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March 18, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SATURDAY, MARCH 21
8:30 P.M.-FORD AUDITORIUM
CLANCY BROTHERS.
"Minstrels of the Emerald Isles"
Tickets: $5.50, 4.50, 3.50, 2.50
Available at Ford Aud., all metropolitan Grinnell stores, J.L. Hud-
son stores, Wayne State Univ. ticket office. Mail orders, should
send self-addressed stamped envelope.
S N F TH EATRE PRR
TONIGHT AT 8:30!
tNY. Drama Critics Circle Award 1968 -

the
n ews to day
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

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Sitiii~an

a-d6xtty

SEASON'S

OUR
THE
NEW
ROCK
MUSICAL

BEST MUSICAL
"BRIGHTES FRES
NEW MESTCA L COEHS
IN A L pj0 I MEDy
"Richar Wa e 1
SISSEERFUL 'OFN. i t
FULLY IRREVELREN
AS TODAgYt AMERN
ojj? a r " i l
MARCH 18 - 19
ADVANCE TICKETS
PTP Ticket Office

CAMBODIAN NAVY TUGS yesterday towed the American
munitions freighter Columbia Eagle into harbor waters and
political asylum was granted to two seamen who allegedly seized
the ship last Saturday.
The two seamen reportedly forced the ammunition carrier into
harbor at gunpoint as an anti-war protest.
The head of the United States mission in Phnom Penh, the
capital of Cambodia, has met, with Foreign Ministry officials to dis-
cuss thenrelease of the ship, which was carrying over 5,000 tons of
bombs and other munitions to Thailand.
Fourteen crewmen remain on the ship. The other 24 crew mem-
bers were picked up Monday after they were set adrift.
PRESIDENT NIXON yesterday freed $1.5 billion in federal
and state funds to stimulate the housing industry.
Saying that the nation is moving back toward stable prices, Nixon
lifted his anti-inflationary freeze on federal-state funds for schools,
hospitals, roads and other public projects.
At the same time, he asked for a series of actions by Congress
and federal agencies to spur lagging home building and hinted that
the Federal Reserve Board should loosen money supplies.
SOUTH VIETNAMESE ARTILLERY yesterday went to the
aid of Cambodian soldiers attempting to drive Viet Cong from
their soil.
United States officials said that it was a purely l6cal decision and
did not need Saigon's approval. Sources reported that a Cambodian
officer asked a South Vietnam province chief for the artillery support
in pushing the Viet Cong across the Cambodian border.
This action represent an unprecedented Cambodian-South Viet-
namese cooperation against the Viet Cong, said U.S. officials. Aerial
observers reported that at least five Viet Cong were killed.
* * *
ABOUT 20 PEOPLE were killed and over 100 injured in India
yesterday as supporters of feuding political parties clashed vio-
lently in the streets.'
Armed with bombs, spears, knives and axes, mobs battled while
supporters of the Marxist Communist Party attempted to enforce a
general strike called to protest the fall of the West Bengal State
government.
The Marxist Communist Party had previously dominated the
coalition government of West Bengal which collapsed last Monday.
Observers believed that the Indian government would likely im-
pose New Delhi's administration on the strife-ridden state until an-
other coalition could be formed.
FOURTEEN ARMY OFFICERS, including the superintendent
at West Point, yesterday were charged with military violations in
connection with the alleged massacre at Song My.
The charges, ranging from dereliction of duty to false swearing, _
were the outgrowth of a 14-week Pentagon probe of whether the Army
adequately investigated or tried to cover up the alleged mass killings
of South Vietnamese civilians by American soldiers in March, 1968.
MILITANT FARMERS hoping to drive up prices yesterday
decided to send all of their Idaho potatos to starch plants instead
of dinner tables.
A National Farm Workers Organization spokesman said the tactic
would allow a four-weeklold holding action to continue "indefinitely."
The campaign is aimed at driving up prices paid by firms which
dominate the growers' market - firms which package and resell both
fresh and converted potatos

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page three
Wednesday, March 18, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three
ABOR TION LAW

urges

retort

5 Academy Award
Nominations
including
Best Picture

-Associated Press

UMW hearing witness

George L. Judy, former trustee of the United Mine Workers retirement fund, testified before a Senate
subcommittee hearing yesterday concerning charges that UMW President Tony Boyle misused the
funds.

U bil
From Wire Service Reports
Gov. William Milliken gave
a boost to chances for abortion
reform in Michigan yesterday
when he announced his sup-
port for a sweeping reform of
the current abortion laws.
Milliken said he would support
legislation allowing the abortion
decision to be made by the preg-
nant woman and her qualified, li-
censed physician, if the abortion
would occur in the first three
months of pregnancy, or after
three months only under excep-
tional conditions.
Milliken would further ask that
a three-month residency require-
ment be included in the bill, along
with the provision that the 'opera..
tion take place in a hospital, olin-
Ic, or other facility licensed, certi-
fled, and inspected by the state
Department of Public Health.
For unmarried"women-under18,
consent for an abortion would
have to be secured from a parent
or legal guardian.
Current state law allows term-
ination of pregnancy only when
the life of the mother in endang-
ered.
"It is necessary to act at this
time so that lives can besaved,
and much suffering can be pre-
vented and the illegal abortion
trade can be stopped," the gov-
ernor said. "I believe that women
should be able to make an in-
dividual judgment and that the
result of this Judgment should be
respected and protected by 'law."
Milliken's plan would include
provisions that no physician or
hospital staff member would be
compelled to assist in an abortion
operation against his conscience.
Several abortion reform propos-
als, including one that spells out
nearly all of the governor's re-
quirements, are pending in the
Senate Committee on Health, Soc-
ial Services, and Retirement, head-
ed by Sen. N. Lorraine Beebe (R-
Dearborn), an ardent backer of
abortion reform.
Sen. Beebe could not be reached
yesterday to comment on the ef-
fect Milliken's stand could have
on the legislative action.
In support of the abortion re-
form movement, hundreds of
housewives from all major cities in
the Lower Peninsula are expected
to converge on Lansing this morn-
ing.
Some will participate in what
they call a "dignified walk" around
the capitol, while others w ill
buttonhole their legislators an d
ask them to take a liberal stand
on the abortion issue.
In a related development, the
New YorkState Senate is Sched-
uled to open debate today on an
abortion reform bill which, like
the proposed Michigan bill, make
abortion a private matter to 'be
decided by the woman and her
physician. According toobservers
in Albany, the bill hassnely
enough support for passage.

