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March 24, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-24

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NW York Daily mmes
New. York Post."Nr
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Positivelly
f ENDS
Thursday
low Yok ima
OUCTIoN

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

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Tuesday, March 24, 1970

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page three
Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

..
Nrwseek

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11

TONITE
at the

PRESIDENT NIXON will issue a lengthy statement to the
nation this morning on the school integration situation.
The President has spent weeks discussing the problem with key
administration leaders, educators and black leaders inside and out-
side the administration, White House spokesmen said.
The statement will not be televised.
A RAILROAD UNION LEADER told Congress yesterday that
any delay in forcing the settlement of stalled rail industry
negotiations could bring on a nationwide strike.
William W. Winpisinger, chief negotiator for four AFL-CIO shop-
craft unions, said he preferred Congress enact the forced settlement
proposed by President Nixon rather than risk further delay.
His appeal for a congressionally enforced settlement ran counter
to a long record of bitter union opposition to imposed solutions for
labor disputes.
The rail workers in the 15-month-old dispute over wages and job
jurisdiction are working under a 37-day strike ban ordered by Con-
gress. It expires April 11.
CARLO GAMBINO, regarded by authorities as the Cosa
Nostra's 'boss of bosses,' was arrested by the FBI in New York
yesterday.
Gambino was charged with conspiracy in connection with a
plannedh$6-million armored car robbery. A Senate committee has
called the 67-year-old Gambino one of "the most powerful under-
world leaders in the United States."
A NORTH VIETNAMESE ADVANCE has driven 80,000-
100,000 Laotion refugees out of the area south of the Plain of
Jars, a U.S. government official said yesterday. '
Edgar Buell, a refugee administrator in Laos for the U.S. Agency
for International Development, said in a news conference that 4,000-
5,000 of the refugees are likely to die from disease. The North Viet-,
namese advance has been going on throughout the last week.
Shortly before Buell spoke with newsmen, Laotian premier Prince
Souvanna Phouma told the nation in an Army Day speech that years
of fighting had made refugees out of 700,000 Laotions. The country
has a population estimated at three million.
CAMBODIA'S new government yesterday held out prospects
for improved relations with the United States.
Cheng Heng, the provinsional head of state following the over-
throw last Wednesday of Prince Norodom Sihanouk, emphasized he
intends to return Cambodia to a position of "true neutrality."
American forces operating in Tay Ninh Province in South Viet-
nam have been ordered to exercise caution to avoid border violations
or other incidents involving Cambodia, informed sources said yes-
terday.
VIRUS-CANCER RESEARCH has produced two new cancerj
tests, scientists from the National Cancer Institute announced
yesterday.
One test serves as an indicator of whether a patient will be a good
candidate for surgery by challenging his natural defense mechanisms.
The other is a skin test which may be valuable in identifying
persons with a high risk of developing cancer.
Both tests grew out of virus-cancer research being conducted by
the federal government.
** *
THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION is toning down
its announced package warning for 8.5 million users of oral con-
traceptives.
After pressure from physicians, drug manufacturers and high
government officials, the 600-word leaflet announced earlier this
month is being extensively reworded, an FDA spokesman confirmed
yesterday.
In a major change, the revised draft says "rare instances of blood
clotting are the most important known complications of the oral con-
traceptives." The original wording was much sharper on clots.
The warning would be contained in all packages of oral contra-
ceptives for the education of users.

-Daily-Nancy wechsler
Eviction protest

Court rules for
hearings rirt
welf are cutoffs
WASHINGTON (-- The Supreme Court yesterday gave
the more than nine million Americans on welfare the right
to a formal hearing before their benefits can be suspended.
The 5-3 decision requires welfare officials to allow any
individual threatened with a cutoff to appear in person and
to challenge and cross-examine witnesses, including the case4
worker. Meanwhile, the welfare payments would be con-
tinued.
Only this kind of an evidentiary hearing, said Justice
William J. Brennan Jr. for the majority, satisfied the 14th

GOLIARD BRASS [NSEMBLE
with the
Vox Humana Chamber Ensemble
(16 voice madrigal group)
all dontations go to Martin Luther King Fund
9 P.M.
1421 Hill 761-1451

Picketers gather around the mobile home of Mrs. Sarah Golden
at the Bell Home Village in Belleville to block the removal of her
home. Thirty-five Tenants Union and UAW members gathered
there yesterday for the protest. See story, Page 12.
125 FIGHTERS:

+!

III

Nixon denies Israeli
request for more jets.

Amendment's command that
citizens be afforded due pro-
ces of law.
He said he realizes the hearings
would cost the states money and
that payments once made would
be impossible to recoup, even when
a cutoff is proved to be justified.
But, Brennan said, the eligible
recipient's interest in receiving aid
that he may desperately and im-
mediately need, coupled with the
state's interests in not barring a
deserving person by mistake, out-
weighs administrative and fiscal
burdens.
Public assistance is not mere
charity, Brennan said, but-quot-
ing from the preamble to the Con-
stitution-a means to "promote
the general welfare, and secure
the blessing of liberty to ourselves
and our posterity."
The ruling united three liberals,
Brennan and Justices William 0.
Douglas and Thurgood Marshall
with two generally conservative
justices, John M. Harlan and By-
ron R. White.
The Court was considering New
York and California procedures for
reviewing welfare cases before sus-
pending aid. In one vote, the Court
ruled both states' procedures un-
constitutional.
Chief Justice Warren E. Burger
and Justice Hugo L. Black filed
strong dissenting opinions. The
third dissenter, Justice Potter Ste-
wart, said the issue was a close one
for him but that he had decided
the New York and California pro-
cedures challenged in the court do
riot violate the Constitution.
Black's dissent stressed the ad-
administrative b u r d e n hearings
would cause the states. He said the
court action serves to "paralyze
the government's efforts to pro-
tect itself against making pay-
ments to people who are not en-
titled to them."

"1

BACH CLUB

PRESENTS
ANOTHER FANTASTIC PROGRAM!!
Live Performance of Randolph Smith's
SONATA MOVEMENT IN B MINOR
GINA ERDREICH, Flute
RUTH BURTON, Violin
PHIL ZARET, Cello
with short, ILLUMINATING remarks (with musical
illustration) by Randolph Smith (Bach Club Pres.
and Founder) on:
" What Makes a Piece a Piece
* How to Write Music
* How to Plagiarize Music
" Bach's Musical Offering
ABSOLUTELY NO MUSICAL KNOWLEDGE IS NEEDED
TO UNDERSTAND THE REMARKS
WEDNESDAY, MAR. 25-8 P.M.
1236 Washtenaw at Forest (near S. Univ.)
EVERYBODY WELCOME! Refreshments and Fun
tfterwards. 663-2827, 761-7356, 764-9887
CINEMA Y's
GREAT DIRECTORS' FESTIVAL
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY-MARCH 24, 25
JAN NEMEC'S
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WASHINGTON (I)-The United
States yesterday stalled action on
an Israeli request for additional
warplanes because "in our judg-
ment Israel's air capacity is suf-
ficient to meet its needs for the
time being."
In announcing the decision,
Secretary of State William P.
Rogers told a news conference
that President Nixon decided to
hold the request for 25 additional
E'4 Phantoms and 100 A4 Sky-
hawks "in abeyance for now."
On the other hand, the United
States responded favorably to Is-
rael's request for economic as-
sistance. The amount involved is
in the neighborhood of $100 mil-
lion, Rogers said.
In Jerusalem, Israeli, Foreign
Minister Abba Eban asked the
United States to reconsder ur-
gently its decision against sending
further warplanes to Israel now,
or face the prospect of "an ex-
panded conflict" in the' Middle
East.
In a statement b r o a dc a s t
throughout Israel, Eban expressed
disappointment and concern at the
decision. He said it might "in-
crease the belligerence" of Egypt.
But he thanked Rogers for his
promise of $100, million in econ-
omic aid.
He also said Israel attaches im-
portance to Rogers' comment that
the United States is carefully ex-
amining the Middle East conflict
and the arms buildup in that re-
gion.
At the outset of his first news

conference in three months, Rog-
ers read a statement on the Israeli
request. He said the request has
been "carefully and sympathetic-
ally considered in the light of the
military situation."
The United States, Rogers said,
will 'keep a "close watch on the
military balance in the area." He
assured Israel that this country
will provide aircraft "promptly if
the situation requires it."
Officials in Washington said
that the reported introduction of
SAM3 Soviet ground-to-air mis-
siles into Egypt, though disturbing,
did not affect Nixon's decision to
deny Israel's request for war-
planes because the SAM is a de-
fensive weapon and the adminis-
tration recognizes the right of
both sides to defend themselves.

Hi g court
ton movie ease
The Supreme Court yesterday
agreed to rule on the alleged ob-
scenity of the film "I Am Curious
(Yellow)."
The court will hear an appeal
by Grove Press, Inc., the importer
of the Swedish film and owner of
American distribution rights. The
appeal challenges Maryland's mo-
tion picture censorship law and
seeks a ruling that will prevent all
injunctions against films. Such a
decision would prohibit all offi-
cials from preventing adults from
seeing any movie in any American
theater.
The court also agreed to review
a ruling in Boston that banned
showing of the movie.
"I Am Curious (Yellow)" has
been banned from showing in Ann
Arbor until the question of its ob-
scenity will be taken to trial. The
Fifth Forum theater and lawyers
for Grove Press appealed the tem-
porary injunction in the Circuit
Court of Appeals, and State Court
of Appeals, but were refused both
times.
The Defense has taken the case
to the State Supreme Court, ques-
tioning the constitutionality of the
clause in a state obscenity law
which allows judges to issue re-
straining orders against the show-
ing of films upon receiving a com-
plait from any local official. They
are awaiting a reply from -the
court.
In a separate ruling, the court
held (6-2) that the Swedish film,
"I, a Women," is not obscene. The
decision reversed the conviction of
the owners and manager of a
Louisville, Ky., movie theater
where the movie had played.
Chief Justice Warren E. Burger,
dissenting, said "we should not in-
flexibly deny to each of the states
the power to adopt and enforce its
own standards as to obscenity and
pornographic materials."
"States ought to be-free- to deal
with varying conditions and prob-
lems in their area.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail,.
Summer Session published Tuesday
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jmail.

NATIONAL GENERAL CORPORATION
NOW FOX EASTERN THEATRE A
SHOWING FOR VLLBGE
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TIMES
1:30-4:00
6:45-9:20

Committee formed to
study child care center

CHILDREN'S PRICE AT ALL SHOWS

" Dazzling!
Avivid
experience.
thrilling! A
cliffhanger
in space!"
-L. A.Times

i'FRANKO IPCw EST R
hor Clmbi ~

NO EVENING SHOWS-TUES., MARCH 24 _
"TRIBUTE TO KING-MONTGOMERY TO MEMPHIS"
ONE'SHOWING-8:00 P.M., ONLY

By HESTER PULLING
President Robben Fleming and
the Child-Care Action Group for-
mulated plans yesterday for of-
ficials and Action Group members
to study the feasibility of a Uni-
versity-supported child care cen-
ter.
The meeting was a response to
last week's demands for child care
which the group had presented to
Fleming.
"There just isn't enough child-
care available," one woman said
as three children crawled under
the conference table and played
around the room.
"We want some real commit-
ment on the part of the Univer-

sity," another woman added.
"Child-care is the type of benefit
that women are entitled to."
The group then discussed with
Fleming the possibility of starting
a center in the University School's
nursery school room. The Univer-
sity School, under the auspices of
the education school, is closing in
June, and it already has physical
facilities appropriate for small
children.
Fleming agreed to check into
this idea and also made plans to
establish a committee to work with,
the child-care group.
The child-care group insisted
the proposed University School
center would be only a beginning.

I

f

I

"Begun as a documentary of Czec-
hoslovakia, and then simply con-
tinued when the Russian tanks
moved in . . . marked with the
restraint and beauty- of Nemec's
style . . . so moving that one is
near tears from the first mo-
ment!"-N.Y. TIMES

a

TOUR

EUROPE

"Soft Skin"-6:45
"Oratorio"-8:45
~"Soft Skin"--9:15

BY

CAR

THURSDAY,I
YVES ROBERT'S
"Alexander"

FRIDAY-MARCH 26, 27
MILOS FORMAN'S
C& "Firemen's Ball"

SATURDAY, SUNDAY-MARCH 28, 29-PETER SELLERS IN
"Heavens Above" and "I'm All Right, Jack"
MONDAY, TUESDAY-MARCH 30, 31
SHIRLEY CLARKE'S MICHAEL ROEMER'S
"Cool World" & "Nothing But a Man"
WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY-APRIL 1, 2
JOSEPH LOSEY'S 2 MICHAEL TRUMAN'S
"The Accident" Ca "Model Murder Case"
FRIDAY, SATURDAY-APRIL 3, 4
BO WIDERBERG'S KAREL REISZ'S
"Elvira Madigan" &"Morgan"
SUNDAY, MONDAY-APRIL 5, 6
CLAUDE BERRI'S BRUCE BROWN'S
"The Two of Us" & "Endless Sulmmer"

I

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L.

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