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March 04, 1970 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-03-04

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Page Eight

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 4, 1970

a SUMMER
eAmamm--m
AT SO'r.sUTHJAMPTO N1 ..
A Students at Southampton College are.
encouraged to actively support and participate
in any positive new effort which seeks to improve
things in this wobbly world.
Of course, Southampton, with its delightful summer
climate, offers countless opportunities for
lighter types of involvement, too... like
art colonies... andother activities which make
Southampton a synonym for what summer
should be all about.
This summer.., be where it is.
Southampton College.
TWO FIVE-WEEK SESSIONS TWO FOUR-WEEK WORKSHOPS
June 22-July 24 IN SCULPTURE, CERAMICS,
July 27- August 28 PAINTING AND FILMS
Concerts and lectures wilt
SACCREDITED UNDERGRADUATE be given by resident musi-
COURSES IN4 HUMANITIES * SCIENCE cians and visiting experts.~
4 " SOCIAL SCIENCE " MARINE SCI- D-o
ENCE. EDUCATION plus limited grad- Dremitor ac mod ins
uate offerings,.ore r pnt r vial o tdnsi
visitIng students who are In good academic courses and work-
standing at their own college, shops.
Director of the Summer Program,
. SOUTHAMPTON
. COLLEGE
LONG ISLAND UNIVER1SITY1
- Southampton, N.Y.11968 (516)AT34090 j
Please send me Summer Program bulletin. 1
I am interested in- ] 1st session 0 2nd session1
I attend e
College Year Major 1
Name
Mdt7p
1 CWtyState "zip - I
- -

BATTLE BADGERS:

711' trc
By DALE ARBOUR
This coming weekend, while
most students head home for
Spring Break, Michigan's track
team travels to East Lansing for
the Big Ten Conference Meet.
Until the weekend just past,
Wisconsin had been the obvious
favorite to repeat as the Confer-
ence Champions. But last week-
end saw Wisconsin lose four of
its top runners to injuries, besides
losing the dual meet to Indiana,
76-65. Now, with four of their top
runners disabled and doubtful
starters in the Big Ten Meet, Wis-
consin can no longer be consid-
ered the obvious choice to win.
Other teams which have shown
their strength so far this season
in Big Ten competition are In-
diana and Michigan. Indiana stop-
ped Wisconsin's win streak at 12
with their victory last weekend,
while Michigan got back on the
winning track by smashing Mich-
igan State, 91-59, after losing to
Wisconsin the weekend before.
THE EVENT which will see the
stiffest competition on Saturday
should be' the 60-yard dash.
Leading the pack of entrants are
Michigan's Gene Brown a n d
Michigan State's Herb Washing-
ton with best times of :06.0. Five
other runners with best times of
:06.1 will be close behind these
two leaders, making certain that
they perform at their best.
Michigan's title hopes depend
on best performances from Brown
plus all of the other runners comn-

ck

hopes

brighten

peting for Michigan. Plenty of
competition will be available this
year in the Big Ten, so the Mich-
igan trackmen will have their
work cut out for them this week-
end.
In the 600-yard run, Norm
Cornwell will attempt to repeat his
faat of the past weekend - beat-
ing defending NCAA 600 Champ-
ion Bill Wehrwein of Michigan
State. The job should prove to be
especially challenging to Cornwell
since Wehrwein will be running on
his own track before a partisan
Michigan State crowd. C o r n-
well's earlier victory occurred last
weekend in Ann Arbor.
Another race which is especially
full of competition is the 1000-
yard run. Michigan's Rick Stor-

rey will face stiff competition
from four other competitiors, three
of them from Wisconsin. Only
Mark Winzenreid of Wisconsin
has done very much better than
Storrey this season, and he will
probably only compete in the 880-
yard run, giving Storrey a chance
at the title.
OTHER EVENTS in which
Michigan has strong entries are in
the field events. In the long jump,
Ira Russell has the second best
Jump of the Conference this sea-
son at 24-0. Russell also has the
second best triple jump at 48-1,
and along with Warren Bechard
who was second in the Big Ten
last year, should provide a good
1-2 punch.

