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March 19, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-19

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ANN ARBOR BLACK THEATRE, Inc.
PRESENTS
3ONE-ACT PLAYS,
"A SON COME HOME" and
"CLARA'S OLE MAN"
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MARCH 18-21-8 P.M.
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General Public $3.00-Students $2.00
TICKETS AVAjILABLE at Discount Record Shop on State St.,
Centicore Bookstore, Ned's Bookstore, Ypsilanti, and at the door.

SDS: A
By RICK PERLOFF
Spring, 1969: Students -for a Demo-
cratic Society holds sleepy meetings
and is relatively uninvolved in campus
political actions. Outsiders wonder if
the organization has vanished.
Spring, 1970: SDS has increased its
membership to over 100 persons, has
organized a major drive against cor-
poration recruiters, and has become
the most visible student group on cam-
pus.
Why has the organization grown so
substantially? Why is it attracting so
many wavering radicals?
Karl Parris, a Residential College
freshman, joined SDS because "they're
the most right-on group at the mo-
ment. SDS is the only group pushing
things."
"Things" include demonstrations

haven

for

wavering'

against recruiters-which seem to oc-
cur almost daily-participation in the
march to the County Bldg. after the
conference on repression, and the
demonstration after the Chicago con-
spiracy trial verdict. All of which give
the group continuing exposure to radi-
cals looking for commitment.
And, for many it seems that SDS
is the only group to which they would
seriously consider devoting their com-
mitment.
"Radical Caucus kind of died," ex-
plains one former caucus member now
in SDS. The caucus suffered from a
lack of interest on the part of many
of its members and a general disillu-
sionment as to what the caucus could
organize.
"I can't take the International So-
cialist line, that they see themselves

continually organizing people and not
taking concerted action," Paris adds.
He ruled out IS too because he like
many others, believes it is involved
too much in "theoretical raps. I didn't
want to argue with them."
In addition, "Resistance and WSA
(Workers -Student Alliance) were
never around," he says. "New Mobe
and Student Mobilization didn't center
on campus problems. And I wasn't
going to go to work with Student
Government Council."
So SDS was the only radical group
left chosen by a process of elimination.
Yet SDS' rise does not stem from
merely negative reasons. The group
has undertaken a number of activities
it hoped would increase its exposure
around the University.
For example, it initiated collectives

-small groups ranging froma
to 20 persons which discuss id
and tactical approaches toa
and the development of a
radical consciousness.
"Last spring the group w
isolated," explains R a n d i
another SDS member. "I did
I was very much of a par
Now there's less time spent
impersonal mass meetings ar
time is spent in small groups
are going to stay in an orga
where they can talk in small
Clarke says the collectives
are groups in East Quad, Sout
and Bursley as well as severE
collectives-were initiated af
ROTC issue last fall. "Ther
feeling we had to talk in differ
~aitii

radicals
about 10 of organizing in an on-going way and
eological not in a crisis to crisis way."
an issue Another factor in SDS's growth is
person's its increased publicity.
An example is "Up Against the Wall
vas very Street Journal." a newspaper written
Clarke. largely by SDS members which dis-
dn't feel cuses both national and campus is-
ticipant. sues. The paper was initiated about
in large six weeks ago and is involved with
nd more issues ranging from ecology to de-
s. People mands of the Black Action Movement.
nization SDS leaflets may also be a factor
groups." in the increase of new members. Not
- there only are the leaflets more numerous
th Quad, but they also appear more creative
al street than in the past. A leaflet calling on
[ter the people to attend a protest against the
General Electric Co. mimicked the
e was a company by saying "At GE. profit is
ent ways our most important product."
NER S PHONE: 764-05524
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

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page three

Thursday, March 19, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I

the
news today
by T he Associated Press and College Press Service

General

0

0

a

WEEK
3RD.

dam DIAL
8-6416

NOMI1NATED FOR '
5 ACADEMY AWARDS INCLUDING
Best picture

NEW YORK LETTER CARRIERS, DEFYING FEDERAL LAW,
struck for higher pay yesterday in Manhattan and the Bronx.
The walkout quickly spread to Long Island and Paterson, N.J.
and all mail services to and from the cities came to an abrupt halt.
Federal Judge Inzer B. Wyatt ordered the post office workers
back to work late yesterday afternoon.
Indications were that the strikers would ignore the back-to-work
injunction. "The men I spoke to will defy any injunction. They will
stay out until hell freezes over," said Herman Sandbank, an officer
of the letter carriers union.
* * *
LIMITED WITHDRAWAL of civilians and soldiers from Lao-
tian army headquarters began yesterday after the fall of a U.S.-
operated supply base at Sam Thong.
Informed sources considered the advance by 2,000 North Viet-
namese Troops to Sam Thong to be the first significant North Viet-
namese push south of the Plain of Jars since the 1962 Geneva Agree-
ment which set up Laos as a neutral state.
Sam Thing is 15 miles southwest of the Plain of Jars and 10
miles northwest of Long Cheng where Gen. Vang Peo commands
7,000 Meo tribesmen.
Pao had his soldiers in the way of an advance but apparently they
put up little resistance at Sam Thong, sources said.
There was no immediate report on whether 'U.S. Central Intelli-
gence Agency personnel, who support Vang's army at Long Cheng,
had left.
WEST GERMAN CHANCELLOR WILLY BRANDT, travelled
to Erfurt, East Germany last night in an unprecedented meeting
with East Germany's Premier Willi Stoph.
It is the first time in the history of the two German states that
a West German chancellor had set foot on Eastern soil.
At his departure, Brandt said, "Let us hope that Erfurt is a be-;
ginning. But once again I repeat: No one should harbor false hopes."
He indicated that the reunification of Germany was not on the
agenda.
- * *

-Associated Press

Mail carriers strike

New York City letter carriers shout as they strike yesterday for higher pay. The Manhattan
strike, in defiance of federal anti-strike laws, could cripple postal communications in the down-
town district.

15,358 STUDENTS:
Literary college enrollment
drops 623 from fall semester

"THE LAST WORD IN THRILLERS,
TERRIFIC!",
-GENE SHALIT, Look Magazine

resigns in
My Lai suit
West Point head
quits on charges
of nieglect of duty
WASHINGTON ()- Secre-
tary of the Army Stanley R.
Resor announced yesterday
the appointment of Maj. Gen.
William A. Knowlton as West
Point superintendent to re-
place Maj. Gen. Samuel W.
Koster. Koster is charged with
dereliction of duty in connec-
tion with an investigation re-
leased Tuesday of thealleged
My Lai massacre in 1968.
The appointment of Knowlton,
formerly a secretary of the Army
general staff, was announced af-
ter changes against Koster and 13
other officers were made public.
Koster, who was charged with
"failure to obey lawful regula-
tions" as well as dereliction of
duty, called his cadets to forma-
tion at West Point yesterday to
say he had requested reassign-
ment to keep publicity away from
the academy.
The fourteen army officers were
charged with such offenses as
false swearing, failure to report
possible misconduct, making false
official statements, and other
equally serious offenses.
The charges resulted from a
14-week Pentagon study of whe-
ther the Army adequately investi-
gated or tried to cover up th e
alleged masacre of South V i e t-
namese citizens by American sold-
iers in March, 1968.
Lt. Gen. William R. Peers, head
of a special panel investigating
the case, said Tuesday that there
were "serious deficiencies" in the
performance of many officers who
hold staff and command positions
in the units which were involved
in U.S. operations around My Lai.
Peers said that the inquiry,
which heard 400 witnesses and re-
corded 20,000 pages of testimony,
"clearly established that a trag-
edy of major proportions" occur-
red at My Lai.
Grand jury-type formal investi-
gations Will now be held to decide
whether the officers should be
court martialed.
Army officials said Koster will
sserve as assistant to Lt. Gen.
Jonathan Seaman who is 1st Army
commander at Fort Meade, Md.
Most of the 14 officers.charged
are to be transferred there.

I

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SENATE BACKERS OF. JUDGE G. HARROLD CARSWELL
said yesterday that he will easily win confirmation to the.
Supreme Court despite withdrawal of Judge Elbert P. Tuttle's
support.
Tuttle is the retired chief judge of the federal appeals court in
New Orleans, of which Carswell is a member.
Assistant Republican leader, Sen. Robert P. Griffin, R.-Mich., said
"It doesn't help when a distinguished and respected jurist like Judge
Tuttle withdraws his support." But, ,he added, that at least 60 votes
will be cast in confirmation of Carswell.
"There is not enough to change the situation away from
confirmation," said Sen. Mark O. Hatfield, R-Ore.
H. RAP BROWN'S TRIAL on charges of arson and inciting
to riot was transferred to its third successive site yesterday by
Judge Harry E. Dyer Jr., who disqualified himself a day after the
prosecutor asked him to do so.
Dyer said he was persuaded to leave the case by the prosecutor,
William B. Yates, who expressed concern that the judge had pre-
judiced the case by statements to the news media.
No new date has been set for the resumption of the trial.
Join The Daily. The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of

Literary c o 11 e g e enrollment
dropped by 623 from the fall term
to the current semester, with the
bigest enrollment decline of any
college department.
The present LSA enrollment is
15,358; last semester it was 16,-
081. The figure is also 194 less
than a year ago.
LSA Dean William Hays said
some drop in enrollment always
occurs between fall and winter
semesters, and that the literary
college's decline may be greater
because its curriculum is m o r e
flexible than -that of the other
schools and colleges.
In general, however, enrollment
remained quite stable. Total en-
rollment is now 36,397, 1,931 less
than last semester but 467 more
than a year ago. Of this enroll-
ment, 21,928 are men and 14,469
are women.
. Ann Arbor campus enrollment
is 30,389, up 713 from a year ago.
Flint College had the largest in-
crease, up 276 from last year to a
current enrollment of 1,505.
Other current enrollment fig-
ures, including both graduate and
undergraduate students are: ar-
chitecture and design college, 850,
down 47 from the fall semester
and up 71 from a year ago, busi-
ness administration school, 1,057,
five more than last semester and
up 84 from last winter Dearborn

Campus, 816, down four from the
fall and up 24 from last year,
dentistry school, 598, down 17
from the fall and up 39 from last
year,
Enrollment in the education
school is currently 3,306, d o w n
from 3,376 in the fall and up from
3,208 a year ago; the engineering
college is at 3,858, down from 4,-
357 in the falli and 3,976 a year
ago; law school, 1,000, down from

1,054 in the fall and 1,011 a year
ago; medical school, 1,767, down
from 1,787 in the fall and up from
1,718 a year ago; and music
school, 803,down from 859 in the
fall and 821 a year ago.
Enrollment in the natural re-
sources school is currently 488,
down from 505 in the fall and up
from 457 a y e a r ago; nursing
school, 793, down from 838 in the
fall and up from 786 a year ago.

U.S. Steel indicted
on pollution charges

;I

Sports StaffY

11

HELD OVER-2nd EXCITING WEEK

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11

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CROSBY,
STILLS,
NASH
and YOUNG
"DeJ a-yu"
New Album
SPECIAL
S2QR '

I'''I

Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

WASHINGTON (R) - The U.S.
Steel Corp. and one of its plant
managers were indicted by a fed-
eral grand jury yesterday on
charges of polluting Lake Michi-
gan.
Atty. Gen. John N. Mitchell said
the huge steel firm was charged
in five counts of an indictment
returned in Chicago federal court.
In a separate county, Charles
Kay, superintendent of Big Steel's
South Works facility in Chicago,
was accused of aiding and abet-
ting in the deposit of solid wastes
into the lake.

TATE

HELD OVER!
2nd WEEK
SHOWS AT:
1 :00-3:00-5:00
7:00 & 9:10 P.M.

The indictment alleged that the
plant discharged iron oxide and
other blast furnace waste solids
from the steel, manufacturing pro-
cess into the lake.-
If convicted, U.S. Steel could
receive a maximum fine of $2,500
for each of the five counts. Kay
could receive the same fine as
well as up to one year in prison.
The action marked the second
time this year that U.S. Steel has
f been charged with polluting navi-
gable waters in the Lake Michigan
area.

11

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NOMINATED FOR 9 ACADEMY AWARDS

"BEST
PICTURE
OF THE YEAR"
-National Boord
of Review
Imm - - -

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* "rn FOII R SPD ND AN : !It

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