100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 28, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



lw
omomdmw I

page three

FRESHMEN
APPLICATIONS ARE BEING ACCEPTED
FOR
SOPH SHOW

Cl4e

M.. ir rt ttn

DaiItv

NET'S PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Saturday, March 28, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

II

t4

CENTRAL COMMITTEE
The annual theatrical production run
entirely by SOPHOMORES.
Applications AVAILABLE at UAC Offices
2nd floor Union or call 764:8718
Sat. and Sun. - March 28,29
The Seventh Seal'
dir. INOMAR BERGMAN (1956)
"God is dead or death is God"
The film is here.
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75C AUDITORIUM

Nixon
firm on
Carswell
KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. (Pi) --
White House press secretary Ron-
ald Ziegler yesterday said t hat
President Nixon is still standing
firmly and confidently behind
Judge G. Harrold Carswell's nomi-
nation to the Supreme Court.
The reaffirmation of support for
Carswell came in response to ques-
tions about a Miami Herald story
from Washington which said the
administration is making no spec-
ial lobby efforts on behalf of the
nomination.
The Herald also reported that
one Senate source said the Presi-
dent was somewhat discouraged by
widespread opposition to C a r s -
well in the Senate and the legal
community.
A vote to recommit the Carswell
nomination is .scheduled for April
6 in the Senate. If the nomination
survives that test, a vote on con-
firmation has been set for April
8.
Sen. Frank Moss, D-Utah, yes-
terday became the 34th senator to
publicly announce his opposition to
Carswell. Forty senators are on re-
cord in support.
Asked whether Nixon still is op-
timistic about the nomination,
Ziegler replied: "Yes, very much
so. The President is confident
Judge Carswell will be confirmed.
He stands behind him and sup-
ports him in all aspects of the
debate."
Ziegler said no consideration
whatever was being given to with-
drawing the nomination and there
was no indication Carswell would
ask that it be pulled back.

3

strikes face U. S.
WASHINGTON (A) - Nationwide trucking negotiations
collapsed yesterday, leaving the possibility of work stoppages
in the airline, train and trucking industries
The new major labor crisis came during spreading flight
delays of the nation's airlines in a slowdown by federal air
traffic controllers, and warnings from rail union leaders that
their long-simmering wage and job-jurisdiction dispute could
explode into a nationwide strike at any moment despite a
temporary lid imposed by Congress.
In the trucking conflict, Teamsters Union acting presi-
dent Frank E. Fitzsimmons said, "Negotiations for renewal
of the national freight agreement have reached an impasse."

transportation

-Associated Press.
TEMPORARILY GROUNDED passengers lounge and sleep on the floor of LaGuardia airport.
PICKET FOOD SERVICE:
Students show gt reactons

I

1I

iii I

STUDENT BOOK SGRVICE

KILLER SALE
EVERYTHING ridiculously
Reduced in Price.
ALL USED BOOKS
AT 50% OFF
AND MORE

By MICHAEL SCHNECK
Students in the University res-
ident hall system had a chance to
show their commitment to the
cause of the Black Action Move-
ment (BAM) yesterday as pickets
prevented cafeteria workers from
entering dormitories to prepare
food.
Reaction to sacrificing their
stomachs varied widely among
the affected students.

"Why don't you call the po- ganizations such as the Cantebury
lice," screamed a girl in South House agreed to serve food to stu-
Quad. The dietician explained dents. The food was free though
that the presence of police would the coalition urged that contri-
only cause more trouble. butions be made.
"I paid for this food and they Food was served all day in the
have no right to deprive me of 'it," Fish Bowl and in the lobby of
the girl continued. South Quad.
Other students were favorable Approximately 40 pickets were
to the strike, also at the plant department
Sthik it'satibubuilding on Hoover street wherfl
"I think it's a tribute to the they attempted to prevent main-
organization that they were suc- tenance personnel from entering
cessful in shutting down the foo and leaving the building.
service." said another South Quad

ALL NEW BOOKS
AT 20% OFF
AND MORE

II
the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
CHRISTIAN-DEMOCRAT MARIANO RUMOR was named
premier of Italy yesterday, thus ending a 49-day government
crisis.
Italy has been in )a political turmoil for over a month as leaders
-~ of the Christian Democrat party have been trying to form a center-
ileft coalition.
The new government consisting of the Christian Democrats,
the Italian Socialists, the Unitarian Socialists and the small Republi-
can party will be sworn in today.

ALL WEEK

Open till 9 P.M.

