100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 13, 1970 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


I"

Friday, March 13, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Pace Nine

PITCHING POSES PROBLEM

++yr.. ..

l:

Bengals attempt to roar without McLain

By The Associated Press
LAKELAND, Fla.-Mayo Smith
must know he faces a near-im-
possible task of trying to win a
pennant at .Detroit without Denny
McLain but he refused to admit it.
"With or without McLain," said
Smith, "we've got to goabout the
job of trying to win this thing.
It's a closed issue as far as my
ball players are concerned. From
here on in, it's up to Bowie Kuhn."
McLain, of course, is sweating
out an indefinite suspension for
what commissioner Kuhn called,
"involvement in 1967 bookmaking
activities and his associations at
the time."
The 31-game winning sensation
of the 1968 pennant team and 24-
9 performer on last year's second-
place team Is waiting it out at his
Lakeland home.
McLain's troubles were com-
pounded yesterday when a $50,000
damage suit was filed against him
in Kalamazoo County court.
The suit, among other things,

accuses McLain of keeping "for his
separate use" some of the rev-
enues of the company and of not
coming up with $20,000 in capital,
which, the plaintiffs charge, he
had promised to do to finance the
plan.
Denny hopes for a short sus-
pension but must realize that it
may last all year or maybe for-
ever.
Commenting on McLain's sus-
pension, manager Smith com-
mented, "Naturally, this makes our
job that much tougher.
"I told the' players and I will
tell you that we still have the
personnel to win."
HOWEVER, the personnel of
the Tigers, including McLain and
his 24 victories was only good
enough to finish second in the
American League East last season,
19 lengths behind the pennant-
winning Baltimore Orioles.
Smith's main concern is to try
to piece together a pitching staff

that can recover some, if not all,
of the 24 games lost by McLain's
suspension.
Mickey Lolich, the pitching star
of the 1968 World Series triumph,
moves front and center as the big
man of, the staff.
Mike Kilkenny, a surprising late
season bloomer who spent the first
four onths in the bullpen, moves
into the reguar rotation with Earl
Wilson, Joe Niekro and possibly
Jerry Robertson.
The need for starters may leave
the bullpen to Tom Timmerman,
side-arming Fred Lasher and Bob
Reed.-
If the pitching does shape up-
and that appears to be a tall or-
der-the Tigers do have the po-
tential to cause trouble.
DICK'McAULIFFE missed half
the 1969 season due to surgery on
his right knee but manager Smith
expects him" to be back at 100 per
cent of his old self and ready to
handle second base again.
Norm Cash, 35, will get some
relief at first from Al Kaline, also
35, who will shuttle between the
outfield and the infield.
Shortstop position will be held
down by either Cesar Gutierrez or
Tom Tresh while Don Wert and
Dalton Jones are fighting it out
for the third base spot.
Four men will devide the out-

field work. Horton will be in left
and Kaline in right. Mickey Stan-
ley, a shortstop last spring, is back
in center. Northrup, recovered
from knee surgery, will play
either center or right.
CATCHER Bill Freehan's home
run and RBI production fell off
last year and he must come back
strong if the Tigers are to be at
threat. Jim Price will catch when
Freehan rests, which is seldom.
In the National League, there
was some good news and some bad
news for St. Louis Cardinal fans.
Richie Allen, baseball's bad boy,
finaly signed his 1970 contract for
an estimated $85,000.
"I'm no angel," Allen com-
mented.
But he added, "I don't think
I'm as bad as I'm made out to
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Yesterday's Results
St. Louis 5, Detroit 0
Cleveland 4, Chicago (NL) 3
Atlanta vs. Montreal at West Palm
Beach, rain
Cincinnati 3, Kansas City 0
Los Angeles 10, Houston 6
Boston 2, New York (NL) 0
Oakland 12, San Francisco I
Baltimore vs. Washington at Pom-
pano Beach, rain
California 7, Seattle 6
Chicago (AL) vs. New York (NL) at
Miami, rain
Pittsburgh vs. Mexico City at Mexico
City, inc.

be." Then, he said, "I got no in-
tention doing those things in St.
Louis that I did in Philadelphia."
Meanwhile, St. Louis president
Gussie Busch blasted pitcher Steve
Carlton who is holding out for
more money.
"I don't care if he ever pitches
another ball for us again," the
angry Busch told a news confer-
ence after he and General Man-
ager Bing Devine met with Carl-
ton.

4Mike Maioy signs

PITTSBURGH (/P) - The ABA,
continuing their fight for recogni-
tion by the NBA grabbed another
top pro prospect from the college
ranks yesterday. Mike. Maloy of
"Davidson formally signed a three-
year contract worth about $150,000
with the Pittsburgh Pipers of the
American Basketball Association.
The 6-f oot-7 second team All-
American signed with the Pipers
in the presence of ABA commis-
sioner Jack Dolph.
"I didn't have time to wait," the
20-year-old Maloy said. "T h e
merger talks were a big factor, but
so was the money. I'm satisfied."
Maloy, the second major college
.-star to sign with the ABA this
year, said he was never contact-
ed by a National Basketball As-
sociation team.
"I really didn't feel I was pres-
sured except that I didn't want
to lose money."
"This can't do anything but help'
a merger," said Dolph. "There
will be more signings - probably
next week."
"We're paying boys more now
than they're going to get later,"
Dolph added. But he wouldn't
comment on reports that merger
agreement between the two rival
leagues could be consummated
next week.
"The sincerity of both parties to
merger fs now' a fact," Dolph said.
Maloy was the Pipers' f i r s t
choice in a secret draft last year.
Last week Rick Mount of Purdue
argued to a multi-year contract
with the" Indiana Pacers for an
estimated $500,000 to $750,000. It
was learned that both Mount and
Maloy's pacts include large life in-
surance policies.
The Davidson star, a political
science major, scored 1,484 points
in four years. He's from N e w
York.
The 6-foot-7 center had been a
standout throughout his college
career. As a freshman, when the
Wildcats had the only unbeaten
team in their history, he had a
21.9 scoring average. As a sopho-
more, when Davidson was ranked
eighth in the nation by T h e

