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February 17, 1970 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-17

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Page Two,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 17, 1970

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, February 17, 1970

35 win Nat'l. Book Awards

cinema

f

Thirty-five books were named yesterday
by the National Book Committee as
nominees for the 21st National Book
Awards. These Awards are made annually
in seven categories of literature, "for dis-
tinguished works written by Americans
and published in the United States during
the preceeding year." Announcements of
final Award winners will be made on
March 2nd in New York.
Contenders in Fiction: Fat City by
Leonard Gardner, Going Places by Leon-
ard Michaels, Them by Joyce Carol Oates,
The Collected Stories of Jean Stafford by
Jean Stafford, and Slaughterhouse-Five
by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.,
Contenders in Philosophy and Religion:
Beyond Economics by Kenneth E. Bould-
ing, The Unexpected Universe by Loren
Eiseley, Gandhi's Truth by Erik Erikson,

Love and Will by Rollo May, The Making
of a Counter Culture by Theodore Roszak.
Nominees in Poetry include: False Gods,
Real Men by Daniel Berrigan, The Com-
plete Poems by Elizabeth bishop, The
Secret Meaning of Things by Lawrence
Ferlinghetti, Notebook 1967-68 by Robert
Lowell, and On Bear's Head by Philip
Whalen.
Arts and Letters nominees include: An
Unfinished Woman by Lillian Hellman,
Alone with America by Richard Howard,
Dr. Bowdler's Legacy by Noel Perrin,
Voyager: A Life of Hart Crane by John
Unterecker, and Reflections Upon a Sink-
ing Ship by Gore Vidal.
Contenders in History and Biography:
Present at the Creation by Dean Acheson,
The Limits of Intervention by Townsend

Hoopes, Huey Long by T. Harry Williams,
Zapata and the Mexican Revolution by
John Womack, Jr., and The Creation of
the American Republic by Gordon S.
Wood.
There were nominations as well in the
categories of Translation and Children's
Literature.
Of special interest to the University of
Michigan is the fact that two books on
this year's list of National Book Award
Nominees were published by The Univer-
sity of Michigan Press. The books are
Beyond Economics by Kenneth Boulding
and, in the category of Translation, Andre
Breton's Manifestoes of Surrealism, trans-
lated by Richard Seaver and Helen R.
Lane. Only four of the thirty-five books
nominated were published by university
presses.

'Gaily
By NEAL GABLER
Well, whadya know! It's an-
o t h e r Coming-of-Age-in-the-
Early-Twentieth-Century f iilm
-that genre where the thesis,
Innocence, confronts the anti-
thesis, Corruption, both uniting
in a synthesis, Realization.
Bringing that to the screen,
however, isn't as easy as it
might sound. Along the way the
film must be endearingly charm-
ing and there is nothing more,
unendearing than a film trying
to be endearingly charming.
The innocent this time is Ben.
Harvey of Galena, Illinois. He is
well past puberty and yet star-
tled by the revelation that a
"devil lurks in my bosom." So
Ben, played wonderfully by,
Beau Bridges (who looks like
a youthful Senator Goodell), set
off for the big city, this time
Chicago, to purge the evil from
his soul, an evil which, as you
and I know, is only the primal
passion of the red-blooded male.
In Chicago he is befriended by
a prostitute (Melina Mercouri)
with a heart of gold (naturally),
and he is too naive to recognize
her profession (naturally). Lil
gets him a job with the Chicago
Journal where Ben encounters
Life under the tutelege of vet-
eran reporter and all-around
character, Francis X. Sullivan
(Brian Keith).
Academy
Oscar fno

turning the century

arts

festival

It's the same old story. How-
ever, with this kind of movie
as in most enterprises, there is a
trick to success, and luckily,
Gaily, Gaily, based on the Ben
Hecht novel and now playing
at the State Theater, has found
it. I'll be damned if this isn't
really and truly winsome. While
watching it I couldn't help but-
feel good. I smiled on :cue,
laughed occasionally' and was
generally elated.
That's all very good since
elation should be our reaction
to this concoction. The trouble 4'
with some pictures of the genre,
The Reivers for example, is that
the film-maker seems to have a
sense of guilt in giving the audi-
ence an irrelevant bit of fun.
So he throws in a message guar-
anteed to gum up the works. It's
like putting castor oil in the
coca cola. Norman Jewison, who
directed, Gaily, Gaily, has more
sense. He doesn't strive for re-
levance. Sure, there are hints
every so often, but each scene
is carefully crafted so that no
matter how freely the tear ducts
gush, there is always an uplift at
the end.
For the sheer harmlessness of
it all, Jewison out-Hollywoods
Hollywood. As a matter of fact
the film is so polished it looks
as if it invented smoothness;
Jewison really pours on the var-
nish. But it is more than
innonnces
ominees j

p I

Positively
Ends Wednesday

VIlVIEN LEIGH

DIAL
8-6416

smooth. It is huge as well, and
although I am seldom impress-
ed by logistics, the massivenness
of the spectacle, with its ela-
borate multi-million dollar sets,
made me feel like the little boy
at the carnival.
Which is the way you are sup-
posed to feel when you delve
back into yester-year and es-
cape from Nixon's America. It
won't tell you what's wrong
with the world, but Gaily, Gaily
is fine entertainment, a n d
thank heavens it doesn't aspire

TmI
By DREW BOGEMA
Just who is this dapper stud
with his cool single-breasted
white suit, pinkish-red striped
shirt, charcoal-scuffed bucks,
mother-knitted tie, and purple-
striped socks, whispering soft-
lyrand melodiously through an
unusually crowded auditorium
with a slight Virginia drawl and
quiet humility?
Just who is this dandy T o m
Wolfe? Is he not a man, but
a left-over Greek? An immortal
Homer reborn to discern and
glorify the unrecognized wond-
ers of middle-class and middle-
brow eccentricity? A medieval
epic poet reincarnated with a
feel for the idiom and for style
unmatched by the hack f r e e-
lancers of our day?
Whom else could have en-
titled their art with the friv-
olous sneer that is The Electric
Wool-Aid Acid Test, The Kandy-
Kolored T a n g e r i n e-Flaked
Streamline Baby, and, T he
Pump House Gang?
Whom else could have dis-
covered the likes of Cool Breeze,
the underground motorcycle
crazies of Columbus, the "Noon-
day Underground" of London, or
Bob and Spike, taxicab freaks
turned avante-garde art collect-
ors?
Sunday past Wolfe graced the
Creative Arts Festival gig with
yet another delicious and giggle-
ful series of revelations of
American technological folklore.
Trailing! Not on bikes, but with
the down-and-out white-hairs
and their septic tank crises
("Back to the Bushes For You
and Your Family?") in the wilds
of Northern California! Kings
of the status-phere grooving on
killer-do-it-yourself-h o m e-moat
kits! An industry in Texas build-
ing the tallest smokestack ever
built, over seven hundred feet
high, so high, in fact, that an
engineer has to climb to the
top every day with a gun sight
in order to tell if the bricks were
laid straight! Uniform freaks
with West Point tunics! Multi-
ple-shopping-bag tripsters!
But where have you been
Wolfe? We have suffered t h e
drivel of two quite dry and col-
orless literary seasons since the
publication of your masterful
trilogy, the one that brought
legitimacy of sorts to the hip-
ster, gadgeteer, and freak, clear-
ly established the strung-out,
run-on sentence as an art form
in itself, and dethroned Mailer
as the king of the so-called New
Journalism. Why are you wast-
'Whisperers'
to be shown
The Whisperers s t a r r i n g
Dame Edith Evans will be pre-
sented free of charge Wednes-
day, Feb. 18. The film will be
sponsored by the Institute of
Gerontology, the psychology de-
partment and the Schools of
Public Health and Social Work.
It will be shown at 9 a.m. in
Rackham Amphitheater; 11:15
a.m. in the Social Work Aud.
and at 3:30 p.m. in the Public
Health Aud.
The movie depicts old age apd
that which accompanies it, in a
truthful and touching manner.

to anything more. Ben Hecht,
newspaperman, playwright, au-
thor, director, cool-head, would
have been proud. But what I
want to know is: How come in
all the time I've been living in
the city I have never been be-
friended by a prostitute... with
a heart of gold (as if there is
any other kind)? Maybe we city
lads are supposed to go to the
country to be taken under the
wing of a farmer's .laughter.
There's a movie in that some-
where.

A

Volfe:

A

'dandy

freak
Intellectuals defect from the
19th century image of a well-
developed rational psyche, and
become the new theologians and
believers, not only of values but
of tastes, and turn their camp-
uses into monasteries. Everyone
develops their own "cultural
cache."
The economy jusn't isn't go-
ing to have room for any more
managers, Wolfe says, and is
likely to financially subsidize
freakdom. And, as the birth
rate has invisibly depreciated
over the last twelve years, t h e
problems of Youth Culture today
will be transformed into the Age
of Senility fifty years from now.
We will have a ninety-two year
old President. Corporations will
be ever-anxious to discover th e
eldie on the make.
Three years ago, Wolfe says,
he would have thought mari-
juana would never be legalized,
simply because, law enforcement
agencies, unlike the 'Booze Age
of Prohibition,' had tremendous
moral backing. Today, however,
he thinks arijuana will be legal-
ized if only because "so many
parents with clout are tired of
seeing their sons and daughters
arrested."
Wolfe, however, refuses to play
polemicist, ideological g a m e .
He seems indifferent to politics.
One senses within him a dis-
taste for the simplistic radical
whetoric of the day, if only be-
cause of his incredible vocabu-
lary, sheer sweep of knowledge,
undying curiosity, and boundless
optimism. Tom Wolfe doesn't
tell you, plead with you, or im-
plore you to do anything. This
much, he says, is up to you. And
one doesn't have to' pose t h e
question - "What if he is
right?"
Just thank the cosmos that
Tom Wolfe is very much freak-
ily here.

and MARION BRANDO
IN
The Great Screen Classic
by
Tennessee Williams
and Directed by
ELIA KAZAN
Namned Desre"

....

&.1

HOLLYWOOD .0P) - Midnight
Cowboy and its two stars, Dustin
Hoffman and Jon Voight, were
among nominees announced
yesterday for Academy Awards.
The 42nd annual presentations
will be made April 7. Nominat-
ed with Cowboy for best picture
were Anne of the T h o u s a n d
Days, Butch Cassidy and the
Sundance Kid, Hello Dolly and
Z.
For best actor, besides Hoff-
man and Voight: Richard Bur-
ton in Anne of the Thousand
Days, Peter O'Toole in Goodbye
Mr. Chips and John Wayne in
True Grit.
Nominated for best perform-
ance by a starring actress: Gene-
vieve Bujold Anne of the Thous-
and Days, Jane Fonda T h e y
Shoot Horses, Don't They?, Liza
Minelli The Sterile Cuckoo;
Jean Simmons, The Happy End-
ing and Maggie Smith, The
Prime of Miss Jean Brodie.
Nominated for best supporting
actor: Rupert Crosse, The Reiv-
ers; Elliott Gould, Bob & Carol
& Ted & Alice; Jack Nicholson,
.Easy Rider; Anthony Quayle,
Anne of the Thousand Days and
Gig Young, They Shoot Horses
Don't They?
For supporting actress: Cath-
erine Burns, Last Summer;

Dyan Cannon, Bob & Carol &
Ted & Alice; Goldie Hawn,
Cactus Flower; Sylvia Miles,
Midnight Cowboy and Susanna
York, They Shoot Horses, Don't
They?
Best direction: Arthur Pe nn
Alice's Restaurant; George Roy
Hill, Butch Cassidy and the Sun-
dance Kid; John Schlesinger,
Midnight Cowboy; Sydney Pol-
lack, They Shoot Horses, Don't
They? and Costa-Gavres, Z.
Best foreign language f i1 m:
Adalen 31 Sweden; The Battle
of Neretva Yugoslavia; T h e
Brothers Karamazov Russia; My
Night with Maud French; Z Al-
geria.
Best song: "The Prime of Miss
Jean Brodie;" "Raindrops Keep
Fallin' on My Head" from Butch
Cassidy and the Sundance Kid;
True Grit title song; "What Are
You Doing the Rest of Y o u r
Life?" from The Happy Ending.

Did you know that UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, that
well-known, old-hat, conservative establishment the-
atre has produced more than 125 ORIGINAL PLAYS
in the last forty years? This co-operative program
between UNIVERSITY PLAYERS and the DEPART-
MENT OF ENLISH has involved such literary
figures as BETTY SMITH, NORMAN ROSTEN,
ARTHUR MILLER and CARL OGLESBY
This week UNIVERSITY PLAYERS will present
this year's PREMIERE PRODUCTION-SUSAN J.
SHAW'S
ESPERANZA
ON FEBRUARY 18-21
IN THE
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
AT 8:00 P.M.
Tickets at Mendelssohn Box Office
Mon.-Tues.; 12:30-5:00 P.M. Wed.-Sat., 12:30-8:00 P.M.
Phone: 668-6300
Seats: Wed. & Thurs., $1.50 & $2
Fri. & Sat., $2. & $2.50

vi

ing away your talent and our pa-
tience? What's coming down?
And when?
All we know is what he re-
vealed Sunday. It's to be a con-
temporary Vanity Fair, dealing
in a sometimes autobiographical
way with the freakines of that
massatropolis we all know and
love, namely, New York City. It
won't be out for another year at
least. It may emerge as a novel,
or, then again, as non-fiction.
He came not to speak of his
own ambitions, however, but to
present a vision of American
culture. He has this incredible
hunger, to "somehow encompass
all of America." He also has this
theory, that if you live in any
town in the country for two
weeks, you'll sooner or later en-
counter a unique, distinctive
phenomenon that is worth gett-
ing into.
And so he began a discussion
of Youth Culture - 't'hat beast
of forty fathoms" as imply the
Madison Avenue creeps when
they occasionally request Wolfe's
presence and insight, the times,
he says, when they give him the
naive Cavalry lieutenant stare
to the broad-shouldered rene-

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
gade cowboy (the only who has
come to save the day), the
frightened stare that says in a
glance - "Tell us what those
drums mean!" -
The sixties says Wolfe, saw
the "real me" , phenomenon,
sheer affluence, and oppressive
rationalization of the economy.
Unending tension caused by the
conflict between the subjective
nature of man's needs and de-
sires and the prerequisites of
the bureaucratic world-view
strikes home to everyone be-
cause "it doesn't take too much
intellect to feel the denigrating
status as an interchangeable
part."
Affluence, he says, has creat-
ed enormous numbers of people
who cop-out of the pressure to
conform to the dictates of the
social elite, and, instead, make
their pile only to develop a
status-phere of expertise, pow-
er, or princely luxury. Business
creeps - desperately searching
for the "real-me" outside of
work - look to, identify with,
and emulate the swinger con-
cept as developed by Hugh Hef-
ner. College students turn on
to dope and music and go hip.

'4.
'U

Feb. 17, 18-Tues., Wed.
American Culture Film
THE MALTESE
FALCON
dir. JOHN HUSTON (1941)
Humphrey Bogart mixes
work and romance in a
unsentimental detective
story. Mary Astor, Peter
Lorre.

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