IIIL

I

hi

I

'I

h IN 1

BEDAZZLED

FIGHTING IN CAMBODIA increased yesterday as the Viet
Cong attacked the Cambodian army and South Vietnamese
forces clashed with Viet Cong.
South Vietnamese rangers claimed they killed 53 Viet Cong
in an attack on a Viet Cong stronghold two miles inside Cambodia
with support of Vietnamese jets.
Meanwhile, Cheng Heng, the Cambodian provisional head of
state, declared in a nationwide radio broadcast that the Viet Cong
"have begun actions against the Cambodian people and our soldiers
in provinces near the border."
* * *
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT spokesmen said yesterday it will
strengthen regulations affecting radioactive emissions from
nuclear power plants.
An Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) spokesman agreed that
the new regulations would essentially mean "a closer watch on exist-
ing plants to assure continuance of operation well within maximum'
standard - and they would give even greater assurance that future
plants would have more built-in safeguards to assure operation well
within standards."

occupant.
Other students took the attitude
of a non-striking though sympa-
thetic engineer who commented,
"as long as it isn't indefinite, its
a good tactic to directly involve
more people in the demands."
"I think it is necessary though
it does entail a certain amount
of personal inconvenience," said
a striker.
Many students took the attitude
of a disappointed breakfaster who
said, "I'm not sure exactly whatI
this accomplishes by keeping peo-
ple from eating, but I can go for
one day without food."
The two largest dorms on cen-
tral campus - West and South
Quads - had no food all day.
On the Hill, the dorms with the
exception of Alice Lloyd had their
foor service curtailed for s o m e
part of the day.
Mr. Ennen, director of Stock-
well, said "The kitchen crew is
out and we will not serve regular
meals." He added, however, that
breakfast meals were used all day
> long with beans and soup served
for supper.
At Markley there was no break-
fast or lunch but dinner was serv-
ed.
One student joined the Mark-
ley Hall picketers with a s i g n
reading "We want food."
Plans for feeding students who
did not have any food from their
dorms were formulated by the
Coalition to Support BAM.
Various churches and other or-

Alabama voter
tempted by
country musie
MONTGOMERY, Ala. RP) --
Voters who show up at political
rallies in Alabama like country
music, and the candidates for gov-
ernor this year, as usual, are giv-
ing it to them - in large and
expensive doses.
The bill for campaign enter-
tainment alone is running into
thousands ofndollars a week. And
the cast includes some of t h e
biggest names in the country mu-
sic field, such as Roy C 1 a r k,
Jeanie C. Riley, and Sonny James.
Campaign workers who b o o k
the entertainers are close-.mouth-
ed about how much they pay. But
if the performers got what they'
normally charge, Gov. Albert
Brewer and former Gov. George
C. Wallace, the two major candi-
dates, would have spent something
like $30,000 in the first two weeks
of the campaign.
However, in both headquarters,
campaign aides say it isn't cost-
ing them anything like that much.
Wallace also has had Grand
Ole Opry singers. Later, his head-
quarters says, he plans to have
the entire "Hee Haw" cast for two
performances.

The current contract covering
425,000 truck drivers, expires
Tuesday midnight.
The breakoff came after t h e
Teamsters rejected a three-year
industry offer to hike wages and
benefits nearly $1 per hour, in-
cluding 75 cents an hour in
wages.
The union reportedly is insist-
zng on at last $1.70 more pay per
hour, plus other major benefits.
Most of the truckers now average
$4 hourly in wages.
Trucking negotiations three years
ago broke out in a rash of hit-and-
run Teamsters strikes across the
country and a nationwide indus-
try lockout in retaliation before it
was finally settled.
Leaders of four AFL-CIO rail-
road shopcraft unions, meanwhile,
said they are on the verge of los-
ing control of their 45,000 mem-
bers who have waited 15 months
for a pay raise.
"A strike is almost certain,"
said one source, expressing doubt
that union leaders can hold t h e
rail workers in line even until the
37-day no-strike law enacted by
Congress expires April 11.
President Nixon asked Congress
to impose as binding for the rest
of this year a rail settlement in-
cluding a 68-cent hike in current
wages of $3.60 an hour plus a
controversial provision to let mem-
bers of all four unions do a limit-
ed amount of work in each others'
jealously guarded traditional job
jurisdictions.
Three of the unions have agreed,
but the fourth - Sheet M e t a l
Workers - refused, fearing the
loss of jobs to the other unions.
Congress ducked the politically
dangerous decision to impose a
settlement of wages and working
conditions on American workers
for only the second time in peace-
time history and voted the tem-
porary delay instead.
Meanwhile, airlines were forced
to cancel more than 200 flights
yesterday at the peak of the yebr's
second busiest travel period, be-
cause 25 per cent of air traffic
controllers stayed home.
It was the third day of a pro-
test by members of the Profes-
sional Air Traffic Controllers' Or-
ganization (PATCO) against what
they claim is overwork, under-pay,
under-staffing and obsolete equip-
ment.
Only 1,213 Men-of a normal
force of 1,625-showed up at the
21 centers that direct airlines
once they leave airport control.
And, in increasing numbers, t h e
controllers at airports reported
they were ill.

