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March 27, 1970 - Image 10

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-27

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Pige Ten

THE -MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 27, 1970

Poge Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY

LSA PROGRAM:

Waitina watchirni

Summer reading course offered during the class strife

ADIDAS SHOES
A'ROLD S FRI

By STEPHEN SHOGAN
With the bleak summer job
outlook threatening many stu-
dents, it is important to know
that the University may be able
to provide many people with an
alternative to the long, boring
hours of television reruns.
Beginning 10 years ago, the
Honors Council instituted the
Summer Reading Program which
enables qualified students to
engage in independent study for
University credit.
This independent study may
consist of any regular LSA of-
fering for which the course work
can be accomplished by read-
ing alone, and for which the
student can find a faculty spon-
sor.

The program allows the stu-
dent to sig up for classes each
spring and to work at his own
pace on readings and other
assignments given to him. be-
fore he leaves for summer break.
Within one month after his re-
turn to the University in the
fall, the student must take a
final examination.
Although students may be re-
quired to write papers, there
are no periodic quizzes and no
organized study plan. All cours-
es are taken for credit with the
grade received being recorded
on one's transcript and figured
into the grade point average.
According to Otto Graf, di-
rector of the Honors program
and this program, the major

2nd Panther freed
in INY bombing trial

NEW YORK W) - A second
Black. Panther was freed on
$100 000 bail yesterday as legal
authorities debated usina such
methods as closed-circuit tele-
vision to maintain courtroom de-
corum when pretrial hearings re-
sume for the Panthers accused
of conspiracy to murder and bomb.
State Supreme Court Justice
John Murtagh suspended the
hearings indefinitely Feb. 25 be-
cause of the uproar in his cdurt,
but he has said he would like to
start them again if order can be
assured.
Murtagh first demanded written
promises of good behavior from
each defendant, but said Wednes-
day he would accept instead writ-
ten assurance that the 13 would
do nothing to prevent their stand-
ing trial.
The Black Panther freed yester-
day was Richard Moore, 24, a
leader of the 13. He said he would
try to obtain money to free the
other Panthers, who have been held
without bail since last April 2.
They are charged with conspiring
to kill policemen and bomb public
buildings and installations.
Bail for the 13 originally was
set at from $50,000 to $100,000.
The defense has vainly argued up
to the U.S. Supreme Court that
the amounts were unreasonably
high and constituted preventive

detention - the detention of aj
person not as yet convicted of any
crime on the theory that he might
commit other crimes while at
large.
The first of the 13 to pay the
$100.000 bail was Afeni Shakur,
22. alias Alice Williams, wife of
another defendant. Loans from
E p i s c o p a 1 and Presbyterian
churches provided-her bond.
Moore's bail was furnished in
part by a local Presbyterian
church and by Abbie Hoffman,
the radical Yippie leader.
Hoffman, 31, currently is free on
$25.000 bail after his conviction
in the tumultuous Chicago con-
spiracy trial on federal charges of
inciting to riot during the 1968
Democratic National Convention.
He is one of five defendants ap-
pealing the five-year prison terms
handed down by Federal Judge
Julius Hoffman.
As at the Panther hearing here,
the Chicago trial was interrupted
repeatedly by courtroom outbursts.
As a result, all seven defendants
and their lawyers were sentenced
to jail terms for contempt-of-
court.
Gerald Lefcourt, defense at-
torney for the 13 Black Panthers,
said Moore was selected to use the
bail funds because his leadership
and public-speaking abilities will
'help raise bail for the others."

