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March 12, 1970 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-12

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A

Thursday, March 12, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pace Seven

Thursday, March 12, 1970 THE MICHIGAN DAiLY

.P-:I- Seve-n

,4,

PROTEST PLANNED:
LSA discipline maintained

13,000 attend ENACT rally

(Continued from Page 1)
At the discussion between the
executive committee and the ad
hoc delegation of students, Steve
Nissen, '70, said several people in-
volved in the GE recruiter incident
had told him that Parsons was
not the demonstrator who struck
Young.
Young and two engineering stu-
dents have filed sworn affidav-
its charging that Parsons struck
the professor.
In maintaining the suspension,
the executive committee ignored
an order issued yesterday by the
Central Student Judiciary that the
action be revoked. The University
administration has never recogniz-
ed the right of CSJ to issue such
an order.
The organizers o ftoday's rally
will urge the group to emphasize
demands that the suspension be
rescinded.
Speakers at the noon rally will
include Parsons, Bruce Levine of
the International Socialists andj
psychology Prof. Richard Mann,
a member of the Radical College.
A spokesman for the organizers'
of. the rally said yesterday that
all plans 'involve peaceful actions
and that any decisions on remain-
ing in Hays' office will be made'
democratically by those present.
In a related aitcon
In a related action yesterday,j
representatives of 12 of the 19
member houses of, Panhellenic
Association signed a statement as-j
serting the belief that Parsons su-
spension "is a violation of the
due process of the law guaranteed
by the SO Bill of Rights and
the Regents bylaws."
The Panhel statement was sign-
ed by representatives of the fol-'
lowing sororities: Alpha D e 1 t a

Pi, Alpha Epsilon Phi, Alpha
Gamma Delta, Alpha Omicron Pi,
Alpha Phi, Pi Omega, D e l t a
Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Gam-
ma Phi Beta, Kappa Alpha Theta,
Kappa Kappa Gamma, and Sigma
Delta Tau.
Under the SGC Bill of Rights,
which is also not recognized by
the administration, students are
guaranteed "the right to an in-
dependent, fair, and impartial ju-
diciary in all cases" and "the
right to judicial due process, in-
cluding a speedy trial, confronta-
tion of plaintiff and his witnesses,
counsel, presumption of inno-

cence, protection against cruel
and unusual punishment, and ap-
peal."
Parsons was not informed of the
action being taken against him
until he received notification of
his suspension last Saturday. He
was not given an opportunity to
present his owri case to the execu,
tive committee or to Hays.
Meanwhile yesterday, the Uni-j
versity administration circulated a
"Report to the University Com-
munity" which restated arguments
that the action was an appropri-
ated response to the alleged as-
sault.

SDS plans protest of
Atlantic Richfield Co.

(Continued from.Page 1)
ment, followed Milliken with a de-
mand that more blacks be admit-
ted to the University and a plea
that people should consider the
entire environment.
"To many Americans, pollution
is the bigotry, racism and poverty
in this country," he said. "The
filth is not in our air but in our
universities and legislatures.
Godfrey, the next speaker, said
that even the most advanced tech-
nology would not help the en-
vironment if population rate is not
reduced.
"Genesis said 'be fruitful and
multiply' but this is getting ridi-
culous," he added.
"Life as we know it may not see
the advent of the 21st century,"
Godfrey said. "But that's no rea-
son for breaking out grass, booze
and acid. What we need to do is
get together and get moving."
Shapiro, who quit Harvard last
month to devote himself to polit-
ical activism, also called for ac-
tion. Shapiro's main target, how-
ever, was business corporations
that pollute for profit.
"We have to insist that the peo-
ple who made profits out of pol-
lution pay to clean it up," he said.
Shapiro gave part of his time to
Robert Parsons who accused the
University of "being a servant of
the corporations and military in
this country. Parsons asked an
end to University involvement
with ROTC, defense department
research and recruiters of com-
panies that supply war material.
"Our goals must be an environ-
ment without discrimination, ghet-
toes, poverty and war," Nelson
said in his keynote speech. "Our
goal must be a decent environ-
ment in the widest sense of the
word."
Nelson said the struggle could
not be won without long-term I

ethical, moral and financial com-
mitments. He urged immediately
allocating $25 billion a year to
fight environmental decay with
eventual expenditures of as much
as $40 billion a year.
"It sounds like a lot, and it is,
but it's not more than we've wast-
ed on Vietnam or will eventually
waste on an ABM system," Nelson
explained. "Our object ought to be
to make both the Red Army and
the Pentagon as obsolete as soon
as possible."
He called for new national poli-
cies on land use, pesticides and
herbicides, the ocean, resources
management, air and water qual-
ity and population control,
"It's time that we put gross na-
tional quality above gross na-,
tional product," he concluded.
Commoner, the final speaker of
the evening, emphasized the role
technology has played in produ-
cing pollution as well as the war
issue.

