of what we
are not now."

STUDNT 00K S1RVIC
KILLER SALE
CONTINUES
EVERYTHING ridiculously Reduced in Price
ALL USED BOOKS
AT 50% OFF
AND MORE
ALL NEW BOOKS

has an aptitude for being sim-
ultaneously simple and complex.
With each listening, new sounds
emerge, and old ones seem
changed. Nary a note is spared;
neither is one wasted. At alter-
nate times the songs embody
the heights ' of simplicity and
complexity, to the point that
the two s o o n become inter-
changeable. To illustrate this
concept: as the words I have
just written communicate them-
selves to the reader, he under-
stands that on the most basic
level they are merely ink typed
on paper in some sort of pat-
tern. While comprehending this,
he also realizes the pattern is
decipherable, and that it repre-
sents the substance of certain
thoughts that the writer is at-
tempting to communicate. Yet
still closer examination may -e-
veal the preceding sentences to
be obscure or meaningless. The
degree to which the reader un-
derstands this illustration will
therefore in fact depend on his

I

AT 20% OF

ANC
ALL WEEK
-- ~ ~

D MORE

ail
Open till 9 P.M.
~~ ~ ~-i

1'

HELD OVER FOR A 5TH WEEK
"The last word
in thrillers.

Commons to

host exhiit
The sixth annual purchase ex-
hibition, sponsored by the Mich-
igan Education Association and
Michigan Art Education Associa-
tion, will open at the Univer-
sity of Michigan at 8 p.m. April
6, in North Campus Commons.
It will run through April 18.
. All the work on exhibition is
done by Michigan residents who
are currently teaching art in a
public or private institution, in-
cluding elementary and second-
ary schools or institutions of
higher learning in Michigan.
This year for the first time the
exhibition is open to college sen-
iors who have done, or who are
currently, practice teaching.
The work purchased by the
M.E.A. will be hung in t h e i r
.Headquarters lding, B in East
Lansing, the new M.E.A. Con-
ference Center at St. Mary's
Lake near Battle Creek, and in
regional M.E.A. offices around
the state.
Michigan is one of few states,
in the U.S. that gives the teach-
er-artist real recognition by ex-
hibiting and purchasing his
work. Colored slides have been
made of all the work purchased
by the MEA and can be loaned
from the M.E.A. Headquarters
in East Lansing.
Program Info: Nd 2-4264
HELD OVER!

Last night's program at Hill'
Aud. followed the standard lines
established many years ago by
former director Philip Dewey
(or perhaps by someone before
him?). The classical numbers,
the folk songs, the spirituals,;
the "modern numbers," and of
course those grand old favorites,
the Michigan songs, were all
sung with the usual gusto and
fervor. These components con-
stitute the metaphysical boun-:
daries of the Glee Club world.'
Within those boundaries, the
club furnishes its environment.
The male voices.swell like a gi-
gantic organ in numbers such as
Wagner's "Chorus of the Re-
turning Pilgrims." And then
there is the "show-stopper" -
Roger Holtz singing the tenor
solo in "Nachthelle" by Schu-
bert.
These traditional elements
ara matched by a mild icono-
clasm in the form of director
Willis Patterson singing solos
in "Were You There" and
"What the World Needs Now."
Mr. Patterson has a fine bari-
tone voice - whether he should
sing solos while serving as the
club's director is a matter for
debate.
Additional iconoclasm is fur-
nished by Patterson's arrange-
ments of "MacArthur Park"
and "Wichita Lineman" - sub-
stitued in place of Dewey's 1930
vintage medleys. Unfortunately,

Thus, when confronted with
"Five Nature Studies," written
especially for the club by a
composer named Schmutz,' the
men seemed a little uncomfort-
able (perhaps because of too
little rehearsal). The tight, and
often dissonant harmony of
Schmutz's w o r k simply didn't
sound as well performed as the
big major chords of earlier
numbers.
The club is really in its ele-
ment when it comes time for the
Michigan songs, drawn from old
Michigan operas and the great
football days of the turn of the
century. One has visions of ivy-
covered walls, Mr. Chips and
ancient drinking hideouts during
this section of the concert. It is
an essential part of tradition,
that permeates the Glee Club
world. Like all traditons, the
songs become somewhat tire-
some after one or two, but the
men perform the "works" with
such vigor that the audience is
pleased.
The theme of last night's con-
cert, "What the World Needs
Now," indicates an attempt by
the club to change its world to
meet modern standards. "What
the world needs now is love,"
announced director Patterson.
This is indeed so, and the men
presented kn enjoyable concert
on that theme. But what the
Glee Club world needs now is
less tradition and more good new
ideas.

