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March 10, 1970 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-10

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, March 10, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, March 10, 1970

cinema:

By NEAL GABLER
Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. is
dead. The FBI closely watched
his activities, tapped his phone,
spread scurrilous rumors; but
they didn't save his life. Joseph
Yablonski is dead too. Despite
the repeated pleas of his sup-
porters following an attempt on
his life, the government did
nothing. Now they are investi-
gating the union election-now,
when it is too late. Fred Hamp-
ton is dead. The police only
wanted to search his apartment.
They didn't have any tear gas,
so they used bullets.
All three cases are shocking,
but none is totally surprising. In
some nook or cranny of our
bureaucracy, someone c o u l d
have anticipated, perhaps even
prevented, what happened, and.
in at least one case there are
those who believe the death
directive came from the govern-
ment itself. Once the crimes are
-committed all we can do is give
an anguished cry for justice.
Instead of justice, Ray sits in
his cell concealing God knows
what. Tony Boyle conducts his
own investigation and the Chi-
cago police go their merry blood-
stained way. All the while the
system beams, "Justice has been
done."
Of course, for many of us this
is not justice but pacification.
A culprit has been apprehended,
trouble has been avoided, the
American Way is preserved, and
the blacks and the miners won't
epen remember the mess a year
from now. It would be quite
wrong, however, to view the de-
fenders of this system as devil's

cinematic chronicle of justice'

DIAL 662-6264

LAST 2
DAYS
SHOWS AT:
1:15-3:45-6:20 and 9:00 P.M.

henchmen. It is probable that
John Mitchell really and truly
believes he is acting justly, only
his conception of the word dif-
fers vastly from ours.
The question of "What is Jus-
tice?" has plagued man since
the time of Socrates, and it is
this question that Z, now play-
ing at the Campus Theater, tries
to resolve. The film tells the
story of the assassination on
May 22, 1963, of Gregorios Lam-
brakis, a Greek opposition leader
and of the subsequent investiga-
tion of his death. More than
this, it is the story of the pur-
suit of justice against over-
whelming odds and the fierce
battle for Truth.
There are two contesting for-
ces; two conceptions of justice
striving for primacy. On one
side are the colonels and their
satraps, operating on the prin-
ciple of raison d'etat-our ac-
tions-are their own justification.
They are guided by expediency.
not maliciousness. After all, if
Papadopoulus IS the State, how
can he wrong the State?
On the other side is the Op-
position. They realize that jus-
tice is meaningful only when it
has an existence separate from
the State. Unlike the informer
who says he opposes communism
because "in Russia everything
belongs to the State," they un-
derstand that in Greece, and in
America as well, the one most
important thing, Right, does be-
long to the State to be dispensed
at the whim of the politburo.
It is the inisfortune of gov-
ernment leaders everywhere that
s o m e m i n or functionaries

haven't yet been imbued with
the spirit of raison d'etat. The
investigator (Jean-Louis Trin-
tignant) of Lambrakis' "acci-
dent" merely does his duty with
probity and fairness, unaware
that he has been delegated the
task of covering the govern-
ment's tracks. But it is fairness
that is the enemy to the self-
styled duces. As one of them
says after new evidence has been
introduced, "There is j u s t
enough to cause trouble." When
trouble threatens, fairness isn't
fair and justice isn't just.
In the unraveling of the.
crime the very nature of film
as a series of still photographs
plays a prominent role. Director
Constantin Costa-Gavras uses
the montage of the assassina-
tion, with its objectivity, as a
kernel of truth in the sea of lies.
First we see it as it really hap-
pened; then, we see a colonel's
version; finally, we see it in slow
motion so that we can see un-
mistakably the crushing blow.
We are the only ones who know
what actually occurred, and it
makes us a party to the quest
for Truth.
There are other uses of film
as a continous string of images.
X-rays are the key in revealing
that a blow had been struck and
that death was no accident.
Photographs are also used to
finger the criminals. And, )sig-
nificantly, it is a photographer
ala Blow-Up who braves the
stormy waters of intrigue with
his Nikon. Witnesses can lie, but
Costa-Gavras never leaves his
audience in doubt-the photo
images tell all.
One of the fascinating things
about the film is its brilliant
blend of objectivity and passion.
Like Battle of Algiers and Easy
Rider it arouses intense emo-
tions. But unlike those films it
never allows its politics to de-
stroy its message. If you think

Battle of Algiers is a glorifica-
tion of violence, where were you
during the last five minutes
when the Algerians spontane-
ously demonstrate for freedom
years after the terrorism has
ceased? If Easy Rider is a lat-
ter-day Intolerance, why are
Billy and Wyatt s-o-o-o Amer-
can?
The problem with these ear-
lier films is that many of us
identify so strongly with the op-
pressed Algerians and the
slaughtered cyclists that we
naturally see them as Good
while their opponents are Evil,
even though this easy dichotomy
undermines these films' pre-
mise; politicization will do that
to you. Z carefully uses politici-
zation to its advantage. Most of
the audience will side with the
Opposition not because Yves
Montand is an "Olympic cham-
pion, a doctor, a university pro-
fessor and an honest politician."
That's all very nice, but few of
us identify with saints. Rather,
his group appeals to us because
they are Leftists struggling
agaist fascism. They wear their
politics like the cowboy of yore
wore white hats.
Although they wear peace

arm-bands, it would be an error,
I think, to regard Montand and
his crew as the heroes in this
piece. Doubtless they are good,
but they never quite rise to any-
thing more than a Steve Reeve's
heroism. Nor does the investi-
gator win our affection, even
if he wins our admiration; he is
an instrument of the law. The
real hero is the idea of freedom
that underlies the film, and it
is this concept, as played out in
the arena of human events, to
which I was attached.
Liberty as hero is given a foil
in repression. There are many
despicable miscreants afoot, and
even the assassins' names Yago
and Vago have an evil ring
thanks to Shakespeare. These
know-nothings seem to get an
unbridled delight in cudgeling
the innocents of the Left. But
they are unthinking pawns
manipulated by the higher-ups.
They arouse our ire only be-
cause, as victims and tools of
nationalism, they personify the
system we so hate.
Thus unencumbered by the
necessity to create a human hero
and villain, and relying on our
asociation of Left with Good,
the picture is able to zip along

at the dizzying pace of o rocket
sled. Make no mistake - Z is
a first-rate thriller guaranteed to
have you gnawing your knuckles.
And there is more involvement
than in Hitchcock. because more
is at stake than the vindication
of Gary Grant or Jimmy Stew-
art. Justice itself is threatened,
and the whole of government
leadership is the stalking mur-
derer.
As a political thriller Z is one
of the most unnerving, exhaust-
ing films I've ever seen. Much
of its power comes from its rele-
vance to our situation. Although
set in Greece, it has its silent
majority, its Nixon, its Agnew,
its Mitchell. It also has its hon-
est men who speak of State and
justice as distinct entities and
without whom total defeat would
be certain. As it is, the wrong-
doers are indicted. The Opposi-
tion screams,' "A real revolu-
tion! The Government will fall!"
Lambrakis' widow is less exul-
tant. She knows better.
On April 21, 1967, democracy
ended in Greece.

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3 NIGHTS

BON4NIE AND CLYDE
starring
WARREN BEATTY and FAYE DUNAWAY
directed by ARTHUR PENN (Alice's Restaurant)

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DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
TUESDAY, MARCH 10
Day Calen1dar
Center, for Continuing Education of
Women Seminar: "Working With the
Culturally Disadvantaged..In t 1h e
S~ihodls", 330 Thompson St., 9:30 a.m.
Nat. Resurces Let.:Dr. A. Larkin,
U of British Columbia, "The Science
CGouncil of: Canada. and It's Work on
Problems of Environmental Manage-
ment": Rackham Amph., 3:00 p.m.
Computer, Info. & Control Engin.
Seminar: John Hopcroft, Cornell U.,
"Mipimization of Arithmethic Opera-
tions": 1504 E. Engin., 4:00 p.m.
Dept. of Hist. of Art. Lect., Ellen
Johnson, Oberlin Coll., "Oldenberg's
Analogues, Metomorphoses and Sourc-
es". Aud. B. Rngell Hall, 4:00 p.m.
Computer -& Communic. Sci. Seminar:

Shen Lin, Bell Tel. Labs, Inc., N.J.,
"Heuristic Techniques for Solving Large
Combinatorial Problems on a Com-
puter", 4051 LSA, 4:00 p.m.
Dept. of Near Eastern Lang., & Lit.:
Zwerdling Lect. in Old Testament Stu-
dies: Robert Gordis, Temple U., "The
Nature of the Massoretic Texts in Light
of the Qumran Scrolls" 182 Physics-
Astronomy Bldg., 4:10 P.m.
Dept. of Ger. Lang. & Lit.: E g a n
Swartz, Wash U., St. Louis, "Hermann
Hesse, the American Youth Movement,
and the Problem of Literary Evaluation"
Assembly Hall of Rackham, 4:10 p.m.
Physics Seminar: Frank Henyey,
"Special Relativistic Theory of Gravita-
tion" P & A Colloq. Rn., 4:15 p.m.
Degree Recital: David Peterson, tuba,
School of Music Recital Hall, 8:00 p.m.
General Notices

What the World needs now:
A MUSICAL PEACE'
SPRING CONCERT by
University of Michigan Men's Glee Club
Friday, April 3,1970
8:30 P.M. - HILL AUDITORIUM
Ticket Sales at Hill Auditorium Box Office
Block Ticket Sales March 24-March 26
General Ticket Sales March 30-April 3
Ticket Prices: $3.00, $2.50, $2.00

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Aud. A, Angell Hall

7:00 &.30

75c

t

U. of M. Sheffield Program: Applica-
tions to participate is avail. in Rms.
4002 and 4017 Univ. Sch.; if you wish
to partic. Winter term '71, return
applcs. to above rms., before March
20.
(Continued on Page 7)

WOW!
A three-piece Treasure Chest
chicken dinner, plus french fries,
for only 79! Larger take-home
orders also. Try a box soon H
*M~iLNGPEEDY QERVICS
West of Arborland

MAIL ORDERS TO:

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University of Michigan Men's Glee Club
6048 Administration Building
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48104
Phone: 764-7265!

MARCH 12, 13, 14-Thursday, Friday, Saturday
Come early to get good seats for second show
There will be a lot of GOOD THEATRE
in town this week. A couple of familiar
and popular BROADWAY MUSICALS will be
available. But once again count on
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS to bring you
the unusual, distinctive and unique
opportunity. This week UNIVERSITY
PLAYERS offers a ONCE IN A LIFETIME
chance to see CALDERON'S famed
and seldom produced classic of the
great theatre of the SPANISH RENAISSANCE
LIFE IS A DREAM
This fascinating play is both comic and
profound. You will long remember its
brilliant language, handsome setting,
superb costumes and exciting music. See
L E IS A DREAM
at TRUEBLOOD THEATRE
on Wednesday through
Saturday, March 11-14. Tickets at
Frieze Building Box Office, Monday-Tuesday,
12:30-5:00 P.M., Wednesday-Saturday,
12:30-8:00 P.M. Phone 764-5387

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I, HAVE A PLACE
FOR YOU TO LIVE!
FOR NOW, THE SUMMER OR

EASTERNĀ° MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY with the support of the
MICHIGAN COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS, presents
THE ALVIN AILEY
AMERICAN DANCE THEATRE
Pease Auditorium - EMU, Ypsilanti, Michigan
TONIGHT and THURSDAY
General Adm ission-$2.00; Reserved-$3.00
Tickets available at EMU, McKenny Union; WSU Ticket Office;
J. L. Hudson Ca. Mail orders to University Activities Board, Mc-
Kenny Union, Ypsilanti,. Michiaan.

L

THE FALL

WON'T YOU

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"'IF

Announcing our March Schedule
All films in Aud. A, Angell Hall
75c

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March 12, 13, 14-Thurs., Fri., Sat.
BONNIE AND CLYDE
starring Warren Beatty and Waye
directed by Arthur Penn

7 & 9:30 P.M.
Dunaway

COME IN?
STUDENT
LIVING
QUARTERS
1217 S. UNIVERSITY
662-6591

Si

MODEL

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Tonight

FREE

Tonight

100

March 20, 21-Fri., Sat.
DR. STRANGELOVE 7 & 9:30 P.M.
starring Peter Sellers, George C. Scott
directed by Stanley Kubrick

POETRY READ BY
Tom Fitzsimmons
at the
ARK
Mr. Fitzsimmons has been published in "Ever-
green," "Sat. Review," "New Republic,"
"Floating Bear," "Goliard," etc., and will be
reading selections from his
"CELESTIAL MENU"
and
"THE BIG BAROQUE BUBBLE BLOWER"

SPEAKER
The World's
Second Best
Reproduction
System
HI-F BUS
Ann Arbor-East Lansing
618 S. Main 769-4700
"Quality Sound Through
Quality Equipment"

March 22-Sun.
GUNGA DIN
starring Cary Grant, Douglas
and Sam Jaffe as Gunga Din
March 27, 28-Fri., Sat.

7 & 9:30 P.M.
Fairbanks, Jr.,

BEDAZZLED 7 & 9:30 P.M.
starring Dudley Moore, Raquel Welch
Sin and satire in English style
March 29-Sun.

REBECCA
starring Sir Laurence Olivier
directed by Alfred Hitchcock

matinee-1 & 3 P.M.

In April: PETULIA, ROBIN HOOD, SALESMAN, FACES, LA
GUERRE EST FINIE
Watch the Daily for announcements of dates and times

RADICAL FILM SERIES
presents
THE EX TERMINA TING ANGEL
directed by LUIS BUNUEL
In this film Bunuel strips his characters down to their murderous core. Held
by an inexplicable jinx in a sumptuous drawing room where they have
gathered for a dinner party, the whole glittering facade of their social exist-
ence shatters.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 114
7,9,11 P.M. Admission 75c
CANTERBURY HOUSE 330 Maynard
ARMedia

761-1451

at 9 P.M.

1421 Hill

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"IT GRIPPED ME AS STRONGLY
AS ANYTHING I HAVE
RECENTLY SEEN ON THE
SCREEN! A really good movie
about sport! Anyone, whether he
cares about this sport or any
sport, must respond! 'Downhill
Racer' is invigorating... good,
strong, purging stuff!"
-Richard SchickeI. Life kMagazine
"EXHILARATING! A perceptive,
unsentimental portrait of a
young athlete on the make!
Electrifying camera work!"
--Timg e aaine

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* "BRILLIANTLY PHOTOGRAPHED
FOR SPEED AND DANGER! It
cuts among its subject and

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