in the pole vault, Larry Wolfe
has the best jump of the season
with a leap of 15-6. Ron Shortt
provides a strong second man with
a vault of 15-0 so far this season,
third best in the Big Ten. John
Mann, at 6-10 is one of the top
three high jumpers in the Confer-
ence, and Giulie Catello is among
the top shot putters, with a season
best of 54-31.
quarter-mile.
The action begins on Friday,
March 6, at 6:00 p.m. with the
preliminaries in all events. Finals
start at 12:30 p.m. on Saturday
with the pole vault. Some tickets
(30-40) are still available at the
Ticket Office for Saturday's
action.

BIG TEN WRESTLING:
Will Mean Green be supreme?

-Daily-Dave Beall
Michigan hurdler Godfrey Murray

Lt

By AL KAUFMAN
The Big Ten wrestling cham-
pionships will be held this Friday
and Saturday at Crisler Arena to
honor Michigan coach Cliff Keen,
who will be retiring at the end
of this season after 45 years as
Michigan head coach.
Michigan State is expected to
dull the luster of the event by
walking away with the team title.
Keen, who last year perfectly
predicted the outcome of the Big
Ten Championships, figures that
"Michigan State should be favored
to win, and second should be a
toss-up between Michigan, Iowa,
Northwestern, and Ohio State."
'The dean of Big Ten coaches adds
that "Purdue also has an outside
chance at a high finish."
Michigan State coach Grady
Peninger feels that MSU should
be the favorite to win the cham-
pionship, and is confident that
the Spartan entry in every weight
class can place in the tourney.
In spite of his prediction, Pen-
inger is wary of a letdown. "None
of our boys can get fatheaded,"
he says, and "if Northwesternhcan
get all their kids in there, they
would be a definite threat." If
Northwestern's team continues to
be slowed by injuries, the MSU
coach feels that Michigan and
The Michigan tennis team
opens its season this week with
four games scheduled in Cali-
fornia. The Wolverine netmen
will face USC, UCLA, Stanford
and Berkeley before returning
home on Sunday. The Wolver-
ines will face Wisconsin State
on March 30 in their first home
match of the season.

Iowa will fight it out for second.
From the perspectives of the two
premier coaches in the confer-
ence, it is clear that much will
depend upon the "draw" each
wrestler receives.
The draw is crucial in a tourna-
ment, because a team receives one
point for every win a team mem-
ber chalks up, and two points
for every pin. In addition, the
team receives one; four, seven,
and ten points respectively for
each team member who finishes
fourth, third, second or first.
Michigan will be particularly
concerned with the seeds in at
least seven weight classes, with
the only possible exceptions being
167, where last year's titlist, Mich-
igan acting co-captain Jesse.
Rawls, should not be bothered by
any draw, 142, where Mark King
has been relatively unsuccessful
in Big Ten competition, and 190,
where Jim Thomas faces excep-
tionally stiff competition from at
least five contestants.
The rest of the Michigan line-
up willconsist of Jerry Hoddy
at 118 pounds, Ty Belknap at 134
pounds, Lane Headrick at 150
pounds, Jim Sanger or Tom Quinn
at 158 pounds, Therlon Harris at
177 pounds; and Rick Bolhouse at
heavyweight. Jim Hagan may rep-
resent Michigan at 126 pounds in-
stead of Tim Cech if Hagan wres-
tles well in practice later this
week.
Opposing the Michigan entries
will be one of the finest assem-
blages of wrestlers in the nation.
Big Ten wrestlers placed national-
ly in all but one weight class last
year, and the conference is sub-
stantially stronger this year than
it was last year.
The 134 pound class may be

