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March 27, 1970 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-27

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Friday, March 27, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Nine

.

* DOUBLE OVERTIME:
'Diamondmen end trip with split Knjckss

lip by Bullets

Special To The Daily
TUCSON-Home runs, by Tom
Kettinger and Mike Rafferty pow-
ered the Wolverines to a 9-5 vic-
tory over the Arizona Wildcats
in the first game of a double-
header yesterday, but a seventh
inning rally in the second game
failed as the Wolverines lost 8-5.
The first game was marked not
only by Michigan's strong hitting
attack, which banged out 11 hits,
but also by the sparkling defen-
sive play of centerfielder Dan Fife
and leftfielder Kettinger, and the
brilliant relief pitching of Jim
Burton.
Michigan took the lead with two
runs in the second inning when
Bob Bowen walked and scored on
singles to left by John Hornyak
and Rafferty.
A passed ball advanced the run-
ners to second and third, and
Hornyak scored on Reggie Ball's
groundout. Michigan was never
caught from that point on, as
their lead continually eluded Ari-
zona 's grasp.
Arizona scored one in the third
on singles by Harry Lodge, Keith
BULLETIN
SALT LAKE CITY, Utah-
Michigan's Juan Bello took the
consolation event of the 500-
yard freestyle to place seventh
at the opening of the NCAA
Swimming and Diving Cham-
pionships in Salt Lake City yes-
terday. Bello's 1:55.79 could
have placed third over In-
diana's Gary Hall, who finished
at 1:55.97, had Bello qualified
for the championship race.
Southern Cal's Frank Hecki
won the event at 1:55.21, while
Michigan's Gary Kinkead fin-
ished tenth with a 1:58.37.
In the 400-yard freestyle,
UCLA's Mike Burton triumph-
ed at 4:37.29, despite a. poor
showing in the qualifying heats.

Idailly
sports
NIGHT EDITOR:
ELLIOT LEGOW
Rhodes and Jim Provenzano. The
Wildcats might have scored more
had Fife not thrown Rhodes out
on the basepaths.
It was the second man t h e
centerfielder Fife had thrown out,
the first assist coming in the first
inning.
Michigan extended its lead in
the fourth inning when, with two
out, Hornyak walked and Raf-
ferty and Ball both singled to left.
Arizona came right back with a
run in the bottom of the fourth.
Throughout the game Michigan
extended its lead, only to have
Arizona come back within a run.
The run came on three suc-
cessive singles. Not to be outdone
by Fife, rightfielder Kettinger
also threw Rhodes out trying to
advance.,
Lundstedt got his homer in the
fifth, a 400-feet shot in dead cen-
ter field. It was his second home
run of the season.
Arizona followed in the bottom
half of the inning with a run,
when Mark (Manny) Driscoll
walked, advanced on a single and
scored on an infield out.
Michigan extended its lead in
the seventh inning, with Ketting-
er's powerful shot over the 400
feet mark in left center. The two
run homer was Kettinger's first of
two. The second came in the sec-
ond game.
Arizona came right back and
scored two in the bottom half, as
Driscoll tripled, Steve Ballard sin-
gled and Rod O'Brien singled.
Starting pitcher Pete Helt was

