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February 19, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-19

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursdcav. Februcarv 19. 1970

:aeTwHEMCHGNAL

Thiirsdnv Fehriierv l~ 1~7(T
* -, . - . -

,

dance

theatre

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

A colorful

Venezuela

All the world is cardboard?

"f Ja

By C. Q. SPINGLER
Folk dances are an expression
of the most essential and crit-
ical elements of a; country's
daily chores and rituals; how a
woman is won, a leader chosen,
the food prepared. Since most
dances of this kind are choreo-
graphed" around a tale, narra-
tive clarity is extremely impor-
tant. The rhythms and move-
ment of the dances must ex-
press the reality and sincerity
that one devotes to the habits
and duties of one's culture, as
well as conveying the basic ele-
ments of the life style of the
culture. It is especially impor-
tant when performing dances
about a culture which is unfa-
miliar to the audience that the
elements of mime, harmony of
costume and visual images be
well defined.
The dance troup from the Na-
tional Institute of Culture and
-Fine Arts of Caracas was faith-
ful to it's country's folklore,

avoiding spectacular theatrical
tricks and presenting the Vene-
zuelan folk culture with charm-
ing grace. They were successful
in accenting t h e qualities of
gentle feminity of the women
and the fun-loving wiry energy
of the men. However, from time
to time, the t r o u p failed to
transmit with sufficient clarity
the details of a particular rit-
ual or custom. (They were, un-
fortunately, hampered by either
a lack of lighting equipment, or
an unfamiliarity with the Hill
Auditorium facilities, and often
performed in semi-darkness or
out of the follow spots destined
to emphasize and enhance the
dancers. Thus some of the wit
and poignancy of the 'dances
was lost through no fault of the
performers.) I was not, for ex-
ample, able to follow the dance
concerning the morning ritual
of making corn bread. Taking
into account that I an not fa-
miliar with the implements

poetry and prose
Raworth: Intensely
human ambiguity

needed for such a task, I would
criticize the performance of the
prima ballerina of the troup,
Yolando Moreno, as the house-
wife called to this duty for fail-
ing to convince me she was a
peasant woman going about her
chores rather than a beautiful
star condescending to the role.
She was, perhaps a bit too spif-
fy, too much a famous dancer,
and too little an accomplished
mime. She relied chiefly on
sound effects to complete her
story rather than on well de-
fined movement.
The costumes were designed
to suggest, if not imitate pre-
cisely the local costumes of var-
ious areas and tribes of Ven-
ezuela. In this they were suc-
cessful, the lack of glitter and
attempts to dazele allow one to
better appreciate the intricacies
of rhythms and movement.
However, I wished at times that
more attention had been paid
to the unification of color har-
monies. Too often, too many
patterned fabrics appearing si-
multaneously made it difficult
to concentrate on the story told
and destroyed the continuity of
the dance.
There was however' one ex-
ceptionally well costumed and
well performed dance. In it the
women wore silk capes of In-
dian patterns which billowed
behind them in marvelous har-
monies of ochre, b r o w n and
green. The dance told the story
of the selection of a young lead-
er by a tribe throdgh battle and
ritual. Ittcombined the best
skills of the company, the use
of local accompaniment, the
color of the South American
Indian costumes, and strong
choreographic visual patterns.
The blend of live instrumen-
tation, vocal effects with the
dancing (the company boasts a
fine tenor, an excellent harpist,
and exciting drummers) all con-
tributed to an effective presen-
tation of the moods and tenors
of Venezuelan f o 1 k art, and
demonstrated t h a t the com-
pany's strong points were those
essential to a successful defini-
tion of the life and style of it's
country's folk culture.

By JOHN ALLEN
During the afternoon on Wed-
nesday there were helmeted
police by the carload on East
University, live and in the flesh.
Maybe that's why Susan
Shaw's play, Esperanza, which
had its premiere around the
corner in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre Wednesday night, seem-
ed so labored and irrelevant.
Cardboard characters spout-
ing cardboard lines out of the
corner of their cigar-laden
mouths don't have a prayer
against the living theatre of
the absurd that is our wilder-
ness reality. Miss Shaw's little
diatribe against Ugly Americans
and uglier revolutionaries in
San Alfonso, South America, has
a decent set of targets. But the
penetration of her play is the
dramatic equivalent of a mus-
tache pencilled in the dark
across a recruiting poster -
neither meaningfully angry nor
original.
To give credit where due,
however, the play is not with-
out a measure of craft. It has
a consistency of tone, a fair
command of three-act structure,
and no loose ends that are par-
ticuarly irksome. And it prob-
ably reads better than it plays.
What it lacks is life and sub-
stance.
The plot, very briefly: word of
a revolutionary hero named Es-
peranza reaches the U.S. Am-
bassador's office in San Alfonso.
Consternation on the part of
the American wives-in-resi-
dence. Chaos on the part of
the local army. Esperanza's
bloodless coup. Sudden ironic
revelation : Esperanza is a rat-
fink revolutionary with a law
degree from Harvard who plays
chess instead of golf-and whose
chief desire is not liberation for
his people but his own private
slice of Foreign Aid. U.S. Am-
bassador decides to bone up on
his chess andl pack away his
golf clubs for a while. Curtain.
Most of the time it doesn't
actually hurt, but it never real-

ly feels very good, either. Like
riding in a jeep. The produc-
tion itself is rather jeeplike:
four-wheel drive, no trim, no
padding, good at plo w in g
through the muddy places and
taking uphill slopes, but hard-
ly the thing for impressing your
date with.
Costumes, for once, become
something of a villain. The
Naval Attache, played by Jeffrey
Allen, is outfitted in Early Bag-
gy. It has the curious effect of
making his gestures look like
those of Charlie Chaplin trying
to keep his pants on in a crisis.
Esperanza himself, played by
Michael Firestone, would have
brought back clothes from Har-
vard Square that were either
twice as conservative or twice
as wild, depending on which side
of the Square he shopped on.
As a revolutionary he is some-
where between Tice's and Red-
wood and Ross.
Arthur McFarland, at least,
is trim and tapered and ideal-
istic-in his tailoring, his act-
ing, and in his characterization
of Andrew Carlson, the resident
idealist at the American Mis-
sion-er, Embassy.
Sad to say, Frank Bernacki,
who has a central role as the
Honorable J. Cavendish Hill,
United States Ambassador to
San Alfonso, seems to have
missed lesson No. 1 in Elements

of Acting: Do not, under any
circumstances, look around the
audience for your parents and
friends. His habit of eyeing the
audience was either a serious
flaw in his performance or a
surefire way of aggravating one
of this reviewer's major peca-
dillos.
Sharon Jensen, as tne wife
of the Naval Attache, was a
convincing hostess of the kind
whose parties I most dislike.
Her performance and that of,
Lane Lesnick as Consuelo, wife
of the Air Force Attache, were
credible and controlled. Cynthia
Ballard, as a Special Assistant
to the Secretary of Agriculture
in charge of recipe-gathering for
a banana cookbook, was cer-
tainly more convincing than the
character she was obligated to
play. Roger MacPhee and Rich-
ard Stanford carried their
beards and machine-guns with
aplomb.
Everyone, from what I un-
derstand; tends to think he or
she could write a play. It isn't
true, of course. Most people
haven't the necessary persever-
ance. Nonetheless, those w h o
genuinely think they might have
it in them to survive the pain-
ful process of piecing together
a full-length drama, ought to
have a look at Esperanza. It will
give them something to measure
their own hopes against.
Eisenstein's
IVAN THE TERRIBLE
Part 1-Ihurs., Feb. 19
Part Il-Fri., Feb. 20

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. A B Id g., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday, Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r e not accepted for'
publiation. F o r more informa-
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 19
Day Calendar
Physics Lunch Seminar: Phillip
Kwok, IBM Watson Research1 Cntr.,
Electronic Properties of Quantum In-
version Layers in Semiconducts" P&A
Colloq. Rm., 12 noon.
Nuclear Colloquium: R. S. Tickle,
"Weak Coupling" P&A Colloq. Rm.;
4:00 p.m.
Special Colloquium: G. Giacomelli, U.
of Bologna, "Total Cross Section Mea-
surements at Serpukhov" P&A Bldg.,
Aud. E, 4:00 p.m.
Religious AffairsOpen Seminar: "Per-
sonal Explorations". 520 Hill St., No.'3,
6:45 p.m.
General Notices
Grad. Sch. of Business Admin., 1970
Business Leadership Award: Joseph C.
(Continued on Page 8)
17

KEEP AHEAD
Of YOUR HAIR !
. NO WAITING
* 8 BARBERS
" OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Arborland-Campus
Maole Vi ooe
The Best of the'
Underground-Film
Artists
Brakhage, Anticipation
of the Night
Emshwiller, Rezativity
Myitany, Overture
to on Embryo
SAT., FEB. 21, 1970
EAST QUAD,9:00 P.M.
NO CHARGE
More on Sat., Feb. 28
and Sat., March 14

By MARY McNICHOLS
Tom Raworth, a contributor
to the movement which Donald
Hall terms "wborld poetry", de-
monstrated his ability to convey
the emotions of any man in any
country at his poetry reading in
the Undergraduate Library on
Tuesday afternoon. Raworth, a
young English poet, is poet-in-
residence at Essex.
Raworth's poetry is intensely
human. It is questioning, filled
with the ambiguities and ancon-
sisteneies by which he, yes, and
any thinking man, defines life.
But Raworth's poetry is more
than definition - and "solu-
tion" is too strong a word. Rath-
er, it is a struggle; an attempt
,at reconciliation, or, at least, ra-
tionalization. Observing m a n
and his mechanized society, Ra-
worth understands that there
can be, no return to the world of
Shelley and the Romantics. The
lIast line in his work, "Purely
Personal" reads:
"All I see is black
You can recapture nothing."
Raworth abandons any formal-
ized solution, any synthesis of
existing dichotemies, and turns
instead to a poetry which graph-
ically reveals an understanding
of the ambiguities in any man.
is this quality which gives his
Work its power.
Opening the reading with a
poem entitled "Sing," a probable
reference to the traditional role
of poet as muse, Raworth under-
lined his theme of ambiguity.
The. poem moves swiftly and
smoothly, incorporating images
of wind and air which refer
to the inevitable existance of the
mystical in life. These images
run quickly over the underly-
Ing presence of practical act-
uality in his writing. The Real
versus the Surreal. Ambiguity.
Sprfacely, Raworth deals with
many diverse situations, mov-
.ing in his poetry through space
and, time from North Africa to
the Southland to the University
of Essex to a pair of old shoes
now lying somewhere in t h e
kitchen on an English o me.
But every artist continually re-
peats the same story.(Heming-
way wrote the same book three
times under different titles.)
Raworth clearly uses this
technique in his poem "Shoes."
In a fast-moving, successive ex-
plosion of words, he delivers a
work. which appears to describe
the busy, jumbled eternal mono-
tony of life. In the first part of
the.poem, he treats his subject
humorously, describing in detail
the steps involved in producing
one pair of shoes. From the cow
to the tanner to the cobbler to
the wearer. Then he scathingly
undermines his own humor by
suddenly interjecting a line
which relates the end of life.
What has been accomplished by
the monotonous jumble of life?
Nada, Hemingway would say.
Raworth says alienation. Again
he deals with the necessity of
two elements in life. Seemingly
endless monotony must inevit-
ably. evolve to the end.

Raworth's poetry is very well
organized, every poem providing
a connection of images w h i c h
define life as he views it. And
necessarily, tension is always
present. He creates images of
wind and air, then shifts to
small details of everyday human
experience which may then be
overshadowed by hard 'Images
of mechanization or sound. An
excellent example of this tech-
nique is his work "The Others."
In it he employs a tactile wind
image, which is overcome by the,
sound of a piano. The poem ends
with a monologue by the boy's
,mother. The result is a work
dealing with the conscious and
the unconscious, integrating: the
qualities of the real and th e
dream.
Raworth's poetry is analogous
to Henry Moore's sculpture. He
employs Moore's technique of
the organic and the abstract in.
Surrealism, yet always adheres
to the human figure. Even in
his poems dealing with the in-
evitable 20th century theme of
alienation, Raworth interjects
involvement.
Life is, in Tom Raworth's
poetry, a dream. But it must be
rationalized with reality, a qual-
ified dream. He says in one of
his works "A dream only to be
dreamed cannot bring a mo-
ments satisfaction." Raworth's.
skill as a poet brings this am-
biguity home, in Essex, England,
or in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

bk

J~APAN
SUMMER - 4 COLLIGE CREDITS
SAN FRANCISCO STATE COLLEGE
In depth vacation enjoyment and study
of Japan's history, politics, economics,
education, religion and arts. SFSC pro-
fessor administers classes, but lectures
are by leading Japanese educators.
Enroll for credit or as auditor, and re-
quest pass/fail or alphabetical grades.
Price includes Oakland/Tokyo round-
trip via jet charter flight (based on
200% occupancy), firstclass hotels,
train and motor coach Japan travel,
transportation and admission to Expo
'70, extensive sightseeing, guides,
baggage handling, tips, transfers, etc.
Hong Kong optional. Land arrange
ments operated by:

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY
presents ir4 concert
THE DAVE BRUBECK TRIO
featuring
GERRY MULLIGAN
FRIDAY, FEB. 20 8 P.M.
Pease Auditorium, Ypsilanti, Michigan
$3. 50/$3 .00$2. 50
all seats reserved, tickets available at the E.M.U.
Union or by mail. Send check payable to E.M.U. and
self - addressed envelope to University Activities
Board, E.M.U., McKenny Union, Ypsilanti, Mich-
igan (orders received after Feb. 16 will be held at
box office)
COMING MARCH 22: THREE DOG NIGHT!

7&9P.M.
M ultipurpos
Room
UGLI
75c Donation

v

..........

.....

w

DIAL 5-6290
ENDING TONIGHT
Steve McQueeni
The Reivers"
FRIDAY
fo

HOWARD TOURS
OF OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA
APPLY: institute of international
Studies; 522 Grand Avenue, Oakland,
CA 94610

-y

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n

1

P

Sales Service Rentals
FOR FAST, ECONOMICAL
TYPEWRITER SERVICE
BY EXPERTS, CALL
A&D BUSINESS MACHINES, Inc,

"TWO OF THE YEAR'S BEST!"
-Neal Gabler, Mich. Daily

-V,

"Besides being one of the truely
funny sophisticated comedies, it
starred one of the best looking
chicks ever."-Neal Gabler
A VERY INNY,
IMMENSELY APPEALNG MON.
-Vmn-ontca-nbu N.Y.tme:

3022 Packard

0 Ann Arbor, Michigan

Telephone: 313 971-5700

"A 'beautiful' movie. One of the
finest and most immediate adap-
tations of Shakespeare I have
ever seen."-Neal Gabler
"DAZZLING
-LIFE
PARA6OUNT PICTURES perawn
A IEW FILM
FRANCO
ZEFFIRELLI
POrt~uiion of
ROMEO
ULIET

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COMMONWEATH UNiEDrnets
A MARK CARUNER PRODUCTION

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PETER IPAMELA
USTINOVI TFRN
JONATHAN JOHN
WNTERS ASTIN
1 vA
Q COLOR"

From Russia With Love
AUD. A, ANGELL HALL-75c
Fri. and Sat., Feb. 20, 21
Sex and violence in a Turkish mosque
With Sean Connery as James Bond

~' TE~OI~APAAO)TACIR
k~i V,.A.. * ~wa 0 Ia
PIPTHs e b s 5
THURS.-Columbus-7:1 5
Romeo-9 :00
FRI.-Romeo--6:45
Columbus-9:15
Romeo-1 1:00

No ordinary
love story....

.

rrnuiunnt nne a DtDtaiMItiTDiA7fIDC

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TI HNI pLORL

A PARAMOUUN ICTUR

COMING SOON:

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---.

Charlie Bubbles
Bonnie and Clyde
Desi Arnaz and His
Band (due to popular demand)

marimekko
The Spring Dress Collection
celebrates Marimekko's twen-
tieth anniversary by including
a selection of classic Mari-
mekko dresses designed by
Annika Piha during the past
decade together with the
work of two new designers.
ORTHOGONALITY
340 Maynard St., Ann Arbor

Th HlwayInn
East Quad's Coffeehouse & Snackbar
Inexpensive Luncheons, Dinners, Snacks
CONTINUOUSLY OPEN STAGE-
ALL WELCOME TO PERFORM
or Just Come In and Jam
HOOTENANY Thurs., Feb. 19,9 P.M.-All Welcome!
HOURS: Mon.-Thurs.-1 1:00 A.M.-2 A.M.
Fri.-1 1:00 A.M.-3 A.M.
Sat--7 :30 P.M.-3 A.M.
Sun.-3:00 P.M.-1 2 A.M.
Informal Atmosphere, Good Food

Da ily Classifieds Get Results
TICKETS ON SALE NOW !
PTP BOX OFFICE, MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

Continue.,the
Conspiracy I

ARTUR ILLR

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Meeting to organize
March 17-19 actions to
END THEI AR
END THE DRAFT

'A

Investigate
an Independent Sorority
COLLEGIATE
as an alternative to dorms,
apartments, national sororities and co-ops.

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FEB.
24-25

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Room 3KLMN

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Michigan Union

Two Short FREE Newsreel Films

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