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January 13, 1970 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-13

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Page fight'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TuesdQy, January 13, 1970

Page Eight THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, January 13, 1970

SWEEP WEEKEND SERIES:

Erratic Icers (temporarily on right track

By BILL ALTERMAN -
Theoretically, it's simple.
If you score a lot and the op-
position doesn't score at all, you
win.
Saturday the Wolverine icers
were theoretical. Or as Coach Al
Renfrew put it, Michigan "work-
ed, forechecked, skated and goal-
tended well."
They did everything in beating
Colorado College 6-0 and gained
their first series sweep.
Still it is too early to forecast
the emergence of a super power.
Michigan has been erratic a 11
season, splitting four weekend
series on route to a 7-6 record.
Their front line of Bernie Gag-
non, Brian Slack, and Paul Gams-
by has had little trouble scoring
this year, often putting in a late

game winning goal. The second
and third lines- however, weren't
clicking regularly. When t h e y
didn't, Michigan went down,
Lately, however, things h a v e
been picking up. Michigan scored
14 goals last weekend, although
the first line got only three. Right
now, as far as Coach Renfrew
is concerned, there is no f ir s t
string. Not only will they score
more, but if this continues, he
can alternate the players at will,
allowing everyone a chance to rest.
The most satisfying perform-
ance of the weekend was doubtless
turned in by goalie Karld Bagnell.
After giving up seven goalsin Fri-
day's 8-7 victory, Bagnell blanked
them Saturday, his first shutout of
the season.
Indeed Friday the Wolverines

were lucky to win. Although they
looked rather ragged all night,
they had what appeared to be a
comfortable 8-5 margin going into
the last three minutes of play.
Then Colorado wing B ill Bal-
drica hammered in two goals in
the space of fourteen seconds nar-
rowing the difference to one. In
the last few seconds Colorado got
the puck down close again, just
missing the tieing goal. ;
Michigan's eighth and winning
score was the result of dumb luck.
An errant shot by Paul Gamsby
hit the skate of Colorado defense-
man Bob Langin and bounded in-
to the net.
Saturday Colorado only got off
17 shots as the icers forechecked
superbly. Until now, however, Bag-
nell had been allowing a rather
high average of 4.1 goals per game.
WCHA STANDINGS

One problem did appear out of '
Saturday's game. Forward Doug
Heyliger severely injured his knee
and appears to have had it for
the year.
However, if Michigan can con
tinue to skate well and if Bagnell ''.<
can match the job done last year
by goalie Jim Keough, -the Wol-
verines could conceivably emerge:
as WCHA champions. As they
showed Saturday they qre capable
of superb performances.:
Part of the problem facing;
Michigan this year is increasing
quality of play throughout t h e
WCHA. Teams like Wisconsin,:
which gave the Wolverines little
trouble last year, have improved '>/
considerably. In fact only t w o
games separate the second placeĀ«
team (MSU from the eighth place
team (Wisconsin). ':>: <:>.:"
Although both of the g a m e s
against Colorado were at home
for the Wolverines, that seemed to :
be an irrelevant factor. "Norm-
ally," Renfrew commented, "the
home team has an advantage.
This year is doesn't seem to make
any difference." 'Ill' goalie Bagn
When asked how he gets his-
team up for a game Renfrew could
only shrug and wonder "if only a.Y A 1THLETES
coach knew."
- AA re

PLEASE NOTE PRICE CHANGE!

Minnesota
MSU
Michigan Tech
MICHIGAN
Duluth
Denver
North Dakota
Wisconsin
Colorado

W
8
4
2
6
5
4
8
4
0

L
2
2
1
4
5
5
10
6
6

T
0
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
0

Pct.
.800
.667
.625
.600
.500
.450
.444
.400
.000

-Daiy-Thomas R. Copi
eli working a shutout

0]

SKI

CL

MASS MEETING

Tues.,

Jan. 13th

I

T O I T!
7:00, Union Ballroom
*

NEW YORK (A) - Former
Olympic champion Harold Con-
, olly recommended Monday sweep-
ing track and field changes in the
Amateur Athletic Union, includ-
ing more financial help for ath-
letes and clubs.
Connolly, 38, and a gold medal
winner in the hammer throw at
the 1956 Olympic Games, repre-
sents a group which he says num-
Madon-Meeting House
S A OF4
DIVERSITY
TRAVELOGUE
MORDECHAI EIDELS
TEACHING FELLOW,
SPEECH DEPT.
Tues., an. 13, 8 p.m.
at The Huse-1429 Hill

berg more than 100 of America's
top track and field stars.
"The whole thing came about
at Lake Tahoe," Connolly s a i d.
"We athletes discussed our trip
to Europe last year in which t h e
track team had .poor housing and
meals among other things."n
Other improvements or chang-
es that Connolly seeks are-
-Returning a major share of
revenue from televised meets to
track clubs around the country to'
help finance club programs.
-Unite the men's and women's
track and field program to streng-
then both for the 1972 Olympics.
The teams now train and compete
separately..
-Ask meet directors for a nomi-
nal contribution to help finance
trips for athletes representives toj
AAU and international meetings.
-And open quicker lines of
communications between the AAU
and the athletes.
"Athletes on the AAU board is a
great step," Connolly said. "B u t
our objective is to get more. We
need a larger voice so we can
broaden our participation in de-
cision making. We're not looking
toward professionalism. We just
want a modernization of t h e
arachaic amateur rules."

Against
The Wall
Defense Depart ment'
rips of f mountain
By JONATHAN MILLER
TOPEKA, KANSAS has become something of a joke; it is a
town which has only one claim to fame, and that is being
the Burbank of the Midwest. But Topeka is an interesting place,
after all they did have Brown vs. School Board, but that was in
1954. Since then, Topeka has turned into a model of idyllic su-
burban life, and when I was last there someone told me (with
a face beaming pride), that Topeka was the hundreth biggest
urban conglomeration in the country.
Topeka has it's share of problems, but it's biggest one is
the lack of a mountain. People all over Topeka will tell you
how sadly they miss a mountain. The whole state is aware of
Topeka's lack of a mountain, but then Topeka is, believe it or
not, the State Capital.
Topeka's problem of not possessing a mountain began about
five years ago when the Department of Defense came along and
took it away. There were of course protests, petitions and let-
ters from the Jaycees to the Governor (a nice guy the gover-
nor, but I'll come to him later), but there wasn't you might say
a 'real' protest. The Nation's Capital did not have delegations
from Topeka beseiging it, and there were no sit-ins on the min-
uscule campus of Washburn University.
SOME OF YOU may be wondering why Topeka is so upset
about their non-mountain. It is like this you see. Topeka lies
in Shawnee County. Shawnee County is named Shawnee coun-
ty because the Shawnee Indians were always the people who
lived there until they were put in reservations tb amuse the few
tourists that found Kansas at all.
Well the Indians are happy, this story is not about the In-
dians at all, but they are happy, you ask the Governor if the
Indians are happy or not, and ten to one he will admit to you
that the Indians are happy. The point is, that the Indians had
a legend. The legend was that if Burnets Mound (it never really
was a mountain, just a mound), was ever lifted up to the happy
hunting grounds, a great evil would befall Topeka. Now nobody
ever really believed this, including the Defense Department who
discovered that their B-52's couldn't take off. from the runway
at their nearby base if the mound was in the way. They forgot
about the mound when they built the runway you see.
It so happens that Topeka has always been rather prone to
tornadoes, but they never really mattered because they always
seemed to swerve from theirpath at the last -minute and go
through the Negro section of town, and because the Negros
never really owned very nice houses it was cheap to replace
them when they were destroyed. The Negro LIKES tornadoes,
you ask any Negro, so it made sense for 'the tornadoes to co-
operate by going through the Negro section of town.
NOW JUST AFTER the Defense vandal removed the moun-
tain there was a tornado. But this tornado was different be-
cause it went straight through the very best middle class neigh-
borhoods, ruined the best middle class schools, and destroyed
the acres of crab grass that went with it.
It was very strange that the tornado had done this terrible
thing, it had never done it before. Then someone remembered
the mound, mountain or whatever, and someone found that the
lack of same had FAILED TO DIVERT THE TORNADO.
But never mind, the Negros are happy because the nice
white area got demolished, and their shacks were not, and the
Indian is happy because he was right all along.
The military-industrial complex has been accused of some
pretty henious crimes recently, but to the (white) people of
Topeka-Kansas this is the biggest, foulest, most underhanded
thing they have ever done. That is why there was a moratorium
in Topeka, Kansas, and there will be more until Nixon realizes
that the silent majority want their mountain back. Nixon, you
better build them the newest, biggest, shiniest mountain in all
history if you want to carry Kansas in '72.
transcendental ,
meditation
os taught by b <
Maharishir' " .
Moheshx^ s
Yogi
Wednesday,.Jan. 14
AU. C-AHie
8:00 P.M.

1~
*

4r

-SKI MOVIE-

i

ALSO

Sign up for Sugor Loaf Trip
Jan. 16, 17, 18

._.. ___....

$10 DEPOSIT

L

I

Engineers & Scientists
iS COMIUNG
MONDAY, JANUARY 26
See your Placement Director today to ar-
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During the question and answer ses-
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Ask him, too, about the Xerox philoso-
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This investment of your time could be _
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fundamental and applied research, devel-
opmental andmanufacturing engineering,
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0-

p

I

I

i

- ~-I = :1

-U

i

" . ..1

""""

/

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JANUARY 19
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