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February 17, 1970 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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TATE EndsWed
I h1:00-3:00-!
7:00-9:05
"ONE OF THE YEAR'S TEN BEST"

esday!
5:00-
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-REX REED

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COLOR IJ
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7

n ews to day
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
BRITISH AND SOVIET proposals for outlawing biological
and chemical warfare will have top priority when a 15-nation
disarmament committee reconvenes today in Geneva.
The committee has been recessed for three-and-a-half months
while various disagreements were being settled.
The British proposal would ban biological warfare, while the
Soviet one would ban all biological and chemical armaments, includ-
ing tear gasses, defoliants and herbicides, such as those used in Viet-
nam by the United States.
A COMPROMISE version of the vetoed education and pov-
erty appropriations bill was produced by the House Appropria-
tions Committee.
The committee bill provides $19.3 billion for the Departments of
Labor; Health, Education and Welfare; the Office of Economic Op-
portunity and related agencies.
The bill is $693 million above President Nixon's budget, but $445
less than the bill he vetoed Jan. 28 as excessive and inflationary.
The bill ,however, contains a ban agairst using any of the money
for school integration purposes such as bussing. There is also a pro-
vision which would allow the President to adjust the amounts spent
- thus making the appropriation totals comparatively irrelevant.
These two aspects of the bill are expected to come under heavy
attack on the House floor.
The appropriations for the departments involved are for the cur-
rent fiscal year which began last July 1. These departments mean-
while have been operating under stopgap financing resolutions, the
latest of which expires next week.
* * *
PRESIDENT NIXON set up a Cabinet-level "working group"
to help school districts achieve desegregation.
Nixon said he wants desegregation to be implemented with a
minimum of disruption - whether by bussing or otherwise - of the
educational routines of children.
He would also like to maintain the neighborhood school concept
as much as possible and to insure that desegregation problems are
dealt with uniformally throughout the country.
The chairman of the committee will be Vice President Spiro Ag-
new who will be assisted by Secretary of Labor George Shultz, Atty.
Gen. John Mitchell, Postmaster Gen. Winton Blount, HEW Secretary
Robert Finch, Office of Economic Opportunity Director Donald Rums-
feld and presidential assistants Daniel Moynihan and Bryce Harlow.
CHET HUNTLEY will leave the NBC "Huntley-Brinkley
Report" this summer.J
On NBC's early evening newscast yesterday, David Brinkley said,
"Chet Huntley, on vacation, is in Montana where he announced
today that Aug. 1 he will leave NBC News, and the Huntley-Brinkley
Report, after 131/2 years and go into a private enterprise, the de-
velopment of a big recreational area in Montana."I
Huntley announced his plans for developing a $19.5 million year-
round tourist resort near Yellowstone National Park at a news con-
ference with Montana Gov. Forrest Anderson.p
Huntley said he will leave NBC sometime between May 15 andd
Aug. 1. Initial construction on the resort, to be called Big Sky of 1
Montana, will begin at that time.
ZAMBIAN PRESIDENT KENNETH KAUNDA asked Secretary
of State William Rogers to close down the U.S. consulate ina
Rhodesia. -F
Rogers was visiting Kaunda as part of his 10-nation tour of)
Africa. The Secretary of State said he doubted that the consulate
would be closed, but promised to convey the request to President Nixon.-o

Tuesday, February 17, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

£frti~an

A-A.

Senategru
backs Caswel
WASHINGTON ( -- Judge G. Harrold Carswell's nomi-
nation to the Supreme Court now goes to the Senate after
winning the approval of the Senate Judiciary Committee by
a 12-4 vote yesterday.
The four votes against recommending Senate confirma-
tion of the 50-year-old Tallahassee, Fla., jurist, nominated
by President Nixon on Jan. 19, were cast by Democrats.
Chairman James O. Eastland (D-Miss.), said a majority
report will be filedlimmediately but 10 days have been granted
for preparation of a minority report. This will delay taking
up the nomination in the"

page three

1

"

-Associated Press
The Hershey exit
Gen. Lewis B. Hershey leaves Selective Service headquarters in
Washington yesterday as he retires as head of the nation's draft
system after 28 years in office. See story on this page.
UNION BALLROOM:
Free Huey Coalition
holds ,birthday party

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!
PTP BOX OFFICE, MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

ART HUR MILLERS

8:30
P.M.
* - -
* *
* *
*9

FEB.
24-25

By LARRY LEMPERT
"All the power to all the peo-
ple!''" was the rallying cry Sun-
day night; as more than 250 mem-
bers of the Black Panther Party
and its supporters gathered in the
Michigan Union Ballroom to cele-
brate Huey P. Newton's birthday.
The evening of speakers, films,
and music was organized by the
Free Huey Coalition to raise funds
for Newton's legal defense.
Newton - imprisoned minister
of defense of the Black Panther

.,.
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.. "
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4

FISCAL MATTERS
Colleges, state confer

starring
DOUGLASS WATSON JOSEPH BULOFF
BE"l MILLER CARLE BENSEN
Direte d JOSEPH ANTHONY

Party - is appealing a conviction
for voluntary manslaughter in the
killing of an Oakland, Calif. po-
liceman. The Panthers protest
that Newton's conviction and im-
prisonment is one example of re-
pression.
"That manslaughter charge is
complete bullshit," s a i d speaker
Terry Drye of the Black Berets.
"If they want to put us in jail,
they're going -to have to fight for
it," declared Black Beret G a r y
Wilson. Wilson is one of the "Ann
Arbor Six" now facing trial on
charges stemming from a police
raid on Beret headquarters last
August.
Amar Casey of the Black Stu-
dents Union (BSU) attacked the
University for its allegedly repres-
sive role. "The University doesn't+
educate, the University teaches
you to regurgitate," he said. "It
doesn't broaden your mind, it pro-
grams your mind," he continued.
"We must be seeds among the
people, take root among the peo-
ple, become part of the people,"
Casey declared. He announced+
that BSU, in conjunction with the
Berets, will implement a free
breakfast for school children pro-
gram and conduct a clothing drive
in the Ann Arbor area.
Nancy Kohn, a member of Wo-
men's Liberation, University law
student Ellis Boal, White Pan-
ther Skip Taub, and a representa-
tive from the Detroit chapter of,
the National Committee to Com-
bat Fascism, also spoke.-
The benefit was part of a week
of nation-wide demonstrations in1
support of the Panthers.<

Senate until the end of Feb-
ruary or early next month.
Eastland predicted a 2-1 con-
firmation vote for Carswell, the
second Southerner nominated by
Nixon to fill a Supreme Court va-
cancy that has existed since Abe
Fortas's resignation last May.
Nixon's first choice, J u d g e
Clement F. Haynsworth Jr., of
Greenville, S.C., was rejected by
the Senate in November by a 55-
45 vote after a bitter battle over
judicial philosophy and ethics.
The Judiciary Committee had
backed Haynsworth's nomination
by a 10-7 vote.
All but one of the committee's
seven GOP members, including
Republican le.ader Hugh Scott of
Pennsylvania and his deputy,
Robert P. Griffin of Michigan,
voted to approve Carswell's nom-
ination. Both opposed Hayns-
worth on the final vote.
Sen. Marlow W. Cook, R-Ky.,
passed but will be permitted to
cast a vote within 24 hours. An
aide said Cook had not made up
his mind when the roll was called
at the committee's closed meeting.
The Democrats w h o voted
against recommending Carswell's
confirmation were Philip A. Hart
of Michigan, Edward M. Kennedy
of Massachusetts, Birch Bayh of
Indiana, and Joseph D. Tydings of
Maryland.
Kennedy was one of four com-
mittee members who were absent
but were permitted to vote by tel-
ephone. The committee's rules bar
the use of proxies.-
The virtually solid support of
GOP committee members for
Carswell's nomination contrasted,
with Republican defections that.
played a key part in the Senate's
rejection of Haynsworth.
In the Senate vote on Hayns-
worth's nomination, 17 of the 43
Republican senators voted against
confirmation.
Clarence Mitchell, director of'
the Washington Bureau of t h e
NAACP said the vote "is a kick in
the teeth for those of us who have
sought to quell the fires of racism
among Negroes in the United
States.
"No platitudes and no excuses
offered for the nominee can ever
erase the fact that on this day an
advocate of white supremacy andc
an enemy of civil rights got the
support of an official body of the
United States Senate," said Mit-
chell.

Acting
draft head
- e
appointed
WASHINGTON (P) - Col. Dee
Ingold, a longtime aide to former
Selective Service director Lewis B.
Hershey, was named acting di-
rector yesterday and said he will
attempt no policy changes during
what he expects to be a brief term
in office.
The White House announced
the appointment of Ingold to give
t h e Selective Service temporary
leadership between yesterday's de-
parture of Gen. Hershey, who
headed the draft for more than 28
years, and t h e anticipated ap-
pointment of his successor.
The White House has been seek-
ing a replacement f o r Hershey
since Oct. 10 when it announced
that Hershey, 76, was to be reas-
signed as an adviser to the Presi-
dent on manpower mobilization.
Hershey still was in his office
yesterday morning and met with
Ingold as soon as newsreports ar-
rived of t h e White House an-
nouncement.
Ingold said yesterday afternoon
he had not yet been officially no-
tified of his appointment but had
known of it informally since Fri-
day.
Asked how he feels about his
temporary assignment Ingold said,
"I don't know. How would any-
one feel?"
Ingold, 65, has been assistant
to Hershey specializing in the
management of the 18,864 mem-
bers of local draft boards through-
out the country.
Answering questions, I n g o 1 d
said he thinks President Nixon's
aim of a draft-less volunteer ar-
my "would be an excellent thing
if it can be provided."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day thrugh Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription -rates: $10. by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.
HELD OVER
"Two of the year's 10 Best"
-Neal Gabler, Daily
"A VERY FUNNY,
IMMENSELY APPEALING MOVIE
~ '" anyN Y "~

By ROBERT KRAFTOWITZ
Representatives from the state's1
public colleges and universities
met with members of the state
Senate Appropriations Committee
over the weekend and discussed
the future trends and financial
needs of the state's public colleges
and universities.
President Robben Fleming and
two vice presidents represented the
University at the conference,
which took place Sunday and yes-
terday in Jackson.
The conference was held in
preparation for more specific dis-
cussions between college adminis-
trators and state legislators con-
cerning the state's appropriation
to higher education for the 1970-
71 fiscal year.
This was the first time such a

conference has been held prior to
the formal budget deliberations in
Lansing.
According to Arthur Ross, vice
president for state relations and
planning, the appropriations com-
mittee has scheduled a hearing in
early March to discuss the Univer-
sity's requested state appropriation
to its 1970-71 general fund oper-
ating budget.
Ross and Stephen Spurr, vice
president 'and dean of graduate
studies accompanied Fleming to
the weekend conference.
Among the major topics discuss-
ed were:
-The objectives of higher edu-
cation in the 1970's;
-Methods proposed by the col-
leges for meeting these objectives;
and

-Methods for securing more
educational benefits from current
expenditures for higher education.
Meanwhile, administrators re-
main pessimistic about convincing
the Legislature to approve -n al-
location to the University's gen-
eral fund above the amount re-
quested last month by Gov. Wil-
liam Milliken.
"While it will be difficult to get
more money than the governor
recommended, we certainly plan
to press all the items in our orig-
inal request," Ross said yesterday.
Vice President for Academic Af-
fairs Allan Smith said last week
that a tuition increase is likely if
the Legislature does not approve
an appropriation to the University
which is substantially higher than
Milliken's recommendation.

OPENS THURS. THRU MARCH 15

Th-I

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Knocks The Box
& Other American Fetishes"
" *.. you'll think you never laughed so hard".
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"... more aching laughter than I have heard on
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-Tom Prideaux, Life, 12/19/69
"Go And See
GROOVE TUBE"
--Clive Barnes, N.Y. Times, 10/12/69
"Outrageously Funny"-Cue
*sa wicked and hilarious lampoon of TV pro-
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Presented by KEN NEMEROVSKI
THURSDAY and SUNDAY: 7:30 and 9:15
SATURDAY: 9:45 and 11:30

JOHN BIGGERS-Black Artist
SLIDE LECTURE-AFRO-AMER ART
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Producion of
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8:30, Hill
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