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March 22, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-22

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Page Eight.

THE M[CHIGAN DAILY

Sundoy, Morch 22, 1970

1.

.P g e E i h tTH.M C H G A D I L

Sunday. March 22 1970

,' ' . .. ..__

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
^' '-aft s v a

x

ISKI ARGENTINA
SIGN UP FOR THESE TRIPS:'
ARGENTINA: Aug. 15-Sept. 1 about $460
aUCKERMANS RAVINE, N.H.:
April 25-May 5 (about) $25,
ALTA, UTAH: April 28-May 10 (about) $150
Get More Details
MONDAY. MARCH 23
7:30 P.M. IN THE UNION
Use Daily Classifieds

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B l d g., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r esnoteaccepted for
publication. F o r more inform'a-
tion, phone 764-4270.
SUNDAY, MARCH 22
Day Calendar
Arab Organization Symposium: "Pal-
estine, the Arabs, and Zionism", As-
sembly Hall, Mich. Union, 1:00 - 4:30
p.m.
Recital: Marjorie Kilbride, piano,
Seh. of Music Recital Hall, 2:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Martha Walters, oboe,
School of Music Recital Hall, 4:30 p.m.
International Center Film Series: -
"Ski the Outer Limits," "The 'In' in
Winter", and "The Rink", Interna-
tional Center, 7:30 p.m.
Degree Recital: Thomas W i t t e,
French horn, School of Music Recital
Hall, 8:00 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 23
Industrial Engineering Seminar: Jas.
Hartman, Case Western Reserve U.,
"Doubly Coupled Linear Programs",
OZONE HOUSE
Runaway House
Community Center
3 P.M.-CANTERBURY
330 Mayrard
THIS SUNDAY WE'RE GOING
TO ORGANIZE TO GET GOING

Rm. 229 W. Engin., 3:00 p.m.
Physics Seminar: T. L. Jenkins, Case
Western Reserve U., "Pi-p Charge -
Exchange at Larg Momentum Trans-
fers", P&A Colloq., Rm., 4:00 p.m.
Engineering Mechanics Seminar:
Prof. F. Mansur, U. of Illinois, "Buck-
ling, Post-Buckling, and Limit Analy-
sis of Completely Symmetric Elastic
Systems", 311 W. Engin., 4:00 p.m.
Classical Studies and Speech a n d
Professional Theatre Program Lecture:
Takis Muzenidis, Director, Nat'l. Thea-
tre of Greece, "Problems of Mode- ,In-
terpretation of Ancient Drama":
Rackham Amph., 4:10 p.m.
Degree Recital: Myles Mazur, bass
trombone, Sch. of Music Recital Hall,
8:00 p.ma.
Degree Recital: Delbert Disselhorst,
organ, Hill Aud., 8:00 p.m.
Geography Lecture: R. W. Kates, D.
D. Baumann, Clark U., "Perception of
Natural Hazards in iCties also re-
peat of Geog. Dept's. multi-media pro-
gram. Rackham Amph., 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
Regent's Meeting: April 16 and 17.
Communications for consideration at
this meeting must be in the President's
hands no later than April 2.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
Interviews at General Div., call, 763-
1363 for appts. weeks of March 23, and
March 30 - April 3.
Boy Scouts of America
ComputerSoftware Systems
Kresge Co.
Michigan Civil Service
(Continued on Page 10)

Housing
shortage
expected
there is no new building, as long
as tight money is in existence,
there will be a problem and it
will necessarily worsen." l
The IS member is certain there
will be no improvement in the
market for at least two years. He
says nothing substantial could
happen by Fall, 1971, because this
would necessitate the beginning
of construction of new dwellings.
In addition, some housing offi-
cials estimate it can take as much
as three years for large amounts
of low-cost housing to be con-
structed, from the time plans are
first initiated.
Feldkamp estimates that it takes
one year for land acquisition and
planning and two years for con-
struction time.

(Continued from Page 1) Black considers the tenure issue
process, and an extended pass-fail to be the most important. "Stu-
system. dents have nothing." Black said,
She also supports an "all-stu- referring to what he said was aI
dent court for non-academic of- lack of official student voice in
fenses on campus." tenure decisions.
She says that the University All three] candidates. Ross,
should give its support to the Free Black and Markowitz, want exten-
University but not grant credit- to sion of pass-fail, but do not want
its courses, since that "would take pass-fail grading for all courses,
away some of the value of the according to Black.
Free U."'

Bob Black, Richard Ross and
Larry Markowitz are running for
the executive council on the "Edu-
cational Action Committee" ticket.
The candidates want exclusive
student control in areas which
concern only students, but favor
sharing control with the faculty
in areas where both have a con-
cern.

Gary Jay Dorman and Thomas
Moher are running for executive
council on the "Blue Panther
Party" ticket. Like many of the
other candidates, they advocate
extension of the pass-fail option
to all courses except concentration
courses. In these courses Dorman
suggests that a pass-fail-honors
system be implemented.

Harris asks . U' to adopt
voluntary escrow fund

NEW GOVERNMENT:
LSA student body to vote for
president, executive council

"""""""""

I

BACH CLUB
presents
The Bach Club Ensemble
in its Second Annual Concert
Concertos and Sonatas for Vio-
line Flute and Piano (and or-
chestra) by J.S. Bach and R.G.
Smith
ADMISSION 75c
Sunday, Mar. 22, 3 P.M.
EAST QUAD, South Lounge
for further details see the
large ad in yesterday's DAILY

I
I

(Conitinued from Page 1?
explains. "We combine applica-
tion fees with the damage deposit,
as well as with a guarantee of,
fulfillment of the contract."
And he feels students are satis-
fied with the current process.
"There have not been two com-
plaints on o u r damage deposit
system in the four years I've been
here," he says.
Peldkamp says that the effect
of the ordinance on the private
housing market in Ann Arbor -
a factor which affects University
housing - is his biggest concern.
Under the new ordinance the
landlord is paid a sum not to ex-
ceed $25 from the deposit if he
files a verified written statement
with the clerk that at the termi-

nation of the lease, he has "in-
curred expense for the cleaning
of the premises." Payments of ov-
er $25 are settled in Small Claims
Court.'
The new ordinance will be re-
viewed next fall, Harris says, "to
determine whether we should go
to a mandatory ordinance" which
would compel the landlord either
to eliminate damage deposits or to
use the city escrow fund.
A representative of the Washte-
naw County Legal Aid Clinic not-
ed at the council meeting that the
city has authority to make the
escrow provisions mandatory, and
City Attorney Jerold Lax s a i d'
state law appears to allow it, but
added, "the language is sketchy."

Apply for Student-Faculty Committees in the Ed. School:

On the chief thrust of their
campaigns, the two "Blue Pan-
ther" candidates differ. While
Dorman favors an emphasis on
curriculum reform. Moher feels the
new government should be used to
obtain for students an increased
voice in literary college decision-
making
Several candidates for the ex-
ecutive council are also running
independently. Ken Lasser says his
primary goal would be to set up
the new government. If this is
done, he says, "it would go a long
way toward creating a newdefini-
tion in the college involving large
numbers of students."
But he also believes that t h e
matter of re-definition involves
University-wide policies which, he
says, must be changed.
"Is it not acceptable, for exam-
ple, to evaluate a student on the
basis of grades and tests," he
says.
Andy Weissman believes s t u-
dents should pay moredattention
to the realities involved in gain-
ing curriculum changes. Thus he
considers student input in decis-
sion-making somewhat secondary'.,
"Curricular changes are pri-
mary," he says. "So if the atmos-
phere among the faculty is good
for change, then we should pass
The American Friend
{.a Quoker-,founded non-profit 9r(
WILL HOLD ON-CA
WEDNESDAY,)
of the SUMMER PL
21.2 SAB (do

up the structural changes in de-
cision-making and concentrate on
the problems.
Robert Schwartz favors a limit-
ed program of reform through
"research and participation." But ,
chiefly, he says, "the LSA execu-
tive council should not be politi-
cal, it should win respect, and
should not be elitist."
He says he supports student par-
ity on tenure committees and the
entrance of the University into
the Ann Arbor housing market,
and favors the continuation of
grades with some modification.
Academics and politics are the
two areas Gene Kallenberg says
he is most concerned with. "What
I want to see is a University
where students. can come and
learn to create individually," he
says.
To accomplish this, he proposes
a free semester in which each
student is given 15 hpurs credit
and is allowed to do what he
wants.
Ann Grover, running for execu-
tive council independently, says
that the "primary concern of the
LSA student government should be
academic reform within the col-
lege since no other student organ-
ization is involved in it."
She proposes a system of "pass-
wipe out": if a student fails such
a course, no record is made of the
grade.
Forming the new government is
the top priority for Rebecca
Schenck, who believes, that stud-
ents must become involved on
both the departmental level and
on the school-wide level.
"My idea of the University is
something like a community," she
says. "But there must be some
kind of consideration of propor-
tional representation. On commit-
tees, for example, some considera-
tion, of the number of students
and facult yat the University must
be made.
Finally, Gary Kravitz basis his
campaign on the need to extend
the, pass-fail option to all courses
being used to fulfill a student's
distribution requirement.

aded th anugei sech.

i

1) Graduate Committee
2 Undergraduate Committee
3) Research Committee
4) Executive Committee
Open to grads, undergrads, and LS&A
students in the Ed. School
Applications qtnd info-Rm.,2011 Ed. 'School
APPLICATION DEADLINE-MARCH 30

c IIR1CIL IFIBOOIKS'6
Zen, Yoga, Tarot4
Alchemy, Astrology, Theosophy
Tarot, Magic, Parapsychology
Macrobiotics and Health Fo6ds
215 S. STATE ...2nd Floor
10 A.M.-8:30 P.M. 769-1583

GET
ATTENTION

PAID POLITICAL ADVERTISEMENT
MEMBER-AT-LARGE CANDIDATES
FOR SGC ELECTION
Continued from Previous Page

Is Service Committee
roup for service and social chane)
MPUS INTERVIEWS
MARCH 25, 9-5
.ACEMENT OFFICE
wnstairs) for:
PEACE & COMMUNITY

SUMMER

Fred,
Vogel

1. THE UNIVERSITY AS A POSITIVE SOCIAL FORCE.
* Principle: The University maintains a "neutrality" while
serving society. I believe the University should instead act as a
formal force for social change. ! Actions: 1. Rights of Univer-
sity-owned shares , should be exercised to make corporations
more responsive tolsociety. 2. The use of University facilities for
recruitment by corporations, if considered a privilege, can be
a means of influencing corporate activities: Recruitment could
be denied to those corporations whose operations are proven to
be significantly detrimental to society. A judicial body com-
posed of students and faculty would make such a determination
through a fair and impartial hearing.
2. THE PURPOSE OF SGC: 1. The long range goal of SGC
is the achieve self-determination of students over their own
affairs. 2. As a crucial step in this direction, I support the ap-
proval of the Regental By-Laws, as they stand. 3. While work-
ing towards this goal, SGC must protect student interests,
particularly in the following:
3. BLACK STUDENT ADMISSIONS -. We are in a
society whose greatest evil is the perpetuation of racism. This
University has more international students than black students.
although 18 per cent of the state of Michigan is black. The
University claims to support increased black admissions, if only
they could find the money. * To me, the increased admission
of black students is of the highest priority, to be funded before
money is allocated to virtually anything else. 9 SGC must make
it clear to the Regents that nothing short of complete imple-
mentation of the BAM demands will be accepted by the student
body. This is one issue that cannot be compromised.
4. HOUSING,- @ The University Housing Office should
be directly accountable to the students, through SGC. 0 No
housing construction is even planned by the University. This is
nartially thefauton f the Legaislature- which insists that housing

Additional Candidates for Member
at-Large, not listed here, include:
enry Cly
Al Warringlon
POLLING PLACES
and-TIMESE
from 9;A.M. to 5 P.M.
The Michigan Union
The Diag
Fishbowl
UGLI
North Campus Bus Stop-near Nat.
Science Musuem
The following dorms will be open for voting
during meal hours only:
Markley Hall
South Quad
East Quad
Bursley Hall
Alice Lloyd Hall
Ce I y

You can't recommend
the best lodging
in Ann Arbor...
until you've visited
the Campus Inn.
CA P U S
i ! ANN ARBOR'S
FINEST MOTOR HOTE

mlh.

'pf

(caravans, group proiects, placements)
COMMUNITY SERVICE IN LATIN AMERICA
OVERSEAS (E. & W. EUROPE, etc.) WORKCAMPS
Some aid availa oprojects that cost. Applications welcomed
from everyone. Those interested may rgister with Mrs. Cooper at
the Placement Service (764-7460) or just drop by. Information
and applications blso available weekdays at the AFSC office
(1414 Hill; 761-8283).
THINK
about Students
THINK
about the
ENS IAN
BUY IT NOW.

EL

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Street -769-2200J

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