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March 25, 1970 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-25

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Wednesday, March 25, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Prm <:ev

...

rage Seven

'Batsmeu

crush

Wildcats,

12-4

Linksmen fly to Miami tourney
to compete with 85 other teams

Special To The Daily
TUCSON, Ariz. -Michigan ex-
oloded for 12 runs in the first
four innings, and Jim Burton
scattered eight hits, as the Wol-
verines clobbered the Arizona
Wildcats 12-4 yesterday.
Michigan banged, out 16 hits,
15 of them in the first four frames,
against seven ' Arizona pitchers.
Burton went the distance for the
*Wolverines. f
The Wolverines stunned the
Wildcats with six hits in the first
inning, and Arizona starter Bob
Hooten was out of the game al-
most befoie he was in it.
FIVE HITS, including, a triple
by Tom Lundstedt and a bases
loaded double by Mike Rafferty,
one of two two-baggers he had in
the game, aided the Wolverines.
as did three Wildcat errors and a
passed ball. Hooten committed two

of the errors to add to his misery.
The Michigan attack rested in
the second, but came back to life
in the third with three runs on
five hits. The Wildcats committed
two more fielding miscues.
After beating out a hit to the
pitcher, Mike Bowen was thrown,
out at the plate on Rafferty's sec-
ond double of the day. Rafferty
scored on Reggie Ball's single to
second center, and singles by Mark
Carrow and Dan Fife drove in the
other two runs.
THE FOURTH INNING saw
three more Wolverine runs, five
more Wolverine hits, but, strange-,
ly, no Wildcat errors.
Tom Kettinger's single, Bob Ma-
koski's double to left, and singles
by Bowen and Rafferty, along
with Ball's infield out, accounted
for the runs.
Arizona first scored in the sixth

daily
sports
NIGHT EDITOR.:
JERRY CLAtKE
on a two run homer by Ed Benson,
the lone round-tripper of the
game.
Burton, who was a little wild
with seven walks, allowed Ari-
zona's other two runs in the ninth.
Three bases on balls, and a wild
pitch scored Manny Driscoll, and
a passed ball by Lundstedt let in
Roy Gump with the Wildcats'
final tally.
Aiding the Wolverine attack yes-
terday was speed, as Carrow, Raf-,
ferty and Bowen beat out infield
hits, and Carrow stole a base.
The biggest 'of the big Wolverine
bats belonged to Rafferty. A left-
handed hitter, Rafferty sprayed
hits around the field, with a
double to left-center, a double to
right and an infield hit to t h e
second baseman.
BURTON, the ace of Michigan's
staff, struck out 10, while walk-
ing seven, and allowed t h r e e
earned runs in bringing his won-
lost record to 1-1.
The victory was the Wolverine's;
first in five starts. It snapped the
Arizona winning streak at five and
brought the Wildcat -record down
to 16-5.
The two teams go at it herea
again today.

Wildcat woes

By JIM KEVRA trip, three are seniors, (captain
Seeking to round their games Randy Erskine, Rocky Pozza, andI
into shape before the Big Ten Bill Lyle) two are juniors, (John
season starts, seven members of Roska and Mohan), and two art
the University of Michigan golf sophomores (Gary B a lI Ii e t and
team headed south last Friday for Pete Clark).
their first tournament of the year. The tournament is scored on
the prestigeous M i a in i Invita- team, not individual competition.
tional. The tournament which Each. day. each team has the op-I
starts today and runs through tion of entering four to six players
Saturday, pits 572 golfers from 85 with the four best scores of theI
schools in team competition. day being counted. The same four
The tournament will be par- players scores do not have to count
ticularly tough for the Wolvtrines each day, however. Because of
because the majority of the teams the large number of competitors.
entered are from the South and the tourney will be played on two
have been able to practice all courses, The Biltmore C.C. and{
winter. In contrast, Michigan's the Le Jeune C.C. Teams will play
linksmen have had to be content each course on alternate days.
to hit off of the practice mats Coach Newcomb emphasized that
inside the golf course clubhouse the Wolverines chief competition
and to practice on the course only wil come from Florida, Florida
when the weather allows. d -.d
Despite these hardships, Head
Coach Bill Newcomb explained.
that he is expecting a good per-
formance out of his team since
they have played exceptionally STUfDENT PO
well in their pracitice sessions
down in Florida.
Yesterday, for example, the
Michigan golf team was victorious rp ng lea
in three hastily arranged dual SpigCe
meets as they conquered the Uni- AII0
versity of Miami (Fla.), Baldwin-
Wallace, and the University of the
South. Keith Mohan was medalist
for the team with a 73. The Wol-
verines other four competitors
shot 74, 74, 75, and 75 which
prompted Newcomb to comment,
"Our scores are real good and, if Gr t
we keep this up we could possibly
win the tojirnament."
Michigan enters the tournament ou$ands of bc
with a very experienced team. Of
the seven players who made the