then taken out, and Burton was
brought in. *
The Wolverine ace put out the
fire by striking out Steve Mikulic.
Michigan added three insurance
runs in the eighth on singles by
Hornyak and Rafferty, the pitch-
er's error and 'Fife's left field
single.
Burton retired the Arizona bat-
ters with almost no trouble in
the last two innings, striking out
three more Wildcats.
The second game fared differ-
ently for the Wolverines from the
very beginning, as Arizona scored
two runs in the first two innings.
Rod O'Brien drove in Driscoll
in the first with a double.
Then in the second,starting
pitcher Mickey Elwood walked
three straight Arizona batters and
was lifted by Coach Moby Bene-
dict. Reliever Mike Hilkene got
Leon Hooten to hit into a double
play, but Ray Rokey scored.
Michigan got on the scoreboard
in the fourth when Kettinger
poled a long blast at almost the
same spot as his last homer. The
Wolverine slugger now has four
homers in eight games.
Arizona added a run in the
fourth, but its greatest 'ffortr3
came in the fifth when it scored
four tallies. Two walks, two sin-
gles, an error by Hilkene and a
passed ball by Lundstedt meant
disaster for the Michigan nine.
The Wolverines had scored
three runs in the top of the in-
ning. Hilkene walked and was
driven in by Bowen's double. Fife,
Mulvihill and Rafferty were walk-
ed by Jim Morache, who was then
sent to the showers.
The Wildcats extended their
lead to four with two runs in the
sixth, setting up Michigan's un-
successful attempt at a rally in
the seventh.
After Kettinger and Bowen
walked, Rafferty reached base on
the second baseman's error, scor-
ing Kettinger. That brought the
tying run to the plate with nobody
out, but Lundstedt fanned and
Carrow and Makoski also were re-
tired.
M'inksmen
keep pace in
Miami 111v.
Special To The Daily
MIAMI - Once again, rain and
high winds played havoc with the
Miami Invitational Golf Tourna-
ment and caused a number of de-
lays in the second round action.
Although most of Michigan's golf-
ers were able to complete their
rounds, a large contigent of links-
men were caught out on the
courses when darkness fell and
will have to finish their rounds
in the morning.
As a result, only tenative infor-
mation is available on the second
round leaders.
For the team scoring, Michigan's
Wolverines stand near the top of
the 85 entries with a 614 total,
only 19 strokes behind the Hur-
ricanes of Miami, the second
round leaders. The Wolverines
came in with a 309 score yester-
day to go with their 305 total of
Wednesday.-
Captain Randy Erskine led the
way for the Wolverines with a 77
over the rugged Le Jeune C.C.
course, a score asonmatched by
Rocky Pozza. Erskine has a two
day total of 150, seven strokes be-
hind the leaders Kurt Cox of
Trinity and Wally Hadera of
Miami. Keith Mohan posted a 79
today for Michigan for a two day
total of 153. Pozza's total is 154.
Today, the Wolverines switch
back to the Biltmore C.C., which
is the easier of the two courses
that the tourney is played on.

' .M1 1" "" ti K.:16 .""i"" y'.K lY:f.V V " , .4Y
.X3tJP."."ifIN: ."}:V 1W ::115' "F tirM1lilfdiLY.'.Je.K

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK - Willis Reed, who
missed two clutch shots, and a
free throw in the first extra pe-
riod, came back with a basket
with 33 seconds remaining in the
second overtime and the New
York Knickerbockers snatched. a
120-117 victory from the Balti-
more Bullets last night in a Na-'
tional Association playoff game.
The triumph which had a capa-
city crowd of 19,500 drained from
excitement at the finish, gave the
favored Knicks a 1-0 lead in 'the
best-of-7 Eastern Division semi-
final series. The teams meet again
in Baltimore tomorrow night.
Reed's basket, the last of his
30 points, put the Knicks ahead
119-117 after . the Bullets' Earl
Monroe had missed a final sec-
ond shot in regulation time and
the Knicks failed in the final
seconds of the first overtime.
After Reed's goal, Monroe, who
scored 39 poihts, had another
chance. But he missed a jumper
and teammate Wes Unseld failed
on the rebound. Dave DeBusschere
then added New York's final
point after he was fouled with
four seconds left.
Walt Frazier, who managed on-
ly 16 points, and Dick Barnett
teamed to bring the 'Knicks back
in the first'overtime to a 110-110
tie. They trailed 110-107 when
DeBusschere hit one of two free
throws with 49 seconds left. Fra-
zier then stole the ball from Mon-
roe and Barnett picked it up and
EaPro Standings
NHL
Eastern Division

was fouled by rookie Fred Carter.
He sank the tying free throws
with 24 seconds to go.
Then Frazier once again knock-
ed the ball out of Monroe's hands
to Barnett, who raced the clock
and the Bullets down the floor
and went up for a layup with only
seconds remaining.
But Carter came from nowhere
to block the shot, infuriating the
Knicks and their fans as time
ran out.
Monroe, who hit Baltimore's
last eight points in regulation
time, had put the Bullets ahead
102-100 with 38 seconds left. But
Bill Bradley drove for a basket
12 seconds later for the dead-
lock.
Monroe dribbled away all but
one second of the remaining 24
and then missed a long jump shot
that left the game tied at 102
going into the first overtime.
The 110-107 Baltimore lead was
the largest in the first extra ses-
sion, but the Knicks pulled ahead
115-110 in the second and still
led 117-112 with three minutes
to go. But Kevin Loughery, Mon-
roe and finally Carter, with 52
seconds to play, pulled the Bullets
even at 117.
DeBusschere finished with 22
points and hauled in 24 rebounds
for the Knicks, who had beaten
the Bullets 10 times in their last
11 meetings and eliminated them
in four straight contests in last
year's semifinal playoff. Reed
grabbed 21 rebounds.
Carter scored 21 and Unseld
snared 31 rebounds for Baltimore.
Wings topped
DETROIT -Rookie goalie Tony
Esposito set a modern National
Hockey League record last night
when he registered his 14th shut-
out of the season while back-
stoping the Chicago Black Hawks
to a 1-0 victory over the Detroit
Red Wings.
PAUL CAMELET
DEAN TAILOR
for Men and Women
alterations and remodeler, also
specialties in shortening ladies
coats, slacks, and skirts.
No longer with Camelet Bros. a
in business for himself
1103 S. University
above the drug store
663-4381

Pit Martin broke up an out-
standing duel between Esposito
and Detroit goalie Roy Edwards
when he backhanded his own re-
bound into the net at 10:15 of the
final period for his- 26th goal.
Martin broke in alone on right
wing from the blue line and Ed-
wards moved out to block his in-
itial shot but Martin sped on by
and had just enough room to
backhand the rebound.
The victory lifted the Hawks
just one point from East Divi-
sion leader Boston in the red hot
NHL race with only five games to
play for each team.
Detroit, which has six games
to play remained in fourth place
two points ahead of New York
which lad most of the season be-
fore skidding in the last month.
Esposito made 35 saves in es-
tablishing the modern shutout
record.
He was tied with former To-
ronto goalie Harry Lumley who
had 13 shutouts in 1953-54. The
all time record is 22 set by Mon-
treal's George Hainsworth in 1928-
29 in a 44 game season.
Esposito made his toughest save
in the first period on left wing
Frank Mahovlich on a power play.
We Want You To Join Our Church
As An

A
®

-Associated Press
WES UNSELD (41) wears the look of incredulity as the ball
bounces away during last night's game between the Baltimore
Bullets and the New York Knicks. The Knicks won the NBA play-
off game, 120-117.
Hot and Cold

Carrow 3b
Fife cf
Lundstedt c
Kettinger If
Bower lb
Sullivan lb
Hornyak rf
Rafferty ss
Ball 2b
Helt p
Burton p

MICHIGAN
AB
4
4
4
4
3
1
3
4
5
3
1
Totals 37
ARIZONA

R
0
2
1
1
0
2
1
1
0
1
9

H
2.
1
1
0
a
2
'3
2
Q
0
11

BI
1
2
0
a
0
1
2
0
4
8

I

Je4j teie
A. LEE KIRK,

AB R H BI
Driscoll 2b 2 2 2 0
Ballard ss 5 1 3 1
O'Brien lb 5 0 2 2
Mikulic rf 2 1 0 0
Prest rf 2 0 0 0
Rokey c 4 0 1 0
Williams 3b 4 0 2 0
Lodgeif 4 1 1 0
Rhodes cf 4 0 2 1
Provenzano p 2 0 1 1
Benson ph 1 0 0 0
O'Hara p 0 0 0 0
Anderson ph 1 0 0 0
Totals 35 5 14 5
R H E
MICHIGAN 920 110 239-9 11 3
Arizona 991 110 20- 5 14 2
ip h r er bb sc
Helt (W, 1-1) 6% 11 5 4 2 3
Burton 21,E 3 0 0 1 4
Provenzano 7 8 6 5 3 11
O'Hara 2 3 3 2 2 1
WP -- Provenzano. PB - Rokey 2.
HBP ,- Rafferty by O'Hara, Kettinger
by Provenzano. T - 2:40.

Bower, rf, I
Fife cf
Kettinger If
Mulvihill c
Buss pr
Rafferty ss
Sullivan Ib
Lundstedt c
Mogue 1b
Ball 2b
Makoski ph
Elwood p
Hilkene p
Lanthorne p
Driscoll 2b
Ballard ss
O'Brien lb
Williams 3b
Glenn If
Prest of
Rokey c
Lodge cf, rf
Rhodes rf,
Hooten p
Morache p
Dierks ph
Berger p
O'Hara p
MICHIGAN
Arizona
Elwood
Kilkene
Lanthorne