DIAL 5-6290
NOMINATED FOR 10
ACADEMY AWARDS
"FOUR STARS* * * * HIGHEST
RATING ... A GRATIFYING
ACHIEVEMENT."
-Wanda Hale, N.Y. Daily News
"EPIC BATTLE OF THE SEXES:"
-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times

' damn near
knocks 'you out
of your seat."
-Pauline Kael, The
New Yorker

'1"errific. "Enough intrigue
^^*nd excitement to

I

I

--cuene onam, 1600K MOYiX Inv

eclipse lames Band."
PLAYBOY

Afro-American
studies Lecture
C.LR. JAMES
Federal City College
Author of
Black Jacobins
Monday, April 6
8:00 P.M.
"Black Nationalism"
AUDITORIUM A,
ANGELL HALL

RIC.HARD)
BURTON
GENEVIEVE
BUJOLD
IN THE
HAL WALLiSPROUCTtON
tI'eAousaziS Deg
I VYERA PTMM .TEWDLC~OreP*AMSM" GP 4M
Shows at
1:10-3:40-6:15-9:00

I

Academy Award Nomination-Best Picture of the Year
FRI DAY-MON DAY SATURDAY-SUNDAY
at at
6:45-9.00 DIAL 668-6416 1 :45-3:45-6:15-8:45

T
I.

Cinema V

GREAT DIRECTORS' FESTIVAL

I

"I
4'

DOUBLE FEATURE-ENDS TODAY

I

U

-7

"P e r h .a p s the most
beautiful m o v i e in
history"-Newsweek

MORGAN
11 is

I
0

.

11

WORSHIP

"HOWLINGLY
FUNNY"
-Bosly Crowther. New York -ow
"HILARIOUS"
-Tune MaznqA

FIRST UNITED
CHURCH AND'
FOUNDATION

METHODIST
WESLEY

Fiwira
Ma.4 n
'Elvira'-1 :00, 4:05, 7:15, 10:45

BEST ACTRESS Cannes Festival
'Morgan'-2:30, 5:35, 9:00

DOUBLE FEATURE-SUNDAY, MONDAY, TUESDAY

"TOTA L INSANITY
... PROVOKES
UNCONTROL-
ABLE LAUGHTER."
-Mich. Daily

I

"A very beautiful, very
romantic movie."
-New York Times
"'More'.is tough, can-
did stuff, clearly
among the good
ones."

At State pnd Huron Streets
Church-662-4536
Weslev-668-6881
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Campus Minister
R. Edward McCracken, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m. - "Caught Between
Shock and Assurance.
6:00 p.m.-Dinner in the Pine Room.
7:00 p.m.--Program.
THURSDAY
7:30 p.m.--Communion.
SATURDAY
Young Marrieds progressive dinner.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00'a.m.-Holv Communion.
10:00 a.m.-Morning Prover and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evenina Prayer.
ST. AIDAN'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
1679 Broadway
(at Baits Drive-North Campus)
12:15 p.m.-Holy Eucharist.
EDGAR CAYCE MEDITATION
AND STUDY GROUPS
For anyone interested in ioining, a meeting
will be held Sun., April 5 at 2:00 p.m. at
310$S. State:
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
On the Campus-
Corner State and William Sts.
Terry N. Smith, Minister
Ronald C. Phillips, Assistant
9:15 and 11:00 a.m. - "The Redemptive
Community," Ron Phillips preaching.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(corner of Forest and Washtenaw)
Minister: Rev. Wesley Smedes
10 X00 a.m.-"Do You Love Me?," Russel PaIs-
rok preaching.
6:00 p.m.-"The Greatest Sing (In Critique
of Solomon) "-new oratorio by Dr. Calvin
Seerveld.
UNITY CENTER OF
PRACTICAL CHRISTIANITY
310 S. State
663-4314
Mrs, Eleore Krafft, Minister
Sunday Service-11:00 a.m.
Study Class-Mrs. Krafft-7:30 p.m. Tuesday.
Prayer and Counseling-10:00 a.m. Wednes-
day.
Center Is Open-Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
1 -2: Tuesday, 3-6 pm.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
493 S. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6149
Ministers: T. L. Trost, Jr. R. E. Simonson,
W. C. Wtiaht
Worship Services-9:30 and1 11:00 a.m.
Church School-9:30 and 11:00 a.m.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Sunday at 9:30 and at 11:00 a.m.-Services.
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta Supper-
Program.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Service.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 East Huron
Phone 662-3153
Ministers: Calvin S. Malefvt and Poul Swets
10:30 a.m.-Prof. J. Lawrence Burkholder,
Harvard Divinity School.
6:30 p.m.-Recital of Sacred Music; Virginia
Robison, Soprano.

"Funnies
the year.

t Picture of
."

-E. Villaqe Other
yY t

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
3150 Glacier Way
Pastor: Charles Johnson
For information, transportation, personalized
help, etc. phone 769-6299 or 761-6749.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CHAPEL
A.L.C.-L.C.A.
HilI St. at S. Forest Ave.
Donald G. Z il., Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 a.m.-Folk Mass.
9:30 a.m.-Biblical Encounter Group.
11:00 a.m.-Matins.
6:00 p.m.-Supper and Program-"The Holy
Man Myth."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenow Ave.
SUNDAY
1 .'f1 .. _ Alrr.nCmr t c~ r1tllll [A

Al

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