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January 13, 1970 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-13

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3, 9ao

THE MICHIGAtJ DAISY

Poae Nine

13, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-

joel block -
Whatis worse than

I

two Big Ten refs?

"Big Al" Kaufman once joked that the only thing worse
than two Big Ten referees were three of 'em.
Those of you who endured last Saturday's Michigan-Purdue
basketball game know that "Big Al" wasn't just joking.
(Those of you who don't know who "Big Al" is, shouldn't
worry; he tells lousy jokes.)
The traveling call against Rick Bloodworth in the final
a seconds of regulation time was incredibly abominable.
It was that sort of blind call, and many others I've seen in
the last couple seasons, which made me seriously doubt the
wisdom of the Big Ten's unique switch to three referees.
I remember a Big Ten basketball press dinner two years ago
just after the conference passed the three-ref rule. Herm Rohrig,'
supervisor of Big Ten officials, was at the mike explaining the
, change in officiating.
Sure, Herm said, the calls will be more accurate with an-
other ref on the floor.
No, Herm protested, there won't be any more confusion on
the court.
Well, you were wrong, Herb.
The piumerous Instances of refs screening refs on calls, of
coritradictory calls by two and sometimes all three refs, and,
(most horrendous of all), of refs blowing the goal tend whistle
on legitimately blocked shots, have illustrated to Events Build-
ing inhabitants that three refs don't make it.
When the Big Ten gets together this March, they'll prob-
ably talk about mundane topics like repealing the no-repeat
rule on the Rose Bowl. There's another rule they should consider:
Two's company, three's a hell of a lot of refs.

By ELLIOT LEGOW
Michigan's basketball t
will try to get back in the
ning groove tonight as the
verines travel to Columb
take on the Buckeyes of
State.
The Wolverines c u r r ex
stand 1-2 in Big Ten play,
dropping their last two g
to Iowa and Purdue. If I
igan hopes to get back int
title picture it will need
this week against two p
title contenders, Ohio State
Illinois.
The Buckeyes who rats
one of the nation's most
rate field goal shooters,

game

faces

cagers

in

-TODAY-
BASKETBALL-at Ohio State, 7:30 p.m.
-WEDNESDAY-
GYMNASTICS-at Eastern Michigan, 7:30 p.m.
-FRIDAY-
HOCKEY-Michigan Tech at Colesium, 8:00 p.m.
SWIMMING-Toronto at Matt Mann Pool, 7:30 p.m.
-SATURDAY-
BASKETBALL-Iinois at Events Building, 2:00 p.m.
HOCKEY-Michigan Tech at Colesium, 8:00 p.m.
WRESTLING--at Eastern Michigan, 2:00 p.m.
GYMNASTICS-Western Michigan and Illinois, Chicago Branch
at Kalamazoo, 2:00 p.m.
Even the hippies speak
ighly of Ann Arbor
Banks special check

Columbus

BOTTM
OF THE FIFTH

a

Jim Forrester

The practice of
amateur professioal ism,
Well, sports fans you may not have thought it possible, but the
NCAA is managing to abort itself again, this time in its meetings in
Washington D.C.-a town that is sort of a national capital in this
respect. :
The eye-catcher is the 11 game schedule. Rue the day when a
team can be six games out of first and still have a chance at the
championship. Already the bowl games extend into the middle of
January, blurring the eyes of many a fan. "The Bowery Boys Face
Death" had a better TV rating than the Mineral Water Bowl.
The real worry, though, is recruiting violations. Next to gambling,
recruiting violations are the bane of every collegiate athletic official.
In fact, it is so much on their minds they bust what intellect is avail-
able to them in trying to out violate each other.
The latest bit of recruiting cleverness involves Florida State's
basketball coach, Hugli Durham. Durham dug up some business in
which "a representative of the university's athletic interests has con-
siderable-holdings" (according to the NCAA Council) to improve his
program for procuring athletes. Three prospects were flown to and
from the organization's headquarters where they received the full
wining and dining treatment.f
All this to pbtain basketball players.
The concern, of course, is that if too many goodies go under
the table then college athletes will be looked upon as (shudder) pro-
fessionals. What if they couldn't compete in that paragon of amateur-
ism, the Olympic Games? The event is too horrible for the NCAA to
contemplate.
Rejection of these phony ideas of amateurism would go a long
way in eliminating recruiting violations. The players should simply
be paid according to their worth in entertainment dollars. End the
violatioins by ending the rules that are their cause.
This, admittedly, would squeeze more than a few colleges out
of the athletic entertainment field. "Let's go Blue" wouldn't have
as much behind it. But if athletes are playing for pay, to generate
revenue,.admit it-don't waste time and money upholding idiotic rules
* and regulations.
If any of this came about, the colleges would likely set up a
"High School Draft," where top talent would be spread fairly evenly
and. salaries to athletes could be kept minimal. Sort of the way the
pros do things.
This too is reprehensible. Pay a man what he is worth on the free
market. If we're stuck with capitalism, then carry it to its logical
extent. The thousands of dollars Cazzie Russell brought into the
University would be better off in his pocket than the local athletic
establishment's.
3 4