the best in the conference, as
MSU's Tom Milkovich heads the
field. Included in the bracket are
Minnesota's Reid Lamphere, who
finished fourth nationally at '130
last year, Michigan's Ty Belknap,
who beat Lamphere last weekend,
and Iowa's Don Briggs, who has
beaten Belknap and nearly beaten
Milkovich.
The 150 pound weight class may
be the closest of the tourney, as
none in the conference has been
able to establish dominance. The
probable favorites are-Michigan's
Headrick, green meanie Ron Oul
let, Iowa's Don Yahn, and North-
western's Clyde Smith.
Rawls should repeat as Big Ten
'champ at 167 pounds, with Pat
Karslake from State and Hawkeye
Phil Henning fighting it out for
second and third.
UCLAback,
in top spot
By The Associated Press
UCLA sneaked back into first
place in the Associated P r e s s
rankings of college basketball's
top teams by 10 points over Ken-
tucky - 596-586, although the
Wildcats had 14 first-place votes
to 13 for the Bruins.
Kentucky raised its record to
24-1 Monday night with a 102-81
rout of Auburn.
South Carolina, which earned *
three first-place votes In the poll
of sports writers and broadcasters,
climbed f r o m fourth to third,
switching places with St. Bona-
venture.
The rest of the Top Ten con-
sisted of New Mexico State, Jack-
snilPennsylvania, Iowa, Mar-'%
quette and Davidson.
Jacksonville and Iowa each re-
ceived one first-place vote.

a

Not until you find out just First we have the Octoputer.
how rewarding a career in It combines time-sharing and
Computer'Sales or Systems regular processing in a new
Support is with RCA. remote computer package.
Computer Salesmen at RCA Then we produced Octoputer's
are selling packages that are big brother-Octoputer II. It
eighteen months ahead of the boosts programming efficiency
major competitor. as much as 40%. It tackles

bigger jobs at throe times the
speed. And, it can support over
350 remote terminals.
If this sounds good, you
should know we intend to
double our sales force in 1970.
We also intend to increase
our business at twice the rate
of the computer industry.
Our sales force is drawn from
a variety of majors-a technical
degree is not required-in
fact, one of our most
successful salesmen was a
music major.
Also, you might prefer being)
with a corporation that is
diverse, technologically
sophisticated, and highly
concerned with human values.
If Computer Sales sounds
like your thing-we would
like to talk to you.
Contact your College
Placement Director, or write to
RCA College Relations,
Dept. L, Cherry Hill,
Camden, New Jersey 08101.
We not only believe in equal

XEROX 3c/ Copy
Ease your work load on us over Spring
Break.
We will be charging 3c a copy for our
XEROXING service starting Thurs., March
5 and lasting until Sun., March 8.
Have your copies in by Wednesday and
they'll be ready by next Monday.
UNIVERtSITY M-Th 9-11
STORE F & Sat. 9-5
Sun. 12-5
MICHIGAN UNION

1. UCLA 13
2. Kentucky 14
3. South Carolina 3
4. St. Bonaventure
5. New Mexico State
6. Jacksonville 1
7. Pennsylvania
$. Iowa 1
9. Marquette
10. Davidson
11. Florida State
12. Western Kentucky
13. Houston
14. Drake
15. Notre Dame
16. Kansas State
17. Ohio University
18. Utah State
19. Tie -Cincinnati
North Carolina St.

23-1
23-1
23-2
20-1
23-3
22-1
25-1
17-4
24-3
22-4
23-3
21-2
22--3
20-6
20-
19-6
20-4
19-I

596
586
474
452
348
325 6
291
234
201
149
144
121
77
62
34
304
19
17
13
13

*WCHA Standings

(Closingat 5 This Wed. thru Sun.)

Minnesota
Denver
Michigan Tech
Wisconsin
MSU
North Dakota
Duluth
MICHIGAN
Colorado

WL
17 7
12 °7
10 7.
10 p
10 10
12 13
10 11
10 12
2 16

T
1
3
0
1
1.
0
0

Pct.
.708
.625
.575
.500
.500
.481
.477
.455
.111

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This Weekend's Gam es
Denver at Colorado College
Minnesota at MICHIGAN
Mich. State at Wisconsin
Mich. Tech. at Minn., Duluth

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solution that's big
enough to handle it...

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