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April 01, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-04-01

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Page Two
On Richt
By R. A
Sviatoslav Richter, the grea
last night at Hill Aud., under
Musical Society, that was a super
concerts.
I first made acquaintance v
Moussorgsky's Pictures at an Ex
important recordings of the last
the digital onslaught with which
ramic scene of the Great Gatec
It was this same Olympian pow
night applied to the demonic j
movement of Prokofiev's Seven
the house - and almost the pian
Though Richter's performan
last word (whatever that means)
will claim that he lacks tendern
neverthless always have someth
they are always filled with surpri
for instance, to his version of the
with Von Karaj an.) Richter is
the keyboard - with an individu
The first half of the progra
ations by Beethoven, the Six V
atlons, O. 76, and the Fifteen
Richter played all three'sets wit
the structure, the compositional
tion form with a clarity that co.
Opus 34 set is a relatively.simpl
emerge simply as charming in i
it, however, with a sense of exp
Beethoven working out the varia
buoyant adventure and the pian
permutations of the march them
Yet it was in the Op. 35 set,
cise, that Richter's grasping int
thing really lifted the audience
where attention is riveted on
communicated. I can honestly s
truly detect and follow what Be
tion, and that I found the experi
Part II of the concert offere
Prokofiev's Seventh Piano Sona
boring as his Beethoven was excil
skelter scattering of moods and
arching sense of Romantic senti
it emotional meaning. Richter's
he admirably did not wear his h
to prove his heart was in his (eno:
Prokofiev's Seventh, Sonata
Richter's hands, and the pianist
intensity. The driving, ingenius
more convincting (echoes of Ki
that the quiet moments made the
DAILY OFFIC
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B 1 d g., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student orgniza-
tion notices ar e not accepted for
publication. F o r more informa-
tion, phone 764-4270.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 1
Day Calendar
Social Work and Psychology Lec-
ture: Patricia Morrissey, Fordham,
"The Black Nationalism and the
Changing Negro Family", 2065 Frieze
Bldg., 2:00 p.m.
Statistics Seminar: Dr. M. L. Puri,
Indiana U., "On Some Problems of
Multidimensional Independence," 2433
Mason Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Physics Colloquium: P. M. Platzman,
Bell" Labs, "Compton Scattering of X-
rays from Electrons", P&A Colloq. Rm.,
4:00 p.m.
Student (Student Lab Theater):
Slcenes from "Fasust I, Ana Theater,
Frieze Bldg., 4:30p.m. Bar
P u r d einar ChasBacer
P u rd ue, "Endomembrane Systems

in Relation to Growth and Differentia-
tion of Fungal Cells," 1139 Nat. Set.,
4:15 p.m.L
Student Affairs Counseling Seminar
on Drugs: Dr. Jas. Richards, "Legal
Aspects of Drug Use" Michigan Un-
ion Dining Rms, 1, 2 & 3, 7:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Louisa Thornton,
mezzo soprano, School of Music Re-
cital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Plcement Service
Pea e Corps Week, all week, H e a d-
N UM

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, Avil 1, 1970

USiC INSTITUTIONAL POWER:
er at Hill LSA gov't: Building
. PERRY (Continued from Page 1) about through systmatic chan-
t Russian pianist, gave a recital "We're only involved in this in nels."
a very small ,way," he adds. "We "We have to work our way into
the auspices of the University agreed to submit the proposal, so the system, and so we have to
b finale to a season of outstanding we endorsed the idea of the stu- start from point zero and do just
dent government. But we're not about everything," he adds. "But
with Richter on his recording of really pushing it." then we haven't done anything
hibition, certainly one of the most Ultimately, if the faculty d o e s wrong yet, either."
hibteen, yerainl.Ineateo sntnot accept student authority in Gene Kallenberg, another mem-
fifteen years. In that performance, the college, it could prove devis- ber of the Executlve Council, also
Richter thundered out the pano- ive for the government if some believes the novelty of the govern-
of Kiev was literally hair-raising. students call for militant tactics ment will give students an op-
er and control that Richter last to accelerate the implementation portunity to "demonstrate to the
azz rhythms of the "Precipitato" of changes they seek. faculty that students can act dif-
th Piano Sonata, bringing down But David Brand, president of ferently than the way they are
o executive council, believes that it normally seen as a group."
is the very newness of the organi- "If they're going to get any-
ces on records are never quite the zation that may prevent such a where, the students must show
or completely satisfying - some situation from developing. they can work with faculty as in-
ess and warmth - his renditions "Our newness will aid us because dividuals on the committees, and
ing uniquely interesting to say; we don't have a bad reputation," not just with vindictiveness be-
sing insights and delights. (Refer, he says. "Thus, if we're tactful in cause the faculty are not moving
Tchaikovsky First Piano Concerto our approach to the faculty, we as fast as the students would like
a master technician - he owns have a better chance of seeing to see," he explains.
alist's sensibility, some of our proposals brought What the 'Executive Council
m consisted of three sets of vari-o
arations with 4Fugue, Op. 3.s i l p t rin
h exemplary lucidity; he revealed
artifice of the -theme-and-varia- 0"* 0i
uld only be called revelatory. The universities in Spain
e one that could, in lesser hands,
tformal niceties; Richter played
loration that enabled one to feel MADRID (P) - Spanish police gency for all Spain, effective last
liens. The Opus 76 set is a more are s t il patrolling university Jan. 25, after a wave of student
itins.TheOpu 7 se isa mrecampuses, 15 months after Gen. and labor unrest erupted. It cu-
ist's complete technique made the Francisco Franco cracked down minated whens angry students
e much more than merely jocular- on student unrest. tried to throw the rector of Bar-
a longer and more complex exer- Big disorders seem a thing of celona University from his office
eaet and ability to reveal -every- the past, but discontent and grum- window.
~letadaiiy orva vr-bing continue. Franco ordered both Madrid and
into the seldom reached realm "You are not going to solve the Barcelona univers d ad
the musical form/content being problem by invading the campus then suspended five basic civil
ay that for the first time I could with police," says an economics rights. News media went under
ethoven was doing in each varia- student who sees Marxism as the censorship and police, fanned out
ence exhilarating, solution to the natiop's social ills, looking for agitators.
Buthe nd isfriends amtte
d Schumann's Fantasiestucke andaBut he and his ritn admit they The decree, : originally for 90
are a "minor minority."dlfe f h
ta. Richter's Schumann was as The bulk of the 45,000 students days, was lifted after two months.
ting. Schumann's work is a helter- at the University of Madrid walk But the police stayed on.
motifs, and it requires an over- to class with hardly a glance at "It is almost iMpossible to have
nent to tie it all together and give the police. This is a sharp change a political life on the campus to-
approach was far too pianistic; if from a year ago when the univer- day because of los grises,'the gray-
heart on his sleeve, he still failed sity averaged only for months of uniformed police," says one pro-
rmous) chest. classes. dessor. "In a minute the police
Franco ordered a state of emer- end it."
received its world premiere in Armed with nightsticks and
still plays it with a mind-boggling sidearms, the police are posted in
rhythms could not have bee. every major building but do not
ev's Gate), but I am not certain enter the classrooms.
most of Prokofiev's pathos. The situation is the same in
*1 eiBarcelona,with an enrollment of
4_n .enu t ,a, fl more than 28,000.
A L BU LETINOne Madrid student says there
IAL BULLETIN g "'
I(continued from Page l) are no antigovernment meetings
perform such operations for any on his campus now, no real dem-
" erform.onstrations and few posters. He
reason, > says too many leaders have been
mmWMEEEMEN#-#EEN5%##EreRefusal to operate in other in- swyspt int te police net. The gov
quarters, 3529 SAB, call Miss Webber, stances can be the grounds for epintouncednat.Theenof
764-7460. Tonight and Thurs., films civil action by a patient. ernment announced at the end of
shown, s p.m., 3rd floor SA.Thamn etoncvlibl-2 the two months' emergency that
show, 8 ~m.,3rd loorSA..The amendment on civil liabil- 208 persons had been arrested and
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE ity was added early Tuesday by 20 deported
212 SAB, Lower Level the Senate before that body ap- Tereede
Interviews at Summer Placement: proved the, measure on a 23-18 There is evidence, however, that
APRIL 1: Classic Crafts Corps, Sum- vote-one more than needed, student and faculty dissidents are
mer College Program as .company rep., The Ho svote was n78-43eee, six going underground and changing
car ne. their tactics.
ANNOUNCEMENTS: more than needed. In antigovernment demonstra-
Library Futures, N.Y., cadet program Meanwhile in New York, the state tions in January, for example stu-
for N.Y.C. and environs. assembly began debate Monday ondeiade att-k
Union Carbide, Tonawanda N.Y., gen. idents staged guerrilla-like attacks
and mech. engrs. completed Jr. Yr, (M whether to adopt a bill liberalizing on the police in a half dozen spots
and F). the state's abortion laws. Of the of .Madrid. Twenty students were
Elmhurst, Ill., summer forestry pro- 76 votes needed to pass bill the aid.
gram, good salary.dean.
NASA, Greenbelt,:Md., completed soph. Assembly sponsors of the reform The government has moved two
yr. in soc. sci., research and develop- bill had earlier reported they had active schools, economics and po-
ment jobs in public admin., apply be- 71 firm votes for the bill and were litical sciences, more than six
fore April 30. optimistic that debate would sway miles from the main campus.
gg, ohsgg g Fatgg gg ;..-gg ~ the necessary five votes for final Off campus, Mundo Obrero,
passage. Workers' World, the organ of the
ORGANIZATION The assembly is considering an central committee of the Com-
amended version of the bill passed munist party in Spain, is handed
NOTICES by the senate last Monday. The round from notebook to notebook.
senate version would have permit- There are reports of a unit of the
t . "gi l ts?°?a° n s °n ted, without restriction, an abor- Palestine Liberation Front. Che
Bach Club meeting, Wed., April 1, tion when agreed to by the pros- Guevara and Fidel Castro are
8:00 p.m.; 1236 Washtenaw (at S. For- pective mother and her doctor. heroes with left-leaning students.
est, near S. Univ.). Live performance of Amendments in the Assembly The government crackdown has
TAch's Sonata in E major for violinthso
and piano and Concerto in C'Minor for have changedthso permit such support from middle-class and
violin and oboe (victoria Haltom, vio- abortions only during the first 24 blue-collarw o r kers. They find
lin; Robert Allen, oboe; Dorthea Arne weeks of pregnancy. After that leftist demonstrations a paradox
and Sheryl Faba, piano). Refreshments period, an abortion would be per- as the Franco government tries to
and fun afterwards. Everybody wel- mitted only when the life of the open bridges to the Communist
comet (No musical knowledge needed.) mte nywe h ieo h pnbigst h omns

663-2827, 761-7356. prospective mother was in danger. bloc.
,Graduating ~ .~ ~ S
Seniors ...*..
40I
Graduation
Announcements
ARE ON SALE AT THE
Information Desk-L.S.A. Building

Wednesday. Aoril 1 1970

V

a machine

Young files charges
on Parsons with CSJ

hopes to do is build support
through a broadly based institu-
tional effort rather than through
radicalizing experiences centering
around particular issues which at
times capture the interest of the
student body. Planning and edu-
cational campaigns will have to
be rather long range, unlike those
engaged in by SGC and other
campus interest groups.
"We have to get into the bureau-
cracies and establish ourselves in
many places," says Brand. "Un-
fortunately, that does not appear
to be a substantive change because
it will be rather invisible and it
doesn't involve issues."
"But establishing ourselves in
itself is substantive because it will
provide mechanisms which even-
tually will initiate change on is-
sues," he concludes.
Thus, if the Literary College
Student Government ever does get
organized in the manner which it
hopes to, it may usher in a com-
pltely new era in the struggle for
student decision-making power.
For it would represent the first
time students had' been provided
with an opportunity to use insti-
tutional power from the inside in-
stead of moving unwilling admin-
istrators with confrontations from
the outside.
IMilliken'
backs aims
(Continued from Page 1)
people want to know what's going
on.''
Milliken, on the other hand, de-
scribed the dispute over black en-
rollment as an internal matter
which the universities and colleges
of the state must handle.
He said that he did not want
to set himself up as "some kind
of an educational czar attempt-
in& to influence or be involved in
every internal decision at t h i s
university or any other college
or university."
Calling for understanding on the
part of all sides, Milliken c o m-
mented, that "polarization to a
substantial degree had taken
place at th University."
lb

(Continued from Page 1)
Z which Student Government Coun-
cil regulations were violated in
t the alleged action. There is no
SGC regulation specifically deal-
ing with assault of a faculty mem-
ber.
CSJ Chairman Ed Kussy ex-
plained that assault charges are
dealt with under civil authorities.
"CSJ is not a criminal court,"
Kussy said. "SGC rules are draft-
ed not to conflict with rules in-
volved in civil court proceedings."
He added, that the interests of the
two courts are not the same.
It appears, however, that the
alleged action would be in viola-
* tion of an SGC rule prohibiting
acts that "significantly interfere
with the free movement of persons
or things, on the campus."
Young also isrprosecuting Par-
tsons in civil court for assault and
battery in the same incident. The
trial may be held as soon as April
16, Parsons said last night.
Literary college Dean William
Hays summarily suspended Par-
yns March 7'for allegedly strik-
ing Young, but lifted the suspen-
sion March 13 after he said evi-
dence had arisen casting "suffi-
cient doubt on the validity of the
suspension. . ." The suspension
was removed from Parsons' record.
The dispute in the College Re-
publicans originated when 79 peo-
ple, eligible to vote according to
BACH CLUB
presents
A Live Performance:
SONATA IN
E MAJOR--BAC H
Victoria Haltom, violin
Dorthea Arne, piano
CONCERTO IN
C MINOR-BACH
Victoria Haltom, violin
Robert Allen, oboe
Sheryl Faba, piano
with brief remarks by
Miss Haltom
WED., APRIL 1, 8 P.M.
1236 Woshtenaw (S.W. cor-
ner of S. Forest & Washtenaw,
i block N. of S. Univ.)
Everyone Invited!
Refreshments &.FUN afterwards
663-2827.,761-7356

the plaintiffs, were denied the
right to vote. at the March 11 elec-
tion of officers.
The defendants, including Mike
Kunich, the elected chairman,,
claim that the 79 people were not
eligible because their dues had
not been placed in the club's gen-
eral fund.
The club is generally split be-
tween a liberal and a conservative
faction, witnesses asserted last'
night. Members of the liberal fac-
tion are contesting the fairness of
the election, they said.

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THE U of M MEN'S GLEE CLUB
proudly presents
THE U of M MEN'S GLEE CLUB
in their -Spring Concert:
WHAT THE, WORLD, NEEDS NOW

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April 3,08:30
Hill Auditorium

Ticket Sales at Hill Box Office,
Fishbowl, Diog
Prices -$2, $2.50, $3. Hurry

r,

Roger
Renwick.

Announces
INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS- 1970-71
CHORAL UNION SERIES
H Ril Auditorium

&

Barry
O'Neill

DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA ..:........ .
Sixten Ehrling, Conductor; Judith Raskin, Soprano soloist
L'ORCHESTRE NATIONAL FRANCAIS .
jean Martinon, Conductor
MELBOURNE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Wille" van Otterloo, Conductor (Program recognition of
the 25th anniversary of the United Nations)
LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA .........
Zubin, Mehta, Conductor

2 30, Sun., Sept. 27
Mon., Oct. 12
Sat., Oct. 24
Sat., Nov. 7

4

6 ~
WED.-APRIL 1
High Noon
dir. FRED ZIMMERMAN
(1952)

You saw them at
the Ceilidh; lnoW
sit black, relax,
and join them for
the weekend.
Canadian, Irish,
American, English
Folk Music

EMIL GILELS, Pianist Wed., Nov. 18
"ORPHEUS IN THE UNDERWORLD" (Offenbach) -
Canadian Opera Company ........... . . .Sat., Jan. 9
BEVERLY SILLS, Soprano ............................... .. Sat., Jan. 30
ISAAC STERN, Violinist.......................... . . 2:30, Sun., Feb. 21
MENUHIN FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA ..............Wed., Mar. 10
Yehudi Menuhin, Conductor and soloist
MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, Celllist ... Mon., Mar. 15
SEASON TICKETS: $35.00-$30.00-$25.00-$20.00-$15.00
DANCE SERIES
Hil Auditorium
PENNSYLVANIA BALLET COMPANY............... ... Sat., Oct. 17
MARTHA GRAHAM AND DANCE COMPANY .......,..... Mon., Oct. 26
BAYANIHAN PHILIPPINE DANCE COMPANY ....Sat., Nov. 21
ALVIN AILEY AMERICAN DANCE THEATER ......Fri., Feb. 12
LES GRANDS BALLETS CANADIENS. :. Sat., Apr. 3
SEASON TICKETS: $17.50--$15.00-$12.50-$10.00-$7.50
CHAMBER ARTS SERIES
Rackham Auditoriuna

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NEXT WEEK:
Norman
Kennedy
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Greatest
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kI~WD.
*-:30 £04

PAUL KUENTZ CHAMBER ORCHESTRA OF PARIS.
SOLISTI DI ZAGREB . . ......
MOSCOW TRIO ....................
ELAINE SHAFFER, Flutist; and
HEPHZIBAH MENUHIN,- Pianist.
FESTIVAL WINDS . . . ..... .. . . .......
GUARNERI STRING QUARTET .....

Thurs., Oct. 15
.. Wed., Nov. 4
Fri., Nov. 13
Mon., Jan. 19
Tues., Feb. 2
Thurs., Feb. 25

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