's

Pipers

'

Associated Press, Maloy had a
15.6 average. As a junior he jump-
ed to a 24.6 average, and this sea-
son when Davidson was ranked
10th, he had a 17.4 average.
"I didn't come up here to tear
this league up in the scoring de-
partment," Maloy said. "But once
in a while I might," he smiled.
Maloy was named to the All-
Southern Conference team the last
three years, was the Charlotte In-
vitational Tournament Most Val-
uable Player for the last three
years and was chosen for the 1968
Olympic trials, but did not com-
pete.
The Piper's second draft choice
is Calvin Murphy of Niagara and
it is believed he may soon sign,
it was learned.
Pittsbulrgh, lodged in fifth place
in the East division of the ABA,
are 81/2 games behind the New
York Nats for the I a s t playoff
spot.

Al Kaline

JOIN THE SPORT OF THE SPACE AGE
PARACHUTING SERVICE
TECUMSEH, MICHIGAN
Michigan's Most Active
Sport Parachuting Center
Saturday, Sunday, Holidays
-For Information Call-
MON.-FRI.-291-3634
WEEKENDS-423-7720
ENJOY SKYDIVING AT ITS BEST
Classes Start 11:;00 Sat. & Sun.

now

seyour Sony.
from the Quarry

A

FRIDAY, 4 P.M. Mark's Coffee House
Cao Ngoc Phtioig,
Professor of Biology at Saigon and Hue Universities.
Before her departure in 1969, chief organizer of the
Buddhist student underground in Vietnam.
Vice-President of the National Committee for the Re-
lief of War Victims, United Buddhist Church.
Spokesman, Buddhist School of Youth for Social
Service, Saigon.
"Miss Phuong . . . is regarded as a heroine by peace-oriented intellec-
tuals in South Vietnam.
"'If the war continues, we will lose not only thousands of lives but all
the cultural and human values of our beloved country,' she said with a look
of agony.
"Miss Phuong's political views are well known to the government. The
Chief of Police (Saigon) has apparently put considerable effort into harass-
ing her.
"When she arrived at the Hue airport, she was arrested and held for
three days. Although not formally charged, she was told that she had been
picked up for carrying a pro-peace book 'Vietnam: Lotus in a Sea of Fire' by
Thich Nhat Hanh (Fellowship of Reconciliation). After three days she was
brought to Saigon and put in jail there:"-New York Times
4:00 MARK'S COFFEE HOUSE-E. William St.
7:00 FRIENDS MEETING HOUSE-Hill St.
OFFICE OF RELIGIOUS AFFAIRS, 2282 SAB

sONXye

0

C
l
f
t
t
{

i

1
Now The Quarry has all the brand new 1970 model Sony Cassette tape recorders
All Models Feature
" Ease and convenience of drop-in cassettes.
" Convenience and portability of AC or battery operation.
" Automatic recording level control . . simplifies perfect recoramlg
" Remote Start/Stop control
" Up to 2 hours recording time per cassette
" Microphone, personal earphone, and carrying case.
And check these brand new models ...
Model 70. Never before a Sony Cassette recorder at such a low price ... y$
only $69,50
Model 80: Push button operation and built-in electret condenser microphone . .
$99.50
Model 110: The 1970 version of the fabulous 100 model. The 110 boasts push button
operation, built-in electret condenser microphone plus extended range remote start/
stop microphone, cassette ejector, and tone control .

'V '.". ... . .'....-.-.'..v ............... . . S . f}......-..... . . . ..v'i .....: .v....n l"
A CHANGE IN ANN ARBOR
IT BEGINS TODAY-MONDAY, THE FIFTEENTH
STUD ENTS
INTERNATIONAL
will open it's Ann Arbor
COiMUNIhTY STORE
with specials through Tuesday, /March 16
RECORD-S $.9

and still only, $99.50

Model 120: (as illustrated)

All new and includes a digital counter, built-in electret condenser microphone, PLUS a
fine quality extended range remote start/stop cardiod microphone and push-button
operation .
$119.50
Or choose these ever-popular models...
Portable Model 50: Super compact palm sized unit. A miracle of modern electronics...
$119.50

Full Stereo
capability .

Models 124 and 124CS: That's right .,. portable stereo record and playback
.. $149.50 and $179.50 respectively.

Or the AC models to enhance the home.,..

Model 125:
component
Model 130:
consolette.

Full Stereo record and playback 'deck. Brings cassette. capability to any
hi-fi system ...
This model may replace the phonograph. Complete record and playback
Complete with two full range speakers...

I HAVE A PLACE
FOR YOU TO LIVE!

FOR NOW, THE
THE FALL .

SUMMER OR
WON'T YOU

{
:;
r

(Retail Price $4.98)
The S. 'wiI'serve the community.
\A/ ewnnt uni tn et what ou1ni i ncLd - mi czir ic n henin-

$169.50
Why not sound us out for your Sony ... Today?
That's the Quarry ... Hub of the good vibrations

COME IN?

t t; i::y:}
' <::} :

l:'

._>

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan