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March 13, 1970 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-13

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, March 13, 1970

PlgeEigh THEMICHGAN AIL

* juniorYear
in New York
The undergraduate colleges offer students
frorn all parts of the country an opportunity
t broadn their educational exerience
u'iior Year n New 'York+
w "New York Urjyersity is an inftegral part of
the exciting'rfetropolitan community of
New Yok-Cit heb es
artistic, nd finrd tai~al center of the ration:
The city's extraordinary resources greatly
enrich both the'academic(program and the
epriernce of living at New York University
- / tonopolitan studnt body in
the W
This program is open to students'
recommended by the -dearpslof the colleges
to hich they v return fcr their degrees.
Cournay.r b taken-in the
Scho of Commierce
School-ofEducation .
Wa ri tor} S are Col~gre of Arts
CInd'hce
New York University also sponsors:
Junior Year n France (Paris) '
Junior Ye ar in Spain (Madrid)
'AWrite for brochure to Director, Junior Year
in New York
NEW YORK UN IVERSiTY
New York, N.Y 10003

ECO-PROBLE MS:
ENAU'I
C C
Co~ntin ued from Page 1I
doing the task are certainly avail-
able, and all that is needed is a
sense of urgency to force us to
do it."
The next speaker, Henry Regeir,
Professor of Zoology at the Uni-
versity of Toronto, stated an en-
tirely conflicting viewpoint. He
maintained t h a t, ecologically,
speaking, "we are losing the war
against eventual catastrophe, al-
though up to now we have won:
many battles."
Unlike Hatcher, he said that
Lake Erie has died, that it has
undergone an irreversible trans-
formation caused, like all deaths,
by an accumulation of stresses'
over an extended period of time,
beginning in the nineteenth cen-
tury.
"The Economics and Politics of
Pollution Control" was the subject

conducts

wor

of .a panel-workshop attended by
over 170 people last night. A panel
of five spoke on varied aspects of
- the issue, after which there were
audience questions and then smal-
ler workshop sessions.
Jim Fay, Grad, spoke first on
the history of legislative efforts to
control pollution. "The economic
commitment to natural resources
has decreased," he said, citing
figures which showed that $19
million less was put into natural
resources in 1969 than in 1967.
Natural resources Prof. Gunter
Schramm questioned the priority
of pollution control over other
areas, such as education and wel-
fare. He said the term "pollution"
must be redefined to mean "the
discernable damages and disad-
vantages" caused by wastes.
"Given the factor of high cost,"
he said, the use of economic re-

Officials ask public
anti-pollution support

HContinued from Page 1
He 'described seeking the nests
of dozens of comorants and Cal-
ifornia pelicans with cracked egg-
shells and dead embryos caused
by DDT in the environment. Al-
bert noted that a billion pounds of
the pesticide are still in the at-
mosphere.
"This spaceship earth is all we
have," he concluded, "'We have

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to love it and respect it or we're
stuck."
Earlier, Ralph MacMullan, di-
rector of the state ndtural resourc-
es department, claimed that thef
next decade will be crucial in de-
ciding whether mankind can be
saved from destruction.
Over-population, pollution, re-
source depletion and nuclear war
were listed by MacMullan as the
four leading threats to man. Mac-
Mullan put himself on record fav-
oring legalized abortion and a
stabilized, non-growth economy to
help the situation.
"Growth, of all kinds, is a kind
of sacred cow in our society," he
commented. "Our whole economic
system is now based on growth,
growth, fueled basically by popu-
lation increase which provides
new customers adn new markets."
The teach-in continues today
with a noon Diag rally featuring
Sen. Philip Hart and ecologist
Hugh Iltis. Local bands will pro-
vide entertainrhent,
folk legacy
rec. artist

sources for control of wastes which
may not cause damage is ques-
tionable.
Then economics Prof. Daniel
Fusfeld spoke of the "human
wastes" of society. As society con-
siders some products economical
unworthwhile, he said, so it con-
siders some products economically
worthwhile, and isolates these
people in such concentrated areas
as ghettos. And the solution to the
problem of the ghetto, Fusfeld
said, was analogous to the solu-
tion to tlhe problem of physical
waste: social structures must be
changed.
The series of speeches sponsored
last night by the departments of
botany and zoology on the topic,
'Ecological Balance and the Qual-
ity of Life" painted anything but
a "pretty picture," in the words
of onelecturer.
The panel featured Prof. La-
mont Cole, on ecologist from Cor-
nell University, who spoke about
the problems posed by a techno-
logical society. He was followed
by five professors from the de-
partments of botany and zoology.
"The basic problem," he said,
"one we share with the Russians
has been called the chamber of
commerce syndrome. This means
urging growth as desirable .or its
own sake."
"Man is making a shambles of
earth," he said, predicting the{
world will be uninhabitable in 30
years-unless the present alloca-
tions to improve the environment
are drastically increased.
The ecologist mourned. "The
present high standard of living is
for this generation only-due to
past decisions based on short-
term economic gain."
A psychiatrist calling for "a
period of deliberate concern in-
stead of being neglect" headed a
program of speeches and discus-
sion about "The Urban Condition"
last night.
' x
Speaking to a crowd of about
200 in the Michigan Union, Leon-
ard Duhl, a psychoanalyst who has
worked for the Peace Corps, Rob-
ert Kennedy campaigns and the
Department of Housing and Ur-
ban Development, expressed strong
pessimism about America changing
its priorities and working on
urban problems.
"I've worked with just about
every federal agency dealing with
these problems during the golden
years," he said. "and I come away
very pessimistic because we didn't
develop any of the mechanisms to
accomplish what we wanted to
do."

ishops
have no leadership on any level
that can put these problems to-
gether."
In addition to attacking the ex-
perts. Duhl charged the American
people with a perhaps irreversable
complacency on the issue. "We
have so much inertia to go against;
it's so hard to change people; it's
just so easy to do things the old
way," he said.
But Bertram Gross. a professor
of political science involved in the
Center of Urban Studies at Wayne
State University, said he believed
it possible that the minds of the
country were changing.
"All the alienation and con-
fusion, the new fascism and recent
Hitlerism are results of a great
and unbelievably rapid social rev-
olution," he said.
Although admitting the current
revolution was much more rapid
and confusing than the changes
accompanying the industrial rev-
olution, he expressed hope that
the country was heading toward a
post-industrialism in which a new
American consciousness might
make change more accessible than
it is today.
Hays lifts,
(Continued from Page 1i}
Siano said he was writing a state-
ment which will be offered as
testimony at the CSJ hearing.
"I did not see Bob Parsons strike
Prof. Young, and I was, on the
scene at the time of the incident,"
Siano said.
The protesters yesterday march-
ed to the LSA Bldg. following a
noon rally on the Diag. They pro-
ceeded to the second floor lobby
where they were met by Hays.
After the dean agreed to discuss
the Parsons case with them, most
of the protesters seated them-
selves in the crowded lobby, al-
though a large number of them
were forced to remain in the stair-
ways leading out of the room.
After learning that Parsons'
suspension had been lifted, the
protesters'began a spirited discus-
sion with Hays and several faculty
nembers on job recruitment on
campus, the University's judicial
system, and student participation
in rule and decision-making.
At one point, Hays denied a
demand by a large number of the
protesters that he sign a statement
promising to refrain from sum-
marily suspending a student in'
the future.
Hays later said that he con-
sidered summary suspension the
proper course of action in certain
situations. He added, however,
that these situations should be
clearly defined under the college's
rules of conduct.

Parsons suspension

Teaching fellows meetu
with Smith on union

By TAMMY JACOBS
Members of a teaching fellows'
group currently trying to organize
met yesterday with Allan Smith.
vice president for academic af-
fairs, for an informal discussion of
their status as a bargaining unit.
Smith indicated that there
were still many questions as to
whether the teaching fellows con-
stitute a proper unit of employes.
"While teaching fellow, as a
title, is certainly an identifiable
group," he said. However, "t h e
functions performed by teaching
fellows are not identical."
He cited differences 'between
teaching fellows and research as-
sistants, and also, differences be-
tween teaching fellows who have
to teach as part of their degree
requirements and therefore get in-
come tax exemptions and those
who don't.
"Assuming that there is going
to be a bargaining unit," Smith
said, the University would prefer
to djal with teaching fellows "as a
totality."
He also said . the University-
would abide by tle Hutchison Act,
in recognizing the teaching fel-
lows.

'We're certainly sensitive to the
due process issue now," he said.
"The code of rules for LSA and
the rest of the University should
m a k e s u r e that precautions
(against violations of due process)
exist."
Several students critici7ed the'
current rule-making structure at
the University, contending that
rules which govern students should
be made aind approved by students
or their representatives.
However, Hays maintained that
rules should be made jointly iby
students and faculty.
"Students and faculty will never
be able to solve areas of conflict;
until they mutually lay down some
basic ground rules," he said, "We
must have a community effort."
When the discussioir turned to
the issue of on-campus job re-
cruiting, Hays said that it was his
Chester
n t
Eric Chester, Grad, was con-
victed late Wednesday night in
Ann Arbor Distr~ict Court of creat-
ing a contention in the LSA Bldg.
sit-in last fall.
The 6-man jury deliberated for
almost 12, hours before handing
down its decision.
Chester, who served as his own
lawyer, will be sentenced April
17. He said he will appeal the ver-
dict. k

personal opinion that recruiting
should not be sponsored by the
University.
Participating in the discussion
were several faculty members:
Prof. Louis Orlin, of the near east-
ern language and literature de-
partment, Prof. Theodore Buttrey,
chairman of the classical studies
department, and Prof. Gerhard
Weinberg, of the history depart-
ment.
The discussion broke up after
about 45 minutes, with the ,pro-
testers expressing mixed reactions
about the success of their action.
Some were satisfied because the
suspension had been lifted.Others,
however, expressed disappointment
that they were unable to secure
further concessions from Hays.
Referring to the suspension and
yesterday's protest, Parsons said,
"This type of conflict will con-
inue as long as the University
serves the military and the cor-
porations which supply it, because
we will continue acting against '
those institutions of death, includ,
ing the University."
recnInruiting
(Continued from Page 1)

The Hutchison Act is the state
labor rights law, which forbid pub-
lib employes from striking, b u t
gives them the right to organ-
ize collectively.
When the teaching fellows
pressed Smith , to give them the
University's definition of what
does constitute a proper bargain-
ing unit, he told them "we'll do
that at the hearing."
The teaching fellows will face
a formal hearin with the State
Employment Relations Commis-
sion April 22-24. They had recent-
ly received a setback when they
fell slort of the required number
of signs tues on a petition to the 3p
commission.
However. Steering Committee
Chairman Alison Hayford. a geo-
graphy teaching fellow, says the
group now has the required signa-
.tures and is in the process of get-
ting more to use as a margin. The
group will then refile the petition,
which they had been forced to
withdraw.
Later last night, the steering
committee of the teaching fel-
lows' grou met to discuss reac-
tions to the meeting with Smith,
and further strategy.

i '

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mittee members were approved,
and had set up their formal rules
of procedure, it would already be
mid-April, "when students are
more concerned with passing their
courses than discussing the re-
cruiter issue."
Those who oppose on-campus
job recruiting maintain that it is
one of the ties between the Uni-
versity and corporations which,
they charge, are imperialistic, rac-
ist and are making a profit out
of U.S. military activities abroad,
particularly in Vietnam.
In defending on campus j o b
recruiting, President Fleming has
said the number of protesters is
small compared with the number
who "are now saying that they
have a free right to an interview."
Fleming adds that placing recruit-
ing off-campus might result in a
disruption of the interview site,
which would "put the pioblem
back on the lap of the University."
Discussing the recruiter issue
yesterday, Dean Hays said, "Peo-
ple should have an opportunity to
have job interviews, but I don't
think the University should make
a special provision for it.",
If recruiting were placed o f f -
campus, he added, "it should not
be interfered with (by protest-
ers)

#4

~T4
a

4

TODAY
3:30 p.m. in HILL AUDITORIUM
Panel on

I

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I

THEWAR AND TI
EN VIRONMEN T
KENNETH BOULDING, Economist, Univ. of Colorado
ANATOL RAPOPORT, Mathematic Biologist, U of M

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MARCH 13
1 :00 P.M.
3513 E. E.
2:00 P.M.
Union
Assembly Hall

"ROLE OF NUCLEAR POWER PRODUCTION"
Department of Nuclear Engineering
Representatives from Detroit Edison and Consumer Power
WorkshopI
"AIR POLLUTION"
Dr. Harold Magnuson, Associate Dean, School of Public Health
William Mirsky, Professor of Mechanical Engintering
Dr. Bloomfield, Michigan Department of Public Health

in being absolutely
sure of no feminine
offense with
MAY

I

i

Cnrlinr r

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