funds.

'EEKS STATE CONTROL.

Senator proposes'amendment
to end 'U' financial autonomy

GP Now at the CAMPUS Theatre
DIAL 8-6416

Proposede ResoUion For Consideration By Black
Staff and Faculty
A group of Black Faculty and Staff members who met at the Michigan Union on Monday,
March 16, are greatly disturbed at the impending impasse between the University Admin-
istration and the Black Action Movement regarding the Black Student Demands. It would
be most unfortunate if the discussions that have been held so far were to break down over
issues which appear to us to be easily resolved.
1. We suggest that a distinction be made between admissions policy on the one hand
and financial assistance to Black students on the other, It is unfortunate that the
Administration has always sought to deal with these issues jointly. We suggest that
the University could and should constitute 10% of the student body enrolled at the
University by 1973-74.
2. With regard to financial assistance, we suggest that the University provide total fi-
nancial assistance to Black students when needed, and partial financial assistance
where warranted. In other words we are suggesting adequate financial assistance
based on the particular Black student needs. In this connection, we suggest thej
creation of a Financial Task Force, comprised of Black staff and students, to be
created with the specific task of identifying financial resources within the Univer-
sity to support the Black students enrolled.
3. We urge the University to respond specifically as to the exact nature of its commit-
ment to all the programs menioned in the BAM proposal.
We the undersigned, wish to indicate our strong support for the BAM requests which call
for greater Black enrollment and increased services. As members of the University, we
strongly urge the Administration to respond to the BAM proposal with urgency.
SIGNATURES:

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A state senator has proposed an
amendment to the state consti-
tution which would remove the
inancial autonomy of t h e gov-
erning boards of s t a t e colleges
and universities.
The proposed amendment would
make the boards "answerable to
the state Legislature," according
to Sen. Stanley Rozycki (D-De-
troit) who introduced the measure
Monday.
The governing board at t h e
University is the Regents.
The section of the constitution
which entitles the boards to fi-
nancial autonomy states that
'each board shall have general
supervision of its institution and
the control and direction of all
expenditures from the institution's
funds."
Specifically, t h e amendment,
which came in the form of a joint
resolution, adds t h e words "as

provided by law" to Section 6, Ar-
ticle 8 of the constitution.
This section stipulates that "in-
stitutions of higher education es-
tablished by law having authority
to grant baccalaureate degrees
shall each be governed by a board
of control which shall be a body
corporate."
Rozycki explained that t h e
amendment would allow "the Leg-
islature to step in and give a di-
rective" t'o the boards.
He said he introduced the meas-
ure because he was concerned
about a lack of fiscal responsibil-
ity at state universities as well as
boards' capitulation to students
and faculty members.
"Everybody seems to be running
the universities except the admin-
istration," Rozycki said.
The resolution is now before the
Senate's state actions committee,
Rozycki would not predict when

the measure would be reported out
of committee,
Meanwhile, state Rep. Jacide
Vaughn III (D-Detroit) is explor-
ing the possibility of proposing
an amendment which would add
students to governing bodies in all
state-supported, colleges and uni-
versities.
He is holding public hearings all
over the state before introducing
the bill.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning, Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

1 -.0

Rozycki would not predict when

U OF M MENS 8:30 P.M.
G L E E C L U B TICKET SALES AT HILL BOX OFFICE
A P R I L 3 H I Block Ticket Sales March 24-26
L L A U D I TO R I General Ticket Sales March 30-April 3
U M U 0 F M Tickets Prices: $3, $2.50, $2
M ENIS G L E E C MAIL ORDERS TO:
LU B APR L 3 UofMMensGleeClub
6048 Administration Bldg.
HILL AUDITORI Ann Arbor,Mich. 48104
U M U O F M PHONE 764-7265

Paul 0. Pryor, Purchasing
Jessica A. Pryor, Housing
Willie Smith, Student Affairs
Raleigh Morgan, Romance Languages
Gloria Marshall, Anthropology
Richard Ross, Education
Robert Hayden, English
John McAdoo, Public Health
Harriett McAdoo, Education
Joseph Price, Educations

Wade Ellis, Associate Dean, Graduate School
Tssau Jackson, Afro-American Studies
Thomas A. Gordon, Afro-American Studies
Nellie Varner, Political Science
Donald R. Deskins, Jr., Geography
William Suttles, History
Leroy A. Williams, University Housing
Bernard Sims, Pharmacy
Evelyn Moore, Education
L _ 3 . "1 s.. *. e.

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THE

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presents
BAND

Saturday, March 21, 8:30 p.m.
*I A I r in ", 1 1"

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