(Second Game)
MICHIGAN
AB R H
lb2 1 1
3 1 0
f 3 2 1
2 0 0
0 0 0
3 0 1
2 0 0
1 0 0
2 0 1
3 0 1
1 0 0
9 90 9
1 1 0
S 1 0 0
Totals 26 5 5
ARIZONA
3 1 2
2 0 0
3 1 1
3 0 1
1 1 0
1 0 0
'2 2 2
3 1 1
If 3 1 1
1 9
2 0 0
0 1 0
0 0
0 900
Totals 22 8 8
R H
000 103 1- 5 5
110 142 x-- 8 8
ip h r er bb
1 1 2 23
3% 6 5 4 1
1% 1 1 1 2

IP
1
0
0
1
I
9
0
1
0
0
'I
U
L
6
,4

Boston
Chicago
Montreal
Detroit
New York
Toronto
St. Louis
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Oakland
Minnesota
Los Angeles

Western Division
35 26 10
24 36 11
17 30 24
20 38 13
15 34 22
11 50 10

30
59
58
53
52
32

211
169
193
156
203
154

168
223
214
226
247
276

W L T Pt. GF GA
38 16 17 93 260 2001
42 21 8 91 239 1611
37 19 15 89 233 179
37 10 13 87 219 177;
35 21 15 85 228 175
29 29 12 70 215 224

Ordained Minister
And Have The Rank Of
Doctor of Divinity
We are a non-structured faith, un-
demonational with no traditional
doctrine or dogma. Our fast growing
church is actively seeking new min-
isters who believe what we believe;
All men are entitled td their own
convictions; To seek truth their own
way, whatever it may be, no ques-
tions asked. As a minister of the
church, you may:
1. Start your own church and ap-
ply for exemption from property
and other taxes. I
2. Perform marriages, baptism, fu-
nerals, and all other ministerial
functions.,
3. Enjoy reduced rates from some
modes of transportation, some
theaters, stores, hotels, etc.
4. Seek draft exemption as one of
our working missionaries. We
will tell you how.
Enclose a free will donation for the
Minister's credentials and license.
We will also issue Doctor of Divinity
Degree. We are State Chartered and
your ordination is recognized in al
50 states and most foreign countries.
FREE LIFE CHURCH - BOX, 4039,
HOLLYWOOD, FLORIDA 33023.

The fnal gust .. .
of a once poud storm
HEADLINES DO indeed flow in and out like the tide, and it is
the confrontation and not the resolution that makes the
news. Sometimes a story long sunk beneath the waves and cur-
rents will resurface, but more often than not, it reappears only
as a shadow of its former self.
Two such specs of news came over the AP Sports Wire
yesterday.
The suit brought by the Wyoming 14, fourteen black players
booted off the Wyoming football team this past season for
wearing black armbands, was dismissed yesterday by a Cheyenne
judge.
And in Bloomington, Indiana Coach John Pont cancelled
spring practice invitations of three black players who boy-,
cotted practices, last fall. The three blacks, including halfback
and sprint champion Larry Highbaugh, had expressed doubts
about their future commitment to the Indiana football pro-
gram in an interview published in the Indianapolis Star this
past Sunday.
The Wyoming judge dismissed the 1 million dollar suit
because the damage claim "was insubstantial and totally
speculative." He also ruled that the suit in effect was a
suit against the state of Wyoming, and the state had not
given its consent to be sued
The Wyoming 14's suit realy never had a chance. The play-
ers were dismissed for wearing black armbands to support a
protest against Brigham Young University in violation of a
ule instituted by Wyoming coach Lloyd Eaton. It was the
coach who kicked the players off the team, and there are no
legal bounds to limit a university coach's disciplinary powers.
" The suit was dismissed from a lower court for this reason, with
the judge ruling that such disciplinary actions were the peroga-
tive of the coach.
Suits such as the one brought by the Wyoming 14 will fall
on deaf judicial ears so long as there' is no legal precedent
limiting the disciplinary powers held by coaches to actions
directly related to the football team.
The power that allows a coach to rule his players
minds off the field with the same power he exercises over
their minds and bodies on the field is an abhorrent one, but
one the vast majority of coaches use prudently. But until
there is some legal safeguard to protect players the power is
there to be used unwisely as well as wisely.
The issues at Indiana are far less clear cut. To many,
including Pont, they are invisible. In his eyes, the blacks' boycott
of practice last fall to protest discrimination and dramatize a
list of grievances was a violation of the rules, and the penal-
ties for violation of the rules were clearly spelled out; dis-
missal.
To the blacks, the issues were equally as clear cut. They
felt discrimination. They resented being on the outside.
They discussed these problems in the Indianapolis Star
article. They had doubts that the conditions that led them to
boycott would be changed this spring, and they expressed their
odubts in the interview. They discussed the possibility of quitting,
the team if things did not change.
Pont, contending that "there has to be an honest conviction
and sincerity on the part of all persons in any program such as
football," felt that the three players who spoke out in the inter-
view had expressed a lack of conviction sufficient to justify
their exclusion from the team.
It is "painfully easy to see why Pont and the three black
players feel as they do. Painful, because even the small gap that
seemingly exists between the two will not be easily crossed.
Sometimes it takes a mighty span to bridge a small gulf.
.yrrv"&#.. ,- ,-:% # r"::" ::x""::": #2 22:v" ":" : ea ::,r: . a g : a;"x

Yesterday's Results
Chicago 1, Detroit 0
Philadelphia at Los Angeles, inc.
Today's Games
St. Louis at Oakland
ABA
Eastern Division
W L Pct.4
Indiana 18 19 .740
Kentucky 39 34 .534
Carolina 37 36 .5071
New York 35 39 .473
Pittsburgh 24 50 .324:
Miami 20 54 .270
Western Division
Denver 43 32 .573
Washington 42 33 .560
Dallas 39 36 .520
Los Angeles 38 37 .507
New Orleans 36 37 .493
Yesterday's Results
No games scheduled.
Today's Games
Indiana at Pittsburgh
Miami vs. Carolina at Greensboro,
N.C.
Washington at Los Angeles
New Orleans at Denver

GB
15
17
19%
30%
34%
1
4
5

I

J

r

TIED WITH IOWA:
Mat team rises to fifth

TV RENTALS'
FREE Service and Delivery
---NO DEPOSIT REQUIRED---
CALL:
Nejac TV Itentals
662-5671
SERViNG BIG IO SCHOOLS SINCE 1961

Special To The Daily
EVANSTON, Ill. - The Mich-
igan wrestling team stands tied
f or fifth place through the pre-
liminary bouts of the NCAA
wrestling tournament which be-
gan yesterday afternoon at North-
western.
Iowa State's Dan Gable pinned
all three of his opponents to help
the Cyclone squad to a three point
lead over Oregon State. Iowa State
had 28, Oregon State 25, Mich-
igan State, 22, Oklahoma State
21, Iowa and Michigan 14, Okla-
homa 13, Penn State 12, and
Washington and Navy 11, beforb

the quarterfinals to be held today.
Seven of Michigan's eight en-
tered grapplers remain in conten-
tion for the quarterfinal8. Jerry
Hoddy at 118, and Jesse Rawls at
167 won all their matches goin6
into the quarterfinals.'
Tim Cech at 126, Mark King at
142, Lane Headrick at 150, Tom
Quinn at 158, and Rick Bolhouse
at heavyweight lost matches, but
have the opportunity to wrestle
back. Therlon Harris, wrestling at
177, was ousted by a referee's
overtime decision which went
against him.

I F
'-

r

M

I1

If you think
youre getting a great
shave with a razor blade,

Scores

;

MEN STUDENTS!.
About ten more men wanted for French Co-
op in Oxford Housing next year.
KEEP UP YOUR FRENCH
GOOD FOOD
GOOD TALK
GOOD COMPANY
APPLY AT ONCE AT EMMANUEL HOUSE,
764-2147 OR OXFORD HOUSING

EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Baltimore 8, Washington 2
Seattle 2, Cleveland 1
Chicago, N 9, Oakland 2
California 6, San Diego 3
Atlanta vs New York, cancelled, rain
Cincinnati vs Philadelphia, cancelled,
rain.
Los Angeles vs Montreal, cancelled.
rain.
New York, N vs Kansas City, cancel-
led, rain..
Pittsburgh vs. Chicago, A, cancelled.
rain.
St. Louis vs Detroit, cancelled, rain.
Boston vs Minnesota, cancelled, rain.

I

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a good, close shave on the easy
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Like your cheeks. Because
your cheeks are almost flat,
like a razor blade.-
But what about the hard-
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Feel how your beard grows
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feel your f~a
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(ln independent tests, the
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The hard thing about shaving
your upper lip with a razor
blade is shaving close enough.
Again, the unique Norelco
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N.

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Feel your sideburns
The biggest problem with
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them straight, and even on
both sides.
The Norelco Tripleheader
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U

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