purpose of these courses is "to
enable the student to show he
can work independently.' He
believes the program fosters in-
dependence, self-discipline and
exploration into the fields of
the student's personal interest.
Last sunimer, 820 courses were
read for credit with most of
them falling in the departments
of English, history, political sci-
ence, and psychology.
The courses were taken by a
cross-section of students from
all colleges in the University
with an equal number of non-
honors and honors students tak-
ing part in the program. Each
student however, must be clear-
ed through the Honors Depart-
ment before he may sign up for
courses.
Looking towards the future,
Graf feels the program "could
expand infinitely as more and
more departments offer inde-
pendent study courses." He be-
lieves the program can be of
spe~cial benefit to students in
fulfilling some distribution re-
quirements.
Course applications. are now
available in 1210 Angell Hall
where further information may
be obtained. The deadline for
these applications is May 1,
1970. The cost of each course is
$35.00.
The University also provides
a second alternative for inde-
pendent study. This program
operates out of the corresnond-
encr study department of Ro-
bert Wilson.
The program, also providing
University credit. consists of
courses which naralll courses
nffervedin the University. These
include such things Ps econom-
ics. accounting. Envlish. geogra-
phy. history. the humanities.
Beginning in January a n e w
course dealing with environ-
mental education, will be offer-
ed.
These courses are tauoht in a"
semi-structured independent stu-
dy program. Many audio-viual
aids. taned lectures, self-tests,
self-revimws. tawnd cia ssroom
discusnions and other aids are
emnloyed and sent to the stu-
d-nt,
The courses are in nroyrens
all year and may be start-d at
any tinme' dzrin- the year. All
mat.'rials and c orrrsnnndenc's
ar, handled through the mail
end occasionally by t-lephone.

In each course, the student
works directly with a professor
or teaching fellow who has been
approved by his department
chairman. The courses run for
twelve months but may be fin-
ished as quickly as the student
progresses. However, a minimum
of eight weeks must be spent on
each course.
The fee for each course is
$27 per credit hour. However,
a student enrolled for a semes-
ter in the University and elect-
ing less than the minimum
number of hours may take a
correspondence course with no
charge.
The student would receive
full University credit for each
course but his grade would not
affect his honor point average.
The biggest drawback comes in
that a maximum of fifteen
hours credit may be used from
correspondence courses towards
a University degree.
Although designed for other
purposes, these courses can be
completed over a summer. Stu-
dents from 40 states and 10
foreign countries make use of
this plan and other offerings
from the correspondence study
department.
"Independent study is one of
the most practical alternatives
to the increased burden on the
instructor and the overcrowded
classroom," says Wilson. He
added that the courses are de-
signed for emphasis on the
learner and support by the ex-
pert.

(Continued from page 1)
merely a parade. What else
could be said?
At the LSA Bldg. the strik-
ers bunched together and pre-
vented people from entering the
building. But things dulled by
about 9 a.m., few people were
coming and the building appear-
ed to be , sealed securely.
'Maybe no one will come,"
said a masked figure. Another
replied "No that's boring."
He was only half-serious, but
he too was waiting. Wondering
if the police would be called in
and change the tenor of t h e
strike, expecting the administra-
tion's and state's response of
waiting for something new to
happen.
Mark Joliat, a student w h o
backs the BAM demands and
the strike, admitted to being
bored by the situation. He plan-
ned to return to class shortly,
convinced finals would severely
hamper the strike's effective-
ness.
The opposite view was held
by Peter Denton who express-
ed optimism for the strike and
said he anticipated little diffi-
culty locating ways - o t h e r
than classes - of closing the
University down.
A girl directing strikers to
classes agreed. "You can turn off
the lights and heating. You can
mess up the computer cards.
There are plenty of things to
do," she offered.
Joliat maintained the strike
would die, Denton that it would

grow. But both seemed to be
waiting for events that would
concretely determine its out-
come.
And who could, tell if they
would come. The situation was
eerie. The Diag was virtuallyE
empty, the center "M" strange
ly conspicuous and most every-
one you passed seemed to be
discussing the strike. Few scur-
ried and bumped against you as-
is usually the case in the early
afternoon. It was snowing and
the only sounds you heard were
feet rubbing through slush.
Prof. Jack Rothman of the soc-
ial work school has been appoint-
ed to the National Task force on
Group Life in America. The task
force is sponsored by the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee, and will
be chaired by Morris B. Abram,
president of Brandeis University.
The purpose of the group is to
develop new strategies for dealing
with intergroup conflict.
in being absolutely
sure of no feminine
offense with
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Spray for the outer
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Available also in
cleansing towelettes.

