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March 25, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-25

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PETITIONING FOR MEMBERShIP
CALL 761-1294 or 769-0437 before Mon.,
March 30, for Appointment
"If you don't work, you don't eat"

page three

im4c

Sitiigian

3atly

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

Wednesday, March 25, 1970.

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

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I

GRADUATE ASSEMBLY
MEETING
TONIGHT
7:30
WEST CONFERENCE ROOM
RAG KHAM
MEMBERS, VISITORS, OTHERS
ARE WELCOME

The SGi
By RICK PERLOFF
The candidates for president of
Student Government Council main-
tain that SGC is relatively impotent,
but believe Council can enhance its
power and influence with the admin-
istration by amplifying its efforts to
educate students.
While the three candidates differ
on the extent they favor working with
the administration, they generally
agree that SGC provides an import-
ant forum for promoting their views.
The candidates agree that this
"sounding board" function has been
filled by other ad hoc groups, but they
still see it as an important part of
their job. And they admit that ex-
panding SGC's r o 1 e - building a

broader base of student support - is
difficult to accomplish.
"We see SGC as a platform from
which we can speak to the campus on
important issues," explains Joe Gold-
enson. Goldenson admits that other
groups may be pressing the adminis-
tration for the same changes as SGC
and adds that this may detract from
his role as president. But "the more
groups you have pushing for change
the more effective it is."
In addition, he believes that SGC
has a different - less radical - con-
stituency than a group like SS. He
says that by virtue of its institutional
position as representative of student
government, it has a built-in author-
ity which other groups don't have.

He recognizes that groups o t h e r
than SGC organized many of the ac-
tions on campus - such as the LSA
Bldg. take-over and the drive to in-
crease black admissions. But SGC can
help, he says. "It's another group of
people who have a lot of funds and
resources."
More skeptical about the effective-
ness of SGC, Bruce Wilson believes
Council's main function is to lend its
support to other campus groups or-
ganizing political actions.
"I don't think Council can add any
inspiration at all. SGC can add a lit-
tle stability and permanence in terms
of being able to continually help press
things." Wilson adds that if president,

C

president: Glory and

no

he would substantially increase SGC's
efforts to seek out students.
While Wilson stresses SGC's sup-
portive role, he says 'it must be am-
plified by education campaigns - he
suggests Council sponsor more talks
individually with students to increase
their awareness.
Marty Scott has the most optimistic
view of SGC. "If SGC can become a
group that is continually working to-
ward student-related demands and
continually working toward campus
issues, it can generate a lot of re-
spect," he says.
Scott seems more willing to work
with the administration through es-
tablished committees than Golden-
son.

ipower?
"I don't see why by definition the
president of Student Government
Council and the president of the Uni-
versity have to be enemies. I don't
mean bowing down to him; I think
you can set up a relationship that's
not hostile."
Believing SGC has a duty to make
students more aware of the campus
problems, Scott suggests creating
committees through which non-SOC
members can work.
But he has lingering doubts about
SGC's effectiveness too.
"It may very well be true," he says,
"that there is nothing that can be
done to make Council an effective
force. We're trying to explore the pos.
sibility that this isn't so."

IL

11

HELD . i~u I~oil
OVER! *aW!1 8-641
NOMINATED FOR
5 ACADEMY AWARDS INCLUDING
Best Picture

[16

the Ixon
n e ws to da
by The Associated Press and College Press Service on
E

to it government
against. segregation

Tues. at
6:45
and 9,05

Wed. at
1:15-3:45
6:15-8:45

"THE LAST WORD IN THRILLERS,
TERRIFIC!"
-GENE SHALIT, Look Magazine

BACH CLUB
PRESENTS
ANOTHER FANTASTIC PROGRAM!!
Live Performance of Randolph Smith's
SONATA MOVEMENT IN B MINOR
GINA ERDREICH, Flute
RUTH BURTON, Violin
PHIL ZARET, Cello
with short, ILLUMINATING remarks (with musical
illustration) by Randolph Smith (Bach Club Pres.
and Founder) on:
0 What Makes a Piece a Piece
0 How to Write Music
0 How to Plagiarize Music
* Bach's Musical Offering
ABSOLUTELY NO MUSICAL KNOWLEDGE IS NEEDED
TO UNDERSTAND THE REMARKS
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 25-8 P.M.
1236 Washtenaw at Forest (near S. Univ.)
EVERYBODY WELCOME! Refreshments and Fun
afterwards. 663-2827, 761-7356, 764-9887

PRINCE, NORDOM SIHANOUK called on his supporters in
Cambodia to rise up and wage guerrilla warfare against the regime
that overthrew him as chief of state, Radio Peking announced
yesterday.
The statement was coupled with his announcement that he was
setting up a government in exile in Peking and organizing a "libera-
tion army" to fight his way back to'power.
A Laotian Communist envoy said yesterday his forces will sup-
port Sihanouk if he continues his struggle "to topple the United
States," Kyodo News Service 'reported from Vientiane.
The Hanoi radio said yesterday that North Vietnam would also
support Sihanouk against the new Cambodian government.
In Cambodia newspapers called for an end to the Cambodian
monarchy and the creation of a republic with a president as chief
of state.
SOME_ OF THE SOLDIERS alleged to have perpetuated the
My Lai massacre smoked marijuana the night before their unit
went into action, a former sergeant testified yesterday.
Sergeant Charles West told a senate investigating panel that at
least 60 per cent of the members of the infantry regiment whieh
allegedly carried out the massacre, had smoked marijuana at least
once and that many members ofAhe 800-man regiment were chronic
users of marijuana.
Sen. Thomas Dodd, (D-Conn), chairman of the juvenile delin-
quency subcommittee has repeatedly said he feels there is a link be-
tween the use of marijuana and the My Lai massacre.
FOUR UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN STUDENTS were ar-
rested yesterday morning as they picketed during the eighth day
of a strike over teaching assistant contracts.
The students were charged with disorderly conduct after, they
prevented a truck from moving in the campus area.
A ,Madison court is expected today to rule on the university's
request for an injunction to halt the strike which has cut class at-
tendance by nearly 75 per cent. Although there has been no official
statement, sources say the teaching assistants plan to violate the
injunction if it is granted and continue the, strike.
THE MICHIGAN HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES h a s
passed and sent to the Senate a bill proposing a two-stage, 35-cent
increase in the state's present $1.25 hourly minimum wage.
Under the bill, passed 88-15 yesterday afternoon, the minimum
wage would rise to $1.45 on July 1, then to $1.60 on Jan. 1, 1971.
House approval of the bill followed a more than 11/2 hour caucus
by House Republicans.
IDAHO FARMERS destroyed two million pounds of potatoes
yesterday morning in the biggest demonstration during their
month-long campaign for higher potato prices.
This brings on an estimated 14 million pounds of the number
of potatoes destroyed since the National Farmers Organization de-
clared a holdout action Feb. 21 to raise the prices of potatoes.

Protesters against pollution
Oil pollution protesters demonstrate outside the company's offices in New Orleans Monday after-
noon. The group was protesting pollution in the Gulf of Mexico from a Chevron rig that has been
blowing wild for the past several weeks.
PRISONER TREATMEl\TT:
HAP dfd' h g
arve a en s atrcouttin

Asks funds to
uplift' schoo' Is'
WASHINGTON (M -- Presi-
dent Nixon said yesterday he
will sharply limit the types of
{ s c h o o l segregation he will
act against.
In a statement issued from the
Nhite House, Nixon instead pro-
posed spending $1.5 billion over
two years for educational uplift.in
black and other minority schools.
Nixon also said
-He will divert $500 million
from other parts of his fiscal 1971
budget to help pay costs of court-
ordered desegregation and of up-
grading education in "racially irni-
pacted areas."
n; A sum of $1 billion will be bud-
geted for that purpose in fiscal
1922.
-The administration will not
force school districts to adopt bus-
ing plans to end racial segregation
of schools unless it is ordered
by the courts.
-School systems in all regions
of the country must move imme-
diately to end segregation of
teachers on the basis of race.
-' The administration will In-
sist on an end to de ,lure segrega-
tion, (segregation as a result of
discriminatory laws or practices),
T without seeking an end to de facto
segregation, or segregation result-
ing from housing patterns.
-Desegregation policies will be
pursued with equal vigor in the
North as well as the South.
-The government will not at-
tempt to establish an "arbitrary"
racial balance in the nation's
school systems.
*In communities where racial
Imbalance in schools is a result
of housing patterns, the govern-
ment will attempt to upgrade :the
educational quality of predomi-
nantly black schools.
--School districts under court
desegregation orders acting in
good faith to end de Sure segrega-
tion will be allowed latitude in
considering cost, eapaeitf and con-
venience for pupils and parents
in drawing up desegregation plans..
-Schools will not be exepected
to achieve "the kind of multiracial
society which the adult commu-
nity has failed for to achieve for
itself."
The president said some people
have interpreted administration
actions as signaling an effort. to
slow down desegregation.
In the past year alone, the num-
ber of black children attending
Southern schools held to be in
compliance. has doubled, from less
than 600,000 to nearly 1,204,000--
represeting 40 per cent of the Ne-
gro student population," he said.

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CLNEMA V-GREAT DIRECTOR'S FESTIVAL
ENDS TONIGHT'
A KAN JAN NEMEC'S
p
. "ORATORIO
j FOR
PRAGUE"
"Begun as a documentary of Ezec-
^ hoslovokia, and then simply can-
<m tinued when the Russian tanks
moved in marked with the
restraint and beauty of Nemec's
XX fi'" style so moving that one is
x;.r near tears from the first mo-
ment!"-N.Y. TIMES
"Soft Skin"-6:45
arlii .._. f.::}r "Oratorio"- 8,:45
"Soft Skin"-9 15
Ilk
THURSDAY and FRIDAY
"The freshest, funniest "
picture so far this year."I:.rl(US! <::}
-NBC Monitor :'{:":
ric
b,,r "
NeW York Times ft'.%-
A
. " :: it
1,:yrf 5:...
FG i "

By ART LERNER
"It's natural for a woman to
have long hair, and not a man,"
testified Washtenaw C o u n t y
Sheriff:' Douglas Harvey at a pre-
liminary hearing in Detroit
Monday to determine if Harvey
should be enjoined from cutting
the hair of any prisoners that
come into his custody.
The injunction is being sought
by four University students and
four ex-students whose heads
were "shaved to the scalp" fol-
lowing thteir arrests on Feb. 18.
They were charged with mis-
demeanors stemming from a
protest against GE recruiters on
campus. The eight " are suing
Harvey and two unnamed dep-
uties for $200,000 in damages
for the haircuts.
U.S. District Judge Lawrence

Gubow listened to testimony by
Harvey and other witnesses and
accpeted legal briefs from both
parties in the case. No decision
was made on the temporary in-
junction pending a further hear-
ing on April 8. No date has been
set for the damage suit itself.
Detroit civil liberties lawyer
Ernest Goodman, attorney for
the plaintiffs, called a number
of witnesses to the stand includ-
ing two of the plaintiffs and
Sheriff Harvey.
Harvey's attorney, Thomas
Shea, cross-examined the first
witness, David Wilson, a teach-
ing fellow in anthropology. Shea
probed into the academic life of
Wilson, and Goodman objected
on the grounds of irrelevancy.
In justification, Shea said he
"would like to know what kind

of animal we are dealing with."
Judge Gubow sustained the ob-
jection and reprimanded Shea
for the remark.
Harvey testified,, "Basically,
the main reason for cutting hair
is sanitation. There is no other
reasons."
However, Harvey admitted that
females did not have their hair
cut,-but contended that "vien
have thicker hair."
Goodman introduced repro-
.ductions of paintings from the
Rembrandt exhibit at the De-
troit Museum of Art. On the
witness stand, Harvey said that
if anyone looking like the sub-
jects of the paintings, which
included Aristotle, Dutch sheep-
herders and Jesus, where de-
tained in his jail, they would
also have their hair cut.

WATCH
for
MAN

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