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February 26, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-26

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Feb. 26, 27-Thurs., Fri.
CARNIVAL IN FLANDERS
dir. JACQUES FEYDER (1934)
"Feyder's humorous, yet politically commit-
ted re-creation of 17th century Flanders."
7 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
662-8871 75c AUDITORIUM

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
FRENCH PRESIDENT GEORGES POMPIDOU addressed a
joint session of Congress yesterday, discussing the situation in the
Mideast and the Vietnam war.
One member of congress quietly walked out before Pompidou be-
gan to talk, and about 200 members stayed away to protest France's
sale of war planes to Libya.
In his 25-minute speech, Pompidou called for a four-power con-
ference under the auspices of the United Nations to seek peace in the
Mideast. He said France has no intention of favoring one side over
the other.
He made no mention of the sale of planes to Libya.
In discussing Vietnam, Pompidou said, "I know . .. the will to
peace which guides the President of the United States." The end of
the war " will be the most worthy of victories - a victory won first
over oneself," he added.
A FEDERAL GRAND JURY handed down an indictment in
connection with the slaying of United Mine Workers leader Jos-
eph A. Yablonski.
The Cleveland jury indicted Silous Huddleston, a Tennessee of-
ficial of the UMW, on charges of interfering with the rights of a un-
ion member by force or violence, obstructing of justice and conspiring
to interfere with the rights of a union member by force or violence.
Huddleston, 61, is the father of Annette Lucy Gilly, already un-
der indictment in the Yablonski slaying. Her husband, Paul Eugene
Gilly, also is charged in connection with the same offense.
* * *

im4c

trl i ttn

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page three
Thursday, February 26, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

7

Senators blast.
U. S. Military
aid toLaos
WASHINGTON (M - Sen. Charles C. Mathias Jr. (R-Md)
led a bipartisan Senate attack yesterday on increasing U.S.
involvement in Laos. He said it violates congressional direc-
tives and could repeat "the mistakes of our Vietnam involve-
ment."
Democratic Leader Mike Mansfield of Montana and Sen.
John Sherman Cooper (R-Ky) said the Vietnamese war is
increasingly being fought in Laos and Cambodia.
And Sens. Charles H. Percy (R-Ill) and Albert Gore (D-
Tenn) called on the Nixon administration to disclose the U.S.
role in Laos. "The facts of our involvement have been con-
cealed from the people," Gore said.
The debate, conducted in two bursts in a sparsely attend-
ed Senate session, was spark-f

II

I

a

STATE SUPREME COURT JUSTICE John M. Murtagh
recessed a pretrial hearing in the New York Black Panther
bomb conspiracy case indefinitely.
Murtagh said he would not resume proceedings until the 13
defendants promised to behave in court and end their "contemp-
tuous conduct." "I've been called a pig once too often," he declared
after one of the defendants shouted "racist pig" at him.
Since all of the Panthers are in jail in lieu of high bail, Mur-
tagh's formula for peace in the courtroom condemned them to re-RomeU iversity troube
main indefinitely behind bars, without hope of eventual freedom Students at Rome University walk past squads of riot police
through the trial process. To a degree, it served the same purpose as stationed .on the campus following yesterday's violent clashes
a contempt of court sentence. between rightist and leftist student factions.
The 13 Panthers are charged with conspiring to murder police-__
men and bomb New York City police stations, railroad installations,
department stores and other property. No trial date has been set. ENACT LECTURE:

=It is the story of a
young girl who is,orwas,
curious about politics,
nonviolence,Zen,
commitment, socialism,
other Swedes,
and,-to e sure,
sex. It is a serious
filmwith anoble
theme, and, in
dramatic terms,
it is original...
It not only
tells uswherewe've
been heading sexully,
it shows us where
we've been.'
LeonardGE
LOOK MAGAZINE