State, and Jacksonville. Florida
boasts the best amateur player in
the world, the current U.S. Arna-
teur champion, Steve Melnyk.
Melnyk won the title at the short
but extremely difficult Oakmont
Country Club in Pittsburgh 1 a s t
June with four rounds of 70-73-73-
70.
The University of Houston, pro-
claimed by almost everyone as the
best golf school in the country, is
not competing in the meet.
After this week's tournament,
the team heads back to Ann Ar-
bor for two more weeks of prac-
tice, then has another pre-Big Ten
mneet in Columbus, Ohio, the Kep-
ler Invitational. Finally, on April
18th the Big Tden season com-
mences with the Illinois Invita-
tional at Champaign.
)OK SGR\/CGI

Carrow 3
Fife cf
Lundsted
Kettinger
Makoski
Bowen rf
Rafferty
Ball 2b
Burton p"
Driscoll 1
Mikulic If
Gump If
O'BrienX
Rokey c
Lodge of
Rhodes C
Jacome ss
Anderson
Ballard 3
Benson rf
Hooten p

MICHIGAN
AB
b 4 .
5t
t 5
r if 4
lb 4
f 5
ss 5
4
k' 5
i Totals 41
ARIZONA
AB
2b 4
f 3
1
b 4
-4
3
;f 2
s 2
3b N 3
b,- ss 3
f' 3
p 0

R
2
0
1
2
2
2,
2
1
0
12
R
1
0'
1
0
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0

H
2
1
I
3
2
3
1
0
16
H
1
0
0
1
0
1
0
2
2
0

BI
RI
1'
0E
1
2
9
BI
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
0

Cary p 1 0 0 0
Cole p 0 0 0 01
Bauman ph 0 0 0 0j
Shields p 0 0 0 0
Prest ph 1 0 0 0
Formiller p 0 0 0 0
Campos ph 1 0 0 0
Berger p 0 0 0 0'
Gray p 0 0 0 0
Totals 35 4 t 8 3
E - Rokey, Ballard, Benson, Hooten,
Cary. LOB - Michigan 9, Arizona 11.
2B - Rafferty 2, Makoski. 3B - Lund-
stedt. HR - Benson. SB - Carrow.
Michigan 603 300 000-12 16 0
Arizona 000 002 002- 4 8 5
J.p h r er bbso,
Burton , (, 1-1) 9 8 4 3 7 10
Hooten (L, 4-2) %2 5 6 3 0 1
Cary 2%/ 6 3 2 1 2
Cole . * 13 4 3 3 0 1
Shields 2 1 0 0 1 2
Formiller 2 0 0 0 2 2
Berger % 1 0 0 1 2
Gray l3 0 0 0 0 0

:rance Sale
Week

-Associated Press
CAZZIE RUSSELL, former Michigan basketball star now with
the New York Knicks, shines his shoes as he prepares to go on
National Guard duty in New York. Russell's call-up is due to
the current postal strike, as the Guard prepares to move the mail.
MVP TO DEEKS
Gamsby new captain

THING
uced n Price
)oks from 5c up!

-Pilots given ok to sell

SEATTLE () -Federal bank-
ruptcy referee Sidney Volinn will
sign an order today lifting all re-
straints to sell the sell the Seattle
Pilots to a Milwaukee group so he
'can decide on the merits of. that
sale at a hearing March 30, spe-
cial Washington Asst. Atty. Gen
William Dwyer said yesterday.
Dwyer's explanation came after
Volinn continued the case of the
financially - troubled Pilots until
today at 10 a.m.
Volinn said during a hearing
marked by passionate statements
by botl sdes that his primary
concern .was with the Pilots or-
ganization, which had, put itself
in his hands under Chapter 11 of
the Federal Bankruptcy Act.
He said it was "'incumbent on
this court to keep open for con-
sideration the offer of the Mil-
waukee group, which comes before
us March 30."
Volinn said that while various
arguments were put forth to keep
the club in Seattle, nobody had
come forward with a plan to save
it financially.
The Milwaukee group, mean-
while, already has entered into an
agreement to buy the club f o r
$10.8 million.
The deal would be closeable on
April 30 and would offer means
for Pacific Northwest Sports, Inc.,
owner-of the Pilots to pay its cre-
ditors. ,
"Every way we turn around,"
Volinn said, "we have an assured
$10.8 million offer from Milwau-
kee. If we don't take that, we
have nothing."
Volinn stressed that he was not
saying he would approve sale of
the club to Milwaukee. He said his

primary responsibility in this case
was to Pacific Northwest Sports,
and that he had to be free of other
court entanglements to decide
what would be best for the Pilots
and the creditors.
Alfred Schweppe, the Seattle
lawyer whose injunctions and re-
tainers stopped the American
League from approving sale of the
franchise, said about the situation:
' "The solution is to make the
American League honest." -
He said the league should be
made to fulfill its commitments
concerning financing the team
during the 1970 season.
Dwyer said Volinn's action
would not affect the various dam-
age suits against the American
League and the Pilots. Those suits
total more than $82' million,. He
did concede, however, that the
Pilots apparently were Milwaukee-
bound unless someone came for-.
ward with at least as good an offer
before a move.
That seemed highly unlikely.
Earlier, the secretary-treasurer of
the Pilots testified that the club
is losing $12,500 a day and is in
a "catastrophic" financial situ-
ation.
Max Soriano, who owns nearly
one-third of the stock in the year-
old American League team, told
Volinn, "It has been apparent for
several months we would be unable
to operate without the infusion of
new monies."
He said that at a conservative
estimate it would require $4.3 mil-
lion to carry the Pilots through
next Feb. 28, taking into account
a projected cash loss of $1.55 mil-
lion for the 1970 season.
Soriano was the first witness as

the legal battle over the Pilots
shifted to federal court. Many of
the figures he cited had been
brought out earlier in the day in
King County Superior Court by
the club's controller.
The hearing before Volinn re-
quired 'Washington state and
Seattle to show cause why they
should not be enjoined from inter-
fering with the sale of the Pilots
to Milwaukee at the agreed price
of $10.8 million.
It was scheduled after Pacific
Northwest Sports Inc., owner of'
the Pilots, filed a petition in V.S.
District Court last week asking it
to order the sale under provisions
of the Bankruptcy Act. 'Volinn
was assigned to hear the matter
Soriano said the corporation
now has $91,000 in the bank, has
a normal overhead of $250,000 a
month, but ,the overhead at this
time is $350,000 a month because
of spring training.

The Dekers Organization held
their annual dinner at the' Town
Club last night honoring the 1969-
70 edition of the Wolverine
hockey team.
Awards were given while Paul
Gamsby, a junior from Sudbury,
Ontario, was named Michigan
captain for the 1970-71 season.
Gamsby, a chippy player but a
team leader will take on just
about anybody. Gamsby finished
the league scoring race with nine
goals and 16 assists. Gamsby also
had 20 penalties serving 46 min-
utes.
THE DEKERS Organization also
chose Bernie Gagnon as the most
Colorful Rookie. Gagnon led the
team in scoring as a sophomore
and is already a top pro prospect.
In the NHL draft St. Louis took
Gagnon as their number two pick
and it looks like Gagnon may join
former Wolverine hockey star Red

Berenson with the- Blues when he
graduates.
The Most Valuable Player,
chosen by the players, was award-
ed to graduating senior Don Deeks.
Deeks who has always played well
at center, came on in scoring this
year with 11 goals and 15 assists.
THE MOST Improved Player,
chosen by Coach Al Renfrew, was
given to Jerry Lefebvre, a ,soph-
omore from North Bay, Ontario.
Lefebvre moved into the regular
lineup when Punch Cartier was
handed a one-game suspension
during one of his frequent fisti-
cuffs.

RUN FOR THE SUN
FROM APRIL 29 TO MAY 6
and stay in
ACAPULO or the BAHAMAS

either one is ONLY $189
and includes

GeG'
Ge cePra
WOI
DI1A MO ND
29 . University 663-715

'

11

Sandier Loves Iide Open Spaces.Goes
all the way to Italy just to get them. Airy woven leather plus t-strap, sling
back and stacked heel make for a pretty breeze of a sandal. But then, Sandler

7 days and nights on
the beach at the Hotel

" :dw}~~a. ' 4S f~ } . a. t4r v r.v::.. v w

Ea
Boston
Chicago
Detroit
Montreal
New York
Toronto
We
xSt. Louis

Professional Standings N Acapulco.
N H L Western Division
ast Division Denver 4g 32 .573 - A
W L T Pt. GF GA Washington 41 33 .554 1% A weC
37 16 17 91 257 199 Dallas 39 36 .520 4
41 21 8 90 228 161 Los Angeles 38 36 .514 4Y rtv
37 19 13 87 219 176 New Orleans 36 37 .493 6J
36 19 15 87 228 177 x-Clinched division title.
35 20 15 85 227 172
29 28 12 70 213 219 Yesterday's Re~ults
S 8 1s 70212 Carolina 127, Miami 1121 Moonlight
alias 133, Pittsburgh 105

7 days and nights at the
Freeport Inn
Free h ap py hours with
rock .bands every night.
Free services to beach-

I

of Boston and the Italians are pretty breezy people.

ie in cocktail

$18oo

BEIGE or WHITE

17 Nickels Arcade

cruise includ-
parties, floor

Ies and casinos.

11

I

.:.

Pittsburgh 23 36 115
O Philadelphia 17 29 24
Minnesota 15 33 21
Oakland 19 38 12
Los Angeles 11 49 10
x--Clinched division title
Yesterday's Results
Oakland 2, Minnesota 2, tie
St. Louis at Los Angeles, inc.
Today's Games
Toronto at Montreal
Boston at New York
Philadelphia at Oakland
Minnesota at Pittsburgh
ABA
Eastern Division

57 167 223
58 191 211
52 203 245
51 153 224
32 154 2721

Today's Games
Carolina at Indiana
Pittsburgh at Kentucky
Washington at Los Angeles
NBA PLAYOFFS
Today's Games
Eastern Division Semifinals
Philadelphia vs. Milwaukee at Madi-
son, Wis., 1st game of best-of-7
series.
Western Division'Semifinals
Chicago at Atlanta, 1st game of best-
of-7 series
Phoenix at Los Angeles, 1st game of
best-of-7 series
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Los Angeles 13, Chicago A 4,
Minnesota 4, Cincinnati 0
Pittsburgh 7, St. Louis 3
Washington 8, Kansas City 0
Boston 4 Houston 3
Baltimore 6, Montreal 1
New York N 4, New York A 1
Philadelphia 5, Detroit 0
Cleveland 10, Chicago N S
San Diego15, Oakland 6
California 2, Seattle 1

ing treeI

shows, sail ing, swim-
ming, riding, fishing.

Scuba diving, snorkling,
fishing

or, just get away from it all.
(either place has miles of beach)
Along with your jet airfare and baggage handling,
you get the vacation of a lifetime.

xlndiana
Kentucky
Carolina
* l
mew York
Pittsburgh
Miami

54'
36
35
24
20

L
18
34
36
39
49
54

Pct.
.750
.528
.500
.473
.329
.270

GB
16
18
20
30%
35

. - , --.-....... .. ... . n ......., ....... ...... ..... r..... 1 .... v.,.- .., ::> r...........-...-....... i:v..
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Center for Russian and East European Studies
presents a lecture by
Sir Iscaah BIlerlin.1
President, Wolfson College
Oxford, England
... onf
"The Obsession of Russians With istoriCism
IngThe Nineteenhand Twentt Cenuis

for information BARRY BOYER, 761-6359
STUDENT TOURS - 886-0822
Reservations

Daily Official Bulleti t
(Continued from Page 2)
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE
212 SAB, Lower Level
.MARCH 25:
Amer. Friends Serv. Committee, vol-
unteer summer prog. in community
service and peace work in U.S., work
in camps in Latin Amer., overseas.
MARCH#26.
Camp Tamarack, Fresh Air Soc., Det.,
couns, spec. in wtrfrnt., arts & crafts,
nature-camp"raft tripping, dramatics.
dance, music, unit and asst unit supv.,
;casewnrorer rk-bus drivears noun,, for4n

I

I

i,
i
''
ii

THE ANN.

ARBOR TENANTS UNION
endorses
SON and STEVE NISSEN

JOE GOLDEN

III

I

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