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INSURANCE CERTIFICATES
IMMEDIATELY FOR
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SPECIALIZING IN
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Lo o ntl ayments J

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UNIVERSITY OF DETROIT TOWN AND GOWN
PRESENTS
L'ONTYNE PRICE-
with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra
under the Direction of
SIXTEN EHRLING
MONDAY, APRIL 6 8:30
Ford Auditor int
TICKETS: $12.00, $10.00, $8.00, $6.00,
$4.00, $3.00
AVAILABLE AT FORD AUDITORIUM, GRINNELL'S,
J.L. HUDSON'S, U OF D STUDENT UNION

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482-9533
214 E. MICHIGAN, YPSILANTI
ARLAN'S DEPT. STORES
483-8524
234 W. MICHIGAN
DOWNTOWN YPSI.

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2456 STADIUM BLVD.
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.V. . . . . . . .

READ AND USE THE
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

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pickles and ketchup .
WI MIING^sPEEOY (ERVIC
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Feast your appetite
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Commit yourself now by contributing to the Dr. Martin Luther King,
Jr. Memorial Fund Student Campaign

DeLong's Pit Barbecue
FEATURES THESE DINNERS:

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SCHOLARSHIPS

FELLOWSHIPS

PROFESSORSHIP

Old Heidelberg
21 1-213 N. Main St. 668-9753
Specializing in German and American Food
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DANCING FRIDAY, SATURDAY, and SUNDAY
Fridav and Saturday startina 9 P.M.
Serving Complete Dinners 11 A.M.-2 A.M.

Bar-B-Q Ribs
Bar-B-Q Chicken
Bar-B-Q Beef
Bar-B-Q Pork

Shrimp
Scallops
Fried Chicken
Fried Fish

(print)

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U-M School

Street Address

Year

Fried Oysters
All Dinners Include Fries, Slaw, and Bread

SsCithity

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OPEN: Mon., Wed., Thurs., Sun.-1 1 a.m. to 2 a.m.
Fri., Sat.-1 1 a.m. to 3 a.m.

i

In support of the goals of The University of Michigan Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Me-
morial Fund, I (we) give to the University:
Amount Pledged

Iq

314 Detroit St.

665-2266

City Parking Lot in rear of Restaurant
Closed Mondays

Thet"d9ex,
Located in Scenic Northern Ann Arbor Area (Dixboro)
f / $ ** n ,.
BEST SELECTION OF SEAFOOD IN ANN ARBOR AREA

MIKE and JOE
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for
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Paid Herewith
Q semi-annual quarterly
DESIGNATION OF G

with a balance of $ __which will be remitted in Q annual
Q one payment only amounts of $ beginning
mo. yr.
IFT: Q Undesignated Scholarships/Fellowships
Q Professorship

This pledge is not to be considered as a charge against my estate.

Signature and date

When filling out this pledge form, please use your parents' address. This will be more conven-
ient for the billingoffice sinceyour own address is likely to change frequently in the next few
yea rs.
Your pledge may be paid in a number of ways over a five-year period. For example, if you de-
cide to pledge a total of $100, you might wish to pay $10 at this time and pay the balance of
$90 in semi-annual payments of $10. Or you might wish to pledge $50 with annual payments
of $10. Or you may wish to make a gift for one time only. Please remember thatryour contri-
bution and your participation in any amount are needed and will be sincerely appreciated.
The completed pledge form should be sent to:
King Memorial Fund Student Campaign
The University of Michigan
456 Michigan Union
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Make checks payable to the Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Fund.

II

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