THE JURY in the Algiers Motel trial began deliberations.
The all-white jury must decide whether three white policemen
and one black private guard should be convicted under an 1871 civil
rights law of conspiring to intimidate eight black youths and two
white girls during the 1967 Detroit riot.
The defendants are accused of conspiracy to deprive 10 occu-
pants of the Algiers Motel of their civil rights by beating, threatening
and intimidating them during a search for snipers reported in the
area.
If convicted they face a maximum penalty of 10 years in jail and
a $10,000 fine.
** *
A SPECIALIST in population control said suspected compli-
cations from birth control pills are secondary to the medical and
social dangers of pregnancy.
Dr. Alan F. Guttmacher, head of the Planned Parenthood Asso-
ciation, told a Senate'monopoly subcommittee that its hearings on the
safety of the pill have spread "unwarranted and dangerous alarm"
throughout the world.
Nearly all side effects are unimportant or reversible, he added, and
the only proven complication that can be fatal is blood clotting.
Guttmacher said that pregnancy claims more lives than blood clotting
each year.
* * *
THE SUPREME COURT extended the one-man, one-vote
rule to all governmental bodies that perform normal governmental
functions-,including local school boards.
The decision requires that when officials are elected by districts
the districts must be as nearly equal in population as practicable.
The new ruling dealt with the junior college district of metro-
politan Kansas City. Under Missouri law, Kansas City was entitled
to three trustees-half the board-though its population ranged
from 59.49 to 63.55 per cent of the district.

Speaker calls for
changed priorities

By MARK DILLEN
"We must change our national'
priorities," Ron Linton declared
last night in the kick-off address
of the ENACT-sponsored series of
environmental lectures.
Linton, former chairman of the
Task Force on Environmental
Health, called first for a change in
the national philosophy towards
treating environmental problems.
"Modern man has abused his
environment more in the past one
hundred years than his predeces-
sors did in thousands of years,"
Linton said. "We must have a new
approach based on the idea that
impairment of environment is
man's last, not first, distress sig-
nal.
"We must treat the disease it-
self, not the symptom," he said.
The first necessary step, ac-
cording to Linton, was to "think
in terms of $50 billion in the next
decade" for combating pollution.
Linton added that environment-
al problems were closely tied with
social problems and that these

THE EVERGREEN FLM PRESENTED BY GROVE PRESS STARS LENA NYMAN.
A SANDREWS PRODUCTION DIRECTED BY VILGOT SJOMAN.
ADMISSION RESTRICTED TO ADULTS.

problems must be tackled collec-
tively.
Pollution is only a part of en-
vironment, he said. But the com-
bined problems of pollution, dan-
gerous food and consumer pro-
ducts, overcrowded housing, in-
adequate education, and unem-
ployment "are the gravest threat
to America today."
In improving our environment,
he said, "housing should receive
.top priority." Linton aserted that
poor housing is directly related
to social and physical ills.
Linton proposed a four point
plan "to set up alternatives" to the
present situation including:
-Developing a population pol-
icy. According to Linton this pol-
icy should include public family
planing services for everyone.
-Exploration of the possibil-
ity of planned new towns.
-Restoring the inner cities.
-Predicting the future. Linton
said that use of our country's re-
sources should be planned so that
it is not "at the mercy of power-
fully organized business and labor
groups."
In addition, Linton proposed tax-
ation and regulation as methods
of maintaining control of the en-
vironment. "But this system will be
to no avail," he said, "if the taxes
are not high enough, if the system
is unenforceable, or if industries
are able to simply pass the tax
on to the public."
"We must meet such problems
as jobs, equality, responsive poli-
tical institutions, and freedom for
all. Otherwise, our victory will be
hollow-very hollow."