da ily
s r
NIGHT EDITOR:
LEE KIRK
pose a different type of problem
to Michigan than did Purdue.
Purdue's attack rests mainly in
one player, Rick Mount, but the
Buckeyes rely on a balanced
attack.
Three Ohio State players are
averaging over 20 points per
game' and four of their five
starters are shooting at above a
.500 average.
DAVE SORENSON, Buckeye
center, is the top scorer, aver-
aging 23 points per game. He is
an excellent shooter and a
strong rebounder. In the Buck-
eyes' loss to Illinois last Satur-
day, Sorenson was held to 11
points. Michigan will need a
strong inside defense to control
Sorenson as well as the Illini
did.
Supplementing Sorenson in
the front court is forward Jim
Cleamons, the only junior in a
starting quintet dominated by
seniors. Cleamons provides the
Buckeyes with speed, shooting
ability, and' excellentkrebound-
ing. He is the Buckeyes' top
rebounder, averaging ten per
game, and shoots at a 20 point
per game clip.
Both Cleamons and Sorenson
have compiled shooting per-
centages of over .530, but com-
pared to the performance of
guard .Jody Finney, this is only
fair aJtbest. Finney has canned
close to 60 per cent of his field
shots on the way to compiling a
21.4 scoring average.
JOINING THIS trio of 20
point per game performers in
In accordance with the Daily
Sport Staff policy of printing
all the news that fits, we will
in the future print each Tues-
day morning the score of the
Regents-Peoples Plaza game
(see today's edit page and Jan.
10 Daily), now in its fifth week.
Information supplied courtesy
of the Press Office of the Ca-
nadian Blue Panthers.
Hours Held Since Midnight,
December 6, 1969:
regents PEOPLE
102 794
Ed. Note: Jimmy The Greek
wired the Daily late last night
that he is taking the game off
the gambling boards. Said Jim-
my, "The.heat's on, and I don't
trust them Regents anyway.
I blew 50 G's on the bookstore
issue, and you know they
should have won that one."

ch.ecking
accorunts

-Daily-Thomas R.Copi
Rudy moves in to block a Boilermaker shot

BIG TEN STANDINGS

Illinois
Iowa
Michigan State
Purdue
Ohio State
Minnesota
MICHIGAN
Northwestern
Indiana
Wisconsin
the Buckeye si
guard Craig B

W L
3 0
3 0
2 0
2 1
1 1
1 1
1 2
0 2
0 3
0 3

Pet.
1.000
1.000
1.000
.667
.500
.500
.333
.000
.000
.a0a

arting lineup are
Barclay and for-

average 90 points a game they
average only 60 shots.
Illinois showed what kind of
game can beat Ohio State. The
Illini played a very tight de-
fense, forcing the Buckeyes to
take more difficult shots. As a
result Ohio State's offense was
held to 59 points and despite
the fact that Illini high-scoring
center Greg Jackson was in con-
tinual .foul trouble and failed to
score, the Buckeyes finished on
the short end of a 77-59 score.
Defense, however, has not
been the Wolverines' strong
point this season. They have
allowed over 100 points in three
games, including their last two
contests. If forced to play Ohio
State's deliberate type of game,
Michigan will be at a definite
disadvantage as the Wolverines
shooting percentage is much
lower than Ohio's .544.
ADDING TO the Wolverines'
problems is the uncertain con-
dition of starting forwards Rudy

Tomjanovich and 'Bird' Carter.
Tomjanovich played all of Sat-
urday's game with a cracked-
knee. Neither the injury nor
heavy bandaging seemed to
hamper Tomjanovich severely
as he again led the Wolverine
scoring attack.
Carter is also suffering from
a leg injury which has hindered
his play in the last several
games. Wa y ne Grablec has
spelled Carter muchof the time
and may have to do so again
tonight.

ward Dan Andreas. Although
Barclay and Andreas have low
scoring averages, they too have
deadly aim at the hoop. It won't
pay to foul the Buckeyes either
as they hit 80 per cent of their
free shots.
Ohio State's style of play is
quite different from Michigan's.
While Michigan plays a running
game and averages over 80 shots
a game, the Buckeyes play a
slower and more deliberate
game. Although the Buckeyes

BULLETIN

The NCAA announced yes-
terday that thehUniversity of
Michigan will host the 1971
national gymnastics champion-
ship. 'The announcement was
made at the NCAA convention
currently beingheld in Wash-
ington, D.C. The meet will be
held in the All Events Bldg.

ANN ARBOR BANK
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MEMBER: FEDERAL DEPOSIT 1NSURANCE CORPORATION !"FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM
order Your Daily Now--
Pone 764-0558

U

THE SELF AND THE NON-SELF:
MYSTICISM, DRUGS AND THE OCCULT
DR. JOHN POLLARD, Dept. of
Neuropsychology, U. of M.
Medical Center
DR. ARYEH STRIKOVSKY,
Prof, of Jewish Mysticism,
Detroit College of Jewish Studies
JANUARY 14-8 P.M.

The Law Club, hereby
Summons
All Campus Coeds
"''Breach thef Peace" Mixer
Thursday-Jan. 15,1970 9-11 P.M.
LAW CLUB LOUNGE

1

U

JOIN
THE DAILY,
SPORTS STAFF
BRING US
U P TO DATE
Come In Any Afternoon
420 MAYNAR D

ci
$Tz'1

Welcome
Students !

* DISTINCTIVE COLLEGIATE
HAIRSTYLING for Men
And Women-
* 8 HAIRSTYLISTS
The Dascola Barbers
Arborland-Campus
Maple Village

THE HOUSE

---1429 Hill

- ALL WELCOME

f'

I

A

ORGANIZERS MEETING
RENT STRIKE ORGANIZERS
BUILDING REPRESENTATIVES

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LT. STAUDENMAIER

on USED TEXTBOOKS

All Other Interested Persons
Tuesday, Jan. 13, 1 P.M.

MASS MEETING
WED., JAN.14

8:00 P.M.

i

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