"There are strong links between
the environmental crisis and the
evils of war in general, and the
Vietnam war in particular," he
said. "Our industrial system is
heavily sustained by the military
diversion of human and natural
resources."
Commoner added that blacks
are the special victims of pollu-
tion, unable to escape city dirt and
smog for the suburbs.
"We have to learn from each
other," Commoner said, and that
was what the whole evening was
about.
The Continuing Education Serv-
ices of nursing school is present-
ing a workshop entitled "New
Perspectives for Nurse Coordina-
tors of Continuing Education in
Community Hospitals" through
March 13 in the Towsley Center
.or Continuing Medical Education.
A repeat workshop will be held
April 6 through 17.

7 days and nights on
the beach at the Hotel
Acapulco.
A welcome in cocktail
party.
Moonlight cruise includ-
ing free parties, floor
shows, sailing, swim-
ming, riding, fishing.

1

days-and nights at the

Freeport Inn

Free h a p py hours with
rock bands every night.
Free services to beach-
es and casinos.
Scuba diving, snorkling,
fishing

RUN FOR THE SUN
FROM APRIL 29 TO MAY 6
and stay in
ACAPULCO or the BAHAMAS
either one is ONLY $189
and includes

(Continued from Page 1)
The existence of the tundra of
wildlife, their feeding and migra-
tion patterns, will be endangered..
The string of roads, railways,
pumping stations and settlements
planned by the pipeliners will
further disturb the arctic eco-
system."-
Miller also alleges that a break
in the pipeline Could "spill 500,000
gallons of oil for each mile of line
onto the Alaskan tundra, smoth-
ering the sparse vegetation in a
sea of oil."-
The arguments dealing with eco-
logical damage arising from the
pipeline were disputed by John
Nation, the manager of public re-
lations for the Trans-Alaska Pipe
Line System, the company con-
structing the pipeline.
"We are going to build this pipe-

line with minimum disturbance to
the environment and that which
we have to disturb we will have to
restore to the very best of our
abilities," Nation said in a tele-
phone interview yesterday from
Anchorage.
He added that the company has
undertaken a number of surveys
to assess where potential ecological
dangers would take place and how
best to avoid them.
He contended that much of the
permafrost is solid rock and con-
sequently too thick and dry to be
melted by the heated oil. The
pipeline, is said, would only fall
if the permafrost was icy, but
"where there is high ice content
we can either go around it or
we'll go above it. If it is icy per-
mafrost, we will not bury the pipe-
lines."

Dispute on discipline looms

(Continued from Page 1)
proposed bylaws which would
clarify the student role in Univer-
sity decision and rule-making.
Part of their assignment was to
draft bylaws defining the judicial
structure at the Universty.
By fall, 1968, the ad hoc com-
mttee had reached agreement on
the general nature of the new
judicial structure, which in non-,
academic cases, would center
around Central Student Judiciary.
CSJ would be similar to JJC. ex-
cept that its decisions would be
final subject only to reversal by
the president of the University.
In the fall, SGC voted to amend
the Council Plan to define a ju-
dicial structure at the Universityj

which paralleled the bylaw drafts
-and CSJ was created.
Meanwhile, in summer, 1968,
President Robben Fleming asked
the faculty in each of the schools
and colleges to adopt regulations
governing student conduct and
mechanisms for their enforce-
ment, which would remain in ef-
fect until the Regents adopted the
bylaws then being drafted.
In the literary college, a facul-
ty code was established, and the
administrative board was granted
jurisdiction in all cases involving'
violation of the code. The dean,
however, was given the power to
make summary judgments in ex-
treme circumstances.

or, just get away from it all.
(either place has miles of beach)
Along with your jet airfare and baggage handling,
you get the vacation of a lifetime.

. '

for information BARRY BOYER, 761-6359
STUDENT TOURS - 886-0822
Reservations

' '!

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j ., ... .. ,........, ww.vvv.

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