ed by apparent concern over
the failure of U.S. planes to
stem an offensive by North
Vietnamese and Pathet Lao in
Laos
"The Senate cannot ignore the
storm signals that are flying this
morning," Mathias said.
"U.S. military activities in that
country clearly violate the spirit
of bo th the National Commit-
ments Resolution - requiring
specific congressional approval for
every new engagement of Ameri-
can troops abr o ad - and the
amendment to the Defense Ap-
propriations Act prohibiting use
of funds f o r American ground
combat troops in Laos or Thai-
land," he charged.
He cited "news reports from
usually reliable publications" that
refer to the presence in Laos of
hundreds of ex-Green Berets,
military advisers "swarming over
the country in numbers propor-
tionately larger than the Ken-
nedy administration commitment
of advisers" in Vietnam in the
early 1960s, and the B52 raids.
Mathias in a theme picked up
by other speakers said "It would
be a cruel disappointment of
President Nixon's hopes for peace
if success of Vietnamization in
South Vietnam depends on esca-
lation of the U.S. engagement in
Laos."
That prompted Mansfield to say
that if U.S. involvement contin-
ues to develop, "All the plans for
Vietnamization will go down the
drain and we will find ourselves
in a most difficult situation."
He said "There has been a de-
cided shift to Laos and Cambodia
from Vietnam itself" and said the
administration should concentrate
on speeding up U.S. withdrawals
from Vietnam.
Cooper noted Nixon's efforts to
get the United States out of Viet-
nam and said "I do not see how
we can get out of that situation
by becoming involved in another
war."
Cooper said he plans to offer
amendments to appropriations
bills "that will proscribe any kind
of involvement in war in Laos."
Mansfield suggested that Brit-
ain a n d the Soviet Union, co-
chairmen of the 1954 Geneva
Conference, might be able to do
something about the situation in
Laos.

Escalation
tests U.S,.
Asia plan
WASHINGTON (A) - The first
serious test of President Nixon's
new, low-profile Asian policy may
now be shaping up in Laos where
North Vietnamese troops are push-
ing a major offensive against re-
treating forces of the U.S.-backed
government.
For years the Communists have
staged offensives in Laos annual-
ly in the dry season, but there is
a growing concern that this time
the North Vietnamese forces may
strike for larger objectives. Some
authorities here think, for exam-
ple, they may aim at upsetting the
neutralist government of Premier
Souvanna Phouma a n d moving
into territory which would pose a
threat to Thailand.
The view that the 1970 Com-
munist drive will be different is
not unanimous in the government.
State Department officials seem
to be more concerned than those
in the Pentagon. Military men say
they are skeptical of any great
new development and rather ex-
pect, as one put it, "more thrust
and counterthrust as in past
years."
What is strikingly different
about the situation this year is
that Nixon has said repeatedly he
does not want any more Vietnams
and that he is not only "Vietria-
mizing" that war but is determin-
ed to cut U.S. involvement in Asia.
U.S. officials recognize that
Laos, where this country has no
combat ground forces, is one
place where the Communists
could decide to probe this policy.
Nixon says the United States is
to some undefined extent com-
mitted to support the neutralist
Phouma government and has been
using airpower for that purpose.
What more Nixon could or
would do if Communist pressure
were greatly increased is not clear
and authorities refuse to specu-
late.

Thur.
6:45, 9:00

~'iTHOpUM

fri. 6:45,
9:00, 11:15

-

$2.00 except Friday and Saturday evenings $2.50
persons under 18 not admitted

TWO SHOWS TONIGHT !

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Presented by KENNETH N. NEMEROVSKI
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AND
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READING
FROM PENGUIN
THE PEASANTS OF NORTH VIETNAM. Gdrard Chailand.
The author, a history professor and strong opponent of Ameri-
can involvement in Vietnam, provides the most complete
account available of life in the Democratic Republic of Viet-
C nam. Reporting on his travels through the Red River delta, he
s describes the economic and social organization of the village
communes and records the voices of a people victimized by ,
war, and by thirty years of foreign oppression and aggression.
A Pelican Original. $1.65
2 TESTAMENTS OF TIME. Leo Deuel. The story of how archae-
KZ1: ologists have recovered the lost documents of ages past and
C what these texts tell us of ancient civilizations. A Pelican Book.
$3.45
THE INNOCENT EYE. Arthur Calder-Marshall. The story of the Z
life and work of one of the most unique film-makers In cinema
history, Robert J. Flaherty. With 70 photographs from "Nanook
of the North" and other Flaherty films. A Pelican Book. $2.25
" THE GREEK TRAGEDY. Constantine Tsoucalas. A vivid de-
scription of the present political crisis in Greece and its his-
torical antecedents. A Penguin Special Original. $1.45 ~~

I

SPAGHETTI DINNER
SUNDAY, MARCH 1
2 p.m.-7 p.m.
ANN ARBOR
COMMUNITY CENTER
Adults $2.00, children $1.00
CLONLARA SCHOOL BENEFIT
(A Summerhill Theory School)

VAGINAL DEODORANT
and
CLEANSING TOWELETTE
MY

iA

I

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