Establish
mal talks,
deadline
WASHINGTON (3)-The leader
of the nation's letter carriers has
set a new nationwide postal strike
deadline of 2 p.m. next Thursday
if there is no breakthrough on a
pay increase-but he reportedly is
optimistic the deadline will be
met.
Government and union negotia-
tors announced they had "reached
a basis for negotiations", at a ses-
sion that ran past midnight Thurs-
day, and they scheduled more
talks for yesterday afternoon.
But key congressmen said they
expect no settlement over the
weekend. Congress, in any event,
could not take any final action be-
fore next Tuesday.
The administration has made a
counter proposal to union demands
for a 12 to 20 per cent raise but
security was to tight that even the
House-Senate conferees awaiting
a settlement on which to act- said
they had no idea what it was.
James H. Rademacher, presi-
dent of the AFL-CIO National As-
sociation of Letter Carriers, who
threatened a walkout in five days
if there is noibreakthrough, was
quoted by a union source as being
optimistic but as saying the five
days expire at 2 p.m. Thursday
because of the Easter recess.
"I have to go by the mandate
of my group," the source quoted
Rademacher as sayig. "Unless
there is some kind of evidence of
agreement being reached, next
Thursday is the absolute latest the
way it looks now."
Congress began its Easter recess
Thursday. night. The Senate,
which will act first on any pay
bill, returns Tuesday and the 10-
day House recess is to be cut short
Tuesday if a pay bill is ready for
approval.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University at
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

The Faust story updated by
Peter Cook, Dudley Moore and Raquel Welch
Fri. and Sat.-March 27 and 28-7 and 9:30
Aud. A, Angell Hall, 75c

AND

Sunday Matinee-March 29-1 and 3 P.M.
REBECCA - Directed by Alfred Hitchcock

HI

Cinema V

GREAT DIRECTORS' FESTIVAL

I

i

I

SATURDAY and SUNDAY ONLY
TWO BEST SELLERS -TOGETHER!

Why I Became a
Jewish Draft Resister
ALAN SOLOMONOW
National Director Jewish Peace Fellowship
WED., APRIL 1st, 8 P.M.

A brlNt
-N.Y News
, U l
"Devastating to the well-
tuned funny bone."
-N.Y. TIMES
PETER
SELLERS
HAENS
ABOVEt

"THE BRIGHTEST,
LIVELIEST COMEDY
THIS YEAR!"N Y TIMES
"IT'S A COMIC
MASTER-
PIECE"
-MCCALLS
MAGAZINE
'I'M ALL RIGHT
a
Starring PETER SELLERS
IAN CARMICHAEL TERRY-THOMAS
Screenplay by FRANK OtARVEY and JOHN BOULTING
B a the novel by ALAN HACKNEY
Produced by ROY BOULTING Directed by JOHN SOULTING
A OULTING BROTHERS PRODUCTION

When in Southern California visit Universal Studios
i" HAS THAT YOUTHFUL ACCENT WHICH PLACES
IIN A LEAGUE WITH ZEFFIRELLI'S 'ROMEO AND
JULIET.' "-John Mahoney, FM and Fine Arts Magazine
"AN INSTANT CLASSIC. IT HAS A HAMMER-LOCK ON
HISTORY, PERFORMANCE, PATHOS AND ROOTING
INTEREST!" -Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post
I "EPIC BATTLE OF THE SEXES."-Vincent Canby, N.Y. Times f
RICHAR p~BRTON
asHENRYVI
GENEVIEVE BUJOLD
as ANNE BOLEYN
THE IIALWALLIS PRODUCTION
SCosarrinPAP
IWENE PAPAS

A New Film by Jean-luc Godard
A ''
0k
mpt j('I ' teted
h dh 'I e$Sin it'e
eit Te /g~x t e ei
April 9, 10, 11, 12. Presented by the Wayne Cinema Guild.
Shown in Helen DeRoy Auditorium, located off Clss Avenue
on the Wayne State University Campus. Advance sale re-
served performance tickets $1.50 or $2 at the door. Advance
tickets go on sale Monday, ,March 9 at the University Center
box office. Tickets may also be purchased by sending a
samnedpAsef-.~adressed Prvuelone with the. corretamont inn

i.

CREDENTIALS

1. He burned his draft card.
2. He spent a year in Federal
a draft resister.

.

prison as

3. He is now National Program Direc-
tor of the Jewish Peace Fellowship.

1

I

I

RESPONSE TO HIM WILL BE

Re-release .,y Cinema V
SAT.-"Jack," 1:30, 5:15, 9:00-"Heaven," 3:15, 7:00, 10:45
SUN.-"Jack," 1:30, 5:15, 900-"Heaven," 3:15, 7:00

FRITHJOIC)F RFPCMAN~

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan