100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 25, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE _MICHIGAN DAILY

Weclnesdav. Mauch 25. 1 970 j

TH MCIGNDAL

W i I auurArvlti 4 2 r

0:

Kng An inspiring
and political eulogy

By ALEXA CANADY
Last night, people in 300 cities
paid $5 a ticket. to see a special
film honoring the Rev. Martin
Luther King, Jr. The proceeds
from the film will go to the
Martin Luther King Special
Fund which is administered by
King's w i d o w, Mrs. Coretta
King.
The 22 - hour documentary
begins with the birth of King's
non-violent movement in 1955,
and ends with the Memphis
sanitation worker strike and
King's assassination in 1968.
King: A Filmed Record . - -
Montgomery to Memphis was a
nostalgic and. inspiring trip in-
to the past.
And although it was only 1968
when King was assassinated, the
spirit that characterized his
movement, has all but disap-
peared.
The people around King-hnd
therefore the movement itself-
had a cheerfulness and a sense
of hope that has been virtually
obliterated.
Perhaps much of this spirit
came because they have a lead-
er, and therefore a direction.
But seeing King and his fol-
lowers only made the longing
for a leader for today grow
stronger.
In his eulogy to King, Dr.'
Ralph Abernathy, called him a
"twentieth c e n t u r y prophet."
And perhaps that is the most
correct title. Because his move-
ment aimed at a moral awaken-
ing. As he said in Montgomery
in 1955, "I am depending on
moral and spiritual forces," to
set things right.
But if he was a prophet, he
was also an orator. Nothing can
match the oration of King. His
resonent voice, combined with a
supreme command of the lan-
guage gives his speeches a mag-
netism that was captured by the
film. .
The audience was caught up
in the emotion of the moment.
The "I Have a Dream" speech,
and the last speech he gave
where he said "I've seen the
mountain top" evoked spon-
taneous applause from the au-
dience.
But it is false to say that the
movie deals only in the past,
for the present haunted me.
The beginning of the movie
starts with King defending
himself against the "new, breed"
of black leadership. King ex-
presses his undying faith in the
inevitability of justice being
done, but in 1970, I can't quite
believe it anymore. He also says

that "violence is self-defeating"
but, although I want to believe
it, I have nagging doubts. I keep
thinking about the people who
are still living in wretched con-
ditions, even though, the right
laws were passed, and the most
offensive cities were marched in.
The buses, rest rooms, lunch
counter and drinking fountainsa
were desegregated, but the peo-
ple are still poor. And that is
what King realized and was be-
ginningto attack when he was
assassinated. King had helped
the black man win the social
issue, and therefore the moral
issue. But the economic issue re-
mained and the morality that
America has there is "take what
you can get."
Stokely Carmichael and others
were saying that an appeal' to
Americans conscience would not
be fruitful on economic issues.
King never had a chance to try
his moral suasion on economic
issues, but somehow I don't
think it would have been very
successful. I remember what
happened to Bobby Kennedy.
Nevertheless, King's firm con-
victions must be admired, as
must his actions to turn these
convictions into reality. Per-
haps he was as A. Phillip Ran-
dolph called him, "the moral
leader of our nation."

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B1dg.,before
2 p.m., of the' day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday . and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r e not accepted for
publication. F o0r7more informa-
tion, phone 764-4270.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 25 I
Day Calendar
Anatomy Seminar: M. H." S n o w.
"Historical Study of Minced M u s c I e
Regeneration in the Rat", G. R. Con-
over, "Effects of Dorsal Hippocampal
Lesions on the Entry Into Hibernation
in the Rat", L. Hsu, "Effect of In-
nervation on Minced Muscle Regenera-
tion in Frogs," Rm. 4804, Med. SI.
II, 1:00 p.m.
Social Work and Psych Seminar: Stev-
en Simmonds, Dept. of Health, Educ., &
Welfare, "The Nixon Family Assistance
Program and the 'Black Family", Rack-.
ham Amph., 2:00 p.m.
Engineering Seminar: L. S. G. Kova-
snay. Johns Hopkins, "The Turbulent
Boundary Layer", Rm. 325 W. Engin.,
4:00 p.m.
Botany Seminar: F. W. Went, "Role
of Volatile Plant Emanations in t h e
3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti and Ann Arbor
HURRY, HURRY
ENDS TUESDAY
MARCH 31
l1th CEMJURY-FOX PRESENTS
THE SUNDANCE KID

Atmosphere", 170 Physics - Astron., 4:00
p.m.
Urban Planning Lect., Paul Reid. Di-
rector, SEMCOG, "Federal Housing -
Programs and Legislation for the De-
troit Region", 130 Bus. Ad., 4:00 p.m.
Speech (Student Lab Theater): "Ana-
tole," Arena Theater, Frieze Bldg.. 4:10
p.m.
Russian and East European Lect.: Sirr
Isaiah Berlin, Wolfson Coll., Oxford.
Eng|.. "The Obsession of Russians with
Historicism in the Nineteenth and
Twentieth Centuries". 1035 Angell Hall,
4:10 p.m.
Degree Recital: Colette Bick, violin,
School of Music Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
Center for South and Southeast As-
ian Studies Concert: North Indian Mu-
sic, Amjad Ali Khan, sarod; Pandit
Sharda Mishra, tabla, Rackham Lect.
HII, 8:30 p.m.
!Placeinen I Ser c('
GENERAL DIVISIO)N
3200 S.A.B.
Current Positions Received, avail, im-
mediately, call 764-7460.
!Short Term Employment of Art tSu-
dent: design in office lobby, week or
two, good pay.
Monarch Insurance Co., Saginaw, sales
and mgmt. potential positions in mid-
Mich., referrals nationwide.
Lutheran Social Services Toledo,
Ohio, caseworker for 23 counties, fam-
ily and marriage counseling, unwed par-
ents and adoption MSW, any denomi-
nation, serves total community.
(Continued on Page 7)
' MARCH' 24 & 25
Tuesday & Wednesday
Due to the mail strike, Cinema
Guild doesn't receive films in
the mail. Therefore, we can't
guarantee what we advertise.
The only film we have re-
ceived to date is "invasion of
the Body Snatchers."
Since it doesn't seem likely
that "The Shape of Things to
Come" will arrive, we will
show "Body Snatchers" both
Tues. and Wed, nights, and
hope that the weekend films
arrive.

ENDS THURSDAY
WALTER MATTHAU
INGRID BERGMAN
GOLDIE: HAWN
Todoy at 1:10-3-5-7-9 P.M.

1 1
elk

Program Info: NO 2-6264
HELD OVER!
3rd WEEK.. .

I

-Daily-Jim Judkis

By MARCIA ABRAMSON'
A brilliant choice of material
and a remarkable cast made
last night's presentation of two
Spanish farces one of the best
productions ,I have seen any-
where. There can be only one
regret about the production of
Cervantes' El Retablo de las
Maravillas and Fernando Arra-
bal's El Triciclo: that it will not
be accessible to more people.
Perhaps as a public service the
cast will present the plays in
English at least once.
Although the two plays are
separated by . nearly 400 years.
- in time, they are intricately re-
lated. Both present farcical
-views of man. and Spain. And inr
the 400, years. between Cervantes
-.and Arrabal, the world has vis-
ibly darkened. Cervantes peas-
ants are silly and gullible, but
they are tremendously vital,
costumed beautifully in vibrant
reds, oranges and yellows. Arra-
bal's waif - like slum - dwellers
are thin and, ragged,'and the
color of their world Is, grey tex-
cept for bright streaks of graf-
fiti on a dingy wall.
Cervantes' entremes (s h o r, t
one-act play designed to fill the
intermission) is a bright farce
about the residents of a pro-
vincial town who are taken in
by a clever, pair of traveling
rogues, La Chirinos (Virginia
Santaliz de . Rodriguez) and
Chanfalla (Mike J o n e s), who
claim to offer a magic show of
Wonders.
The catch is that only those
of pure S p a n i s.h, Christian
blood can view the show. None
of the villagers want to be stig-
matized by impure Jewish or
Moorish blood, the worst curse
of Cervantes' Spain, so they all<
"see" the show which includes
Sanson destroying the temple,
a shower of golden dew and the
d'ance of Herodias, among other'
wonders. gWhen saroyalofficerr.
arrives, villagers accuse him for
not "seeing" and he chases them
away in. anger. The rogues es-
cape laughing; they have al-
ready been paid for the show.
In Arrabal's absurdist play,
two wanderers earn their living

by riding children on a giant
tricycle. But one of the partners
is always sleeping, so they are
having a payment problem. A
friend, Mita (Christine Koski-
maki) comes along and event-
ually the two vagabonds decide
to rob and murder a rich man
who has been following her.
They commit the crime, but do
not flee, and soon are captured
by Authority - a magnificent,
s h i n y blue-helmeted, bla c k
leather - jacketed a n d n i g h t-
sticked cop straight off the
streets of Ann Arbor or any-
where. After a while, Climando
and Apal are led off like the
'little children they are, with-
out questions, and Mita and an
old man ride off happily on the
tricycle.
These characters are defined
by their childishness; they are
always playing. Mita cannot sit
still; she must always play with
something; Apal's foot, her
hair. What Arrabal means be-
comes clear as the children are
overwhelmedsby the- tangible
presence of the system that has
destroyed them; .they are terri-
fied. Their own childishness has
been forced on them by the
social system, by church, state,
money. Their cruelty cannot be
their fault in such a state of
reduction.
This, the producers and cre-
ators of last night's production
seemed to be saying, is what has
happened to the silly but living
people of Cervantes' world. The
trickery is gentle, the mockery
soft in Cervantes' play. Spain
is not such a bad place; there
is no overwhelming evil in it
But Arrabal presents a horrify-
ing spectre of a world, inwhich
there seems to be very little
GRASS'
HANDBOOK
THE MARIJUANA MANUAL
Send $1.00 to Dart Enterprises,4
rg' P.O. Box 40, Village Station,%
New York, N.Y. 10014 '

hope. These are the esults of
the 400 years of decadence andr
the sores of the modern world..
All the acting was brilliant,
and especially excellent were all
six major characters: Miss San-
taliz and Jones in the Cervantes
play, and Luis Argueta, Tom
Donnelly, John Allen and Miss
Koskimaki in the Arrabal piece.
Miss Santaliz' strutting in a loW-
cut peasant blouse with a rose
between her breasts reminded
me of the triumphant walk of.
Mrs. Waters in the movie Tons
Jones, and Jones' magnificent
conjuring gestures displayed a
magic grace and quite possibly
dance training4 Miss Koskimaki
was simply perfect. Not enough
can be said for any of them.

SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00-5:00
7:00-9:10 P.M.
NOMINATED FOR 9
ACADEMY AWARDS

I

I1

INVASION OF THE
BODY SNATCHERS
dir. DONALD SIEGAL, 1956

I

PANAMION* COLOR 6Y .OELW E

7& 9
662-8871

Architecture
Auditorium

3PANAYI$oNAT*tO- oR TDLX
MI ".e.. xaw v

I

i

THURSDAY

MARCH 26

_

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
N OW FOX'EASTERN THEATRES
SHOWING FO.AVILL6
375 No. MAPLE RD. -76941300

TIMES
1:30-4:00
6:45-9:20

Noon Luncheon Series continues on
"Human Convictions and the Religious Crisis"
"AN EASTERN VIEW OF MAN
AND' NATURE"

_CHILDREN'S PRICE AT ALL SHOWS ^~
Dzzling!
ex erien~e
thriling! A R
Cliffhanger,
in space!"
-L.A.Times

I

11

3

I

MRS. LE THI ANH
Philosopher and Writer from Vietnam
ECUMENICAL CAMPUS CENTER, 921 Church
LUNCH-50c
ATTENTION MARKLEY RESIDENTS
We invite all Markley residents to welcome
the Sabbath with Rabbi Bruce Warshal, Fri-
day, March 27, 5 P.M. at a traditional Sab-

1

I

University cooperative
REDUCED PRICES
PARTIAL LISTING OF CURRENT SERVICES
Save 2-3c gal. on gasoline
Save money on appliances
Save 10% on haircuts
Save Up to 501% on Optical Needs
JOIN THE COOP
COOP OFFICE, Basement, Michigan Union
Phone 761-2808; Hours 11:30-3:30
STUDENT CREDIT UNION, 1st Floor, Michigan Union
EMPLOYEE'S CREDIT UNION, 508 E. William
The University Cooperative is non-profit, consumer
service organization, owned and controlled by its
members
University Cooperative

If you are interested in helping
to defend our planet against the
three greatest enemies of man-
kind - unlimited. factional con-
flict potentially resulting in ca-
tastrophic total war, environ-
mental p o ll u t i o n threatening
gradual deterioration of the bio-
sphere, and the pressures of un-
checked population growth -
you can not afford to be with-
out the ideological ammunition
in The Internationalist Per-
spective.
If you are tired of the partici-
patory cultural exchange games
of the New Left, the irrelevance
of pacifism, and the bankruptcy
of liberalism, you would not want
to miss the ideas in The Inter-
nationalist Perspective. If you
*want to preview the concepts of
the next century instead of hear-
ing sterile repetitions of the last
century's cliches, you can find
solid food for thought in the
pages of The Internationalist
Perspective.

both dinner in,

Markley Dining Room 3.

Meet at 5 P.M. in Markley Lounge 3. For
reservations call 663-4129 by Thursday eve-
ning, March 26. Bring meal card.

SPONSORED BY HILLEL HOUSE

A.

....-

I

I,

I

RADICAL FILM SERIES
and
REVIEW PRESENTATIONS

DAVE'S CORVETTE & CUSTOM SHOP
Expert Autobody Repair -Speed Parts Sold
All Makes and Models - Specialize in Fiberglas
310 N. River
YPSILANTI - 483-3441

I

I

Our literature would be of par-
ticular interest to students of
philosophy and to all sincerely
concerned about the problems of
war and peace in this techno-
logical era.
± ~ $3 for four issues
and two essays
The-Internationalist Perspective
P.O. Box 639, Nea York 100009

present

THE FIRST-RUN CAMPUS PREMIERE OF
'FIDIEL,

I

I

I

I

I

III

The Center for South and Southeast Asian Studies
PRESENTS
Amjad Ali Khan-sarod
Sharda Maharaj-tabla

Ii'
I!
ii
II

Sviatoslav Richter

1O

THE CELEBRATED SOVIET PIANIST

will be presented in a Special Recital

A CONCERT Of NORTH INDIAN MUSIC

11

II

in Hill Auditorium

ill

FIDEL is a brilliantly insightful profile of the leader of the Cuban.revolution

V

I',

.

D ill ! I EEII

L, - , _ IN

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan