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March 24, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday. March 241970

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I

'U' considers construction of
low-cost housing for students

I11

month lease - substantially lower
than the average in Ann Arbor.
Boothby says, the University'
construction of 5000 units would
provide Ann Arbor landlords with
r serious competition, thus "break-
- ing the market" and compelling
landlords to significantly lower
their rents.
- In addition, Boothby contends
that the construction of new facil-
ities would, by giving more people
places to live, force the vacancy
rate up and pressure landlords in-
to consistenly maintaining their
buildings well.
The housing office began plan-
ning the construction of 1000
spaces in 1968 and is currently
awaiting the needed funds. Feld-
kamp maintains that by offering
rlower rents, the University dwell-
ings can have some effect in forc-
ing other landlords to lower their
rents. But he says this would not
have the dramatic impact that
Boothby envisions.
The only way to d this, Feld-
kamp recognizes, is to build low-
;ost housing in large quantities -
perhaps 5000 spaces. But he main-
tains that the University cannot
find the money to build even 1000
without a tuition assessment.
And Feldkamp doubts that the
University would build 5000 spaces
of one type of housing -for
single students - in one chunk
without testing the effect that a
smaller amount has on the market.
However, Boothby says that
single student, housing is not the
:nly kind he envisions, saying that
a large position of the dwellings
should be occupied by families of
varying sizes. In addition, he be-
lieves the housing crisis so severe
that 5000 spaces must be provided
immediately to ease the situation.
Boothby further disagrees with
Feldkamp that a tuition assess-
ment is necessary to building the
dwellings.
He argues that the University as
a state institution, is entitled to
issue tax-free bonds whose interest
- up to $3.3 million per year-is
paid by the government. This dis-
count would, he says, allow the
University to construct the 5000
spaces in the tight market situ-
;tion.
Feldkamp says that floating the
7onds alone would not provide
enough money to construct the
units. The reason, he says, is be-
cause construction costs are so
high, they would offset the amount
the University saves through is-
suing the bonds,
Again, Boothby counters that
Feldkamp exaggerates the cost of
constructing the buildings. But
Boothby acknowledges that a tui-
tion assessment. might be neces-
sary to fund the project.
Certain an assessment is es-
sential, Feldkamp says he will in-
terpret the referendum, if it wins,
as a mandate for a tuition hike,
Faculty ad
'reaction
Continued from page 1
"The timing of the statement is
especially unfortunate," SACUA
Chairman Joseph Payne said, "be-
cause it appears to relate to BAM
when this was not the intent."
Payne added that "all BAM ac-
tions have been non-violent."
The Radical College is current-
ly circulating a statement to
counter this one, which says that
without condoning violence, t h e
signers believe that any action has
to be considered within the con-
text that inspires it.

which, he maintains, will complete
funding of the 1000 spaces,
s The two also disagree over just
how many units should be con-
structed. Boothby says that 500
-paces are necessary to provide
for between 1000 and 2000 com-
muting students.
Feldkamp maintains that he
recognizes the need for housing
these students in Ann Arbor, but
asserts that a sizeable number of
the commuters do not want to live
here. Boothby says he finds this
r argument ridiculous, wondering
why the students would not, i
they had the choice, want to live
in the city where they attend
school.
And they could, he claims, ii
the high rents did not drive them
out.
Another difference of opinion
lies in who should control the
setting of the housing units' poli-
cies. Boothby argues that a board
of tenants - students and mem-
bers of the community - be es-
tablished to control the planning
and financing of the buildings as
well as the rent and lease dura-
tion. Tenants, he -maintains, are
better qualified to make these de-
,isions than the housing office
which he says has made incom-
petent judgments in the past.
Feldkamp responds that finan-
cing the units would be more dif-
ficult if the University did not
have direct control. If the Univer-
3ity was not making the policies,
he says, financiers would be less
willing to make the investments.
And finally Boothby maintains
that the University must make up
for the effects of its enrollment
increases in the '50s which, he
says, by lowering vacancy rates
and consequently increasing rents,
irove many working people cut of
Ann Arbor. Thus, he concludes,
the housing should be open to
persons other than students -
particularly working people.
P Feldkamp says he is studying
how other universities - whose
housing includes both students
and members of the community -
handle the problem,
He generally believes that the
students needs should be met first
and additionally fears that by pro-
viding for members of the com-
muity as well, financiers may
again be unwilling to back the
projects.
The specific location of the
housing is unclear now, but there
are apparently some places open
near Central Campus and more
available on North Campus.
DOWNTOWN
HONDA,
- -
$ f
Honda Super Sport.CB350
Buy
;jWhere
The
Service
Is
310 E. Washington

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City council sets up
drug study committee
By SHARON WEINER ". . . Hopefully, we will be get-
City Council last night estab- ting more information to the
lished a citizens' c onitt ee community than ever before on
charged with studying community this extremely serious problem,
drug problems and recommending the statement continued. "Even
appropriate action. more important, we should be
getting broadly - based, informed
The ad hoc group will report to recommendations for concrete ac-
council "within a month" on its tion."

i

proposed schedule for making in-t
terim and final reports to thej
council and to the community.
The committee was proposed by
Mayor Robert Harris, and was
unanimously approved by council.
"For the past several months
my office has been consultingj
with various people in the coin-
munity concerning the growing
drug abuse problems in Ann Ar-
bor," Harris states in a message ,
read to council by CouncilmanT
LeRoy Cappaert.t

Members of the committee, sub-
ject to confirmation at next week's
council meeting, include Law Prof.
William Pierce, who will act as
chairman: Probate Judge Francis
O'Brian: editor of the Ann Arbor
News Arthur Gallager: Det. Lt.
E u g e n e Staudenmeier: several
University professors and stu-
dents. several local high school
and junior high school students.
and others in "various fields of
medical science and administra-
tion of justice."

I

i

-l

" Roller Skates
* Nerf Balls
* Fly a Kite
" GIiders
" Exciting Games
* Robin Hood Bicycles

*EAST BASKETS
" EASTER GRASS
" Water Guns
" Paddle Balls
" Flying Saucers
" Yo-yb's
" Schwinn Bicycles

I HAVE A PLACE
FOR YOU TO LIVEf
FOR NOW, THE SUMMER OR
THE FALL . WON'T YOU
COME IN?
STUDENT
L IVING
QUARTERS
1217 S. UNIVERSITY

i

by Raleigh, Special $46.50
"The Friendly Student Store"
CA~nMPUS BIKE & TOY

662r6591

514 East William

Phone 662-0035

R r r

f

213 S. STATE ST
,
OPEN 10-6
NO GAMESDiCOUNT
CENTER
COME AND GET IT COU PON
cupimma, sDISCOUNT
FLAVOR
SPECIAL S
CHAMPAGNE $
JASMINE
ORANGE BLOSSOM
ONLY
LIMIT 1-EXPIRES 3-30-70
$2.50 VALUE-COUPON
STYLE 1975 VALUABLE RECORD COUPON
SEAMLESS CROSBY, STILLS, NASH & YOUNG
PANTY "DEJA-VU" Reg. $3.67 NOW $2.67
HOSE THREE DOG NIGHT Reg NOW
LIVE AT THE FORUM 3.67 2.67
Limit 4-Expires 3-30 Limit One of Each-Expires 3-30
COUPON COUPON COUPON
$1.00 Value-I oz. $1.49 Value-13 oz. Box of 40
OLD SPICE WHITE MEDS
MANPOWER RAIN
LIME HAIR SPRAY TAMPONS
SHAVE CREAM
4c88c, 86c
Limit 2-Expires 3-30 Limit 1-Expires 3-30 Limit 3-Expires 3-30
COUPON COUPON COUPON
$1.05 Value-6.75 oz. $3.04 Value-x-16 oz. 89c Value
COLGATE PIOHXLACTONA
PHINSOHEXToothbrush
DENTAL CREAM
58c 9936C
Limit 1-Expires 3-30 Limit 1-Expires 3-30 Limit 2-Expires 3-30
COUPON COUPON COUPON
Bottle of 100 $14.00 Value
1/ ,..Tr kA r s1CLAIROL /0

aI

*I

CYNTHIA STEPHENS
DARRYL GORMAN
BRUCE WILSON
JOAN MARTIN
For LS&A
PRESIDENT & VICE-PRESIDENT:
BRAND & FORD (Endorsed)

SPEAK RUSSIAN WITH RUSSIANS IN
MOSCOW THIS SUMMER 1 WHY NOT I
The Department ofSlavic Languages and Literatures is offer-
ing a special opportunity to students in any discipline who
wish to ledrn Russian and visit the Soviet Union this summer.
If you do not know any Russian you may enroll in Russicin 105,
intensive 1st year, during the Spring Half-Term (iIIA) for eight
credits. You are then eligible to participate in the Tour pro-
gram in the Summer Half-Term (IIIB). For 52 weeks you will
study second year Russian and then jet to the U.S.S.R. for
three weeks of touring. The IIIB program will give 8 credits for
Russian 205 and 4 additional credits for "Field Work in the
Soviet Union."
Students already having completed some Russian language
instruction and wishing to take part in the tour may enroll in -
intensive second, third or fourth year in IIIB and receive credit
for these courses and "Field Work."
Students participating in the Tour program are selected from
colleges and universities all over the nation, so you can ex-
pect some interesting companions.
The Tour group will fly to Moscow around August 2nd. Other
cities visited will include Leningrad; Novgorod, Kiev, and
probably Black Sea resort towns. Tour costs include jet econo-
my from Detroit to Moscow and return to New York, all trans-
portation and accommodations in the Soviet Union, plus visa
fee and baggage and accident insurance. Cost of the pro-
gram (not including tuition or accommodations in Ann Arbor)
is $790.00.
The Tour will be led by a member of the Department of Slavic
Languages. In the Soviet Union students are provided numer-
ous excursions to places of cultural and social interest. Con-

I

NELSON & LITTLETON

(Endorsed)

COLE & HOFFMAN Highly Acceptable)
MEMBERS AT LARGE: (all endorsed)
GERALD COLE
KEN LASSER
ANDY WEISSMAN
RAY LITTLETON

A

i

I

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