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February 15, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY NIGHT
IS
STUDENT NIGHT
AT THE
AMAD
INN
2800 JACKSON ROAD'
ENTERTAINMENT
BEGINS AT 8 P.M.1
- PRESENTING -
"THE GUILD"
and FOLKSINGER
JOE DICK WINGFIELD

page three

Z t rP

Sii 13an

41,
43 atly

0~554

NEWS PRONE: 764-05
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-C

Sunday, February 15, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

I

the

U. S. bombers fly

supportive

2 Miles West of U of M Campus
COCKTAILS AND GOOD FOOD
1-94 at Exit 172 9 No Cover Charge

"rrr"

news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
PRESIDENT NIXON ANNOUNCED the United States is ban-
ning military production and use of toxins, including snake venom,
food poisons and tetanus.
An administration spokesman said, "I think we are demon-
strating by this that we are serious about controlling the arms
race; that we are prepared to take risks for peace and that we are
willing to forego some seemingly unilateral benefits."
Nixon's statement reserved the right to retaliate inkind if an-
other nation used toxins first against the United States.
AFL-CIO PRESIDENT GEORGE MEANY has blamed Presi-
dent Nixon's anti-inflation policies for the layoffs of thousands
of construction workers and for hurting efforts to hire more
blacks.
At the same time, C. J. Haggerty, president of the AFL-CIO
Building and Construction Trades Department, criticized Nixon's
cutbacks in federal construction. He said unemployment among
construction workers has risen to 8 per cent while the national over-all
unemployment rate is 3.9 per cent.
THE 10TH U.S. CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS in Denver,
Colo., will be asked to decide tomorrow if a federal judge, barred
by federal law from ordering busing of student to achieve racial
balance in schools, can legally change school boundaries so that
busing results.
The case involves a ruling by U.S. District Court Judge Luther
Bohanon in Oklahoma City's public school integration dispute.
"This is going to be a pilot case," commented Leslie Conner,
attorney for the Oklahoma City Board of Education.
S* *
U.S. COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION James E. Allen said
yesterday President Nixon will ask Congress to create two special
organizations to help states solve education problems.
One, a Commission of School Finance, would help states with
financial problems in education. It would report directly to the
President.
The other, a National Institute for Education, would do research
in learning. It would be located in the Department of Health, Educa-
tion and Welfare.

missions for

Laotian

l

v

SAIGON (M - U.S. fighter-bombers are flying combat
support for government forces in Laos who so far are stand-
ing up under north Vietnamese attacks around the Plain of
Jars, informed sources said yesterday.
The weight of U.S. air blows apparently is being felt. Sev-
en North Vietnamese prisoners interviewed in Vientiane, the
capital of Laos, said their greatest fear was bombing attacks.
Five of the prisoners were captured in the plain area.
The United States has never admitted its planes are fly-
ing combat support for the Laotian ground forces. President
Nixon and others have spoken only of U.S. air raids on the Ho
Chi Minh trail in eastern Laos, the main North Vietnamese
infiltration route to South Vietnam.
The sources said scores of U.S."

troops

i

w
r

NOW HEAR THIS-
A LIMITED NUMBER OF
ENSIANS HAVE BEEN
ORDERED.
GET YOURS BEFORE
IT'S TOO LATE

-------------------
MICHIGANENSIAN ]
The University of Michigan ]
JustYearbook ]
SJustreturn this card with $7.00 I
(check or money order payable to]
te MICH IGANENSIAN) to the'
udent Publications Buildigg, 420
] Maynard, A receipt will be sent]
] within 3 weeks after your order is ]
received. I
Name
Ann Arbor Address_
-----.-.--.-.------.-.-J

-Associated Press
Aiken raps Tonkin Resolution
Sen. George D. Aiken; (R-Vt), tells conferees at a foreign policy
symposium in Montpelier yesterday that the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin
Resolution was misinterpreted, and that he would vote for its
repeal today.

'U' CIVIL LIBERTIES BOARD
Policy formed on student files

fighter-bombers fly t h e combat
amissionsfrom a half-dozen bases
in Thailand. They implied that
some planes m a y be using Da
Nang in northern South Vietnam
and U.S. 7th Fleet carriers in the
Gulf of Tonkin.
They added that this did not
detract from the 300 to 400 sorties
a day being flown against the Ho
Chi Minh trail by U.S. fighter-
bombers and B-52 Stratofortress-
es.
American sources in Vientiane
and Saigon expressed belief the
North Vietnamese have begun
their offensive to capture the
strategic Plain of Jars, 50 miles
long and 20 miles wide about 100
miles northeast of Laos.
But this was discounted in Vien-
tiahe by Information Minister
Tiao Sisoumang Sisaleumsak, who
introduced the North Vietnamese
prisoners at a news conference.
He said the North Vietnamese
were repulsed in two attacks on
the plain Thursday and Friday
and lost 80 killed.
Explaining why he did not be-
lieve the offensive had yet mater-
ialized, he said both attacks last-
ed only a few hours and the en-
emy did not try to pursue the ac-
tions.,
Most believe that w h e n the
showdown comes, the Laotiani
government troops will not try to1
hold t h e plain, which controls
roads leading from North Vietnam
into Laos.
It is generally agreed the Lao-,
tian forces will be outnumbered
and that it is better to fight a de-
laying action, although a source
in Saigon said he believed t h e y
could hold the plain if they want-s
ed to pay the price.
As he explained it, the plain is
"just not worth the casualties."
Referring to U.S. plane support,1
he added: "We are going to make
it difficult for the enemy. We
are not just going to walk away
from it."
Most of the U.S. bombing raidsc
have been concentrated around
the junction of Routes 7 and 71,t
the main North Vietnamese in-t
filtration routes.
"These are strong points on thet
hills that overlook the roads,"t
another source explained. "They
are the controlling elements for
getting on to the plain by road.1
The North Vietnamese have cap-
tured most of them, but they still
do not have unrestricted access."

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The
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1-1ULIET

(Continued from Page 1)
-That students have access
to their files in so far as that
access does not violate the
rights of others;
-That information contained
in the records be available to
sources outside the University
only with the written authoriza-
tion of the student; and,
-That the student be notified
immediately when disclosure of
his record is forced by subpoena.
Several of the items includ-
ed in the policy appear to be
quite innovative and potentially
controversial, such as the one
regarding student access to files.,
In practical application, how-
ever, such points are for the
most part modified statements
of existing policies, rather than
drastic renovations, according
to medical Prof. Gerald Abrams,
chairman of the Civil Liberties
Board.
In the student access item,
the inclusion of the phrase 'in-
sofar as that access does not vio-
late the rights of others," pro-
tects evaluations submitted with
the understanding that the in-
formation is being kept in strict
confidence. Present policy, as
emphastically stated in the
Counselor's Handbook, is "In no
case may the student have access
to his file."
The proposed policy will al'ow

mlmi1e,
I ITH POrUM
"COLUMBUS"-Sun. and Mon.
7:15 only
"ROMEO"-Sun. 2:15,
4:45, 9:00
Mon. 9:00 only

a student to review those pieces
of information in his file, the
contents of which he is fully
aware. This would include, re-
commendations solicited by him
for purposes such as appoint-
ments or awards, as well as any
written observations regarding
him which have been inserted in
the file with the understanding
that they may be viewed by
the student.
The board members feel this
distinction between confidential
and non-confidential subject
matter must be maintained.
As a member of both the
Junior/Senior Counseling staff
and the Civil Liberties Board,
Prof. Moore explains the com-
plexity of the problem in this
area:
"The idea of restricted in-
formation is anti-thetical to the
.very ideas of a university. I
for one would prefer maximum
availability of information -
but then the type of information
retained would necessarily be
very limited."
"Certain information must be
made available to those individ-
uals in need -of making judg-
ments," says Moore.
For this reason, he says, con-
tinued restriction of confidential
evaluations is carefully observed
in the board's recommendations.
"There is . no intention to
4> harbor vicious or secretive com-
ments," Moore says.
"But some information if seen
by a student might be considered
revealing," Moore says, "where-
as, as a counselor, I would con-
sider it perfectly innocent and
extremely helpful to know."

How can information be
screened so that only pertinent,
"helpful" data are retained?
"It can only be done," ack-
nowledges Moore, "across years
of experience and hundreds of
students. I do what I do as a
counsellor keeping in m i n d
what was important to me when
I was a student."
That communications are in
constant review is indicated by
both Moore and Assistant Dean
George' Anderson of the LSA
Freshman/Sophomore Counsel-
ing Offices.
Moore recalls an instance
when he saw something in one
file which he considered harm-
ful and irrelevant to the func-
tion of counseling. He notified
the dean of the office who eval-
uated the communication' and
had it removed from the file.
In another case, Anderson
was visited by a faculty mem-
ber who spoke viciously of a stu-
dent and requested that a cer-
tain action be taken against
him.
"I looked up the student's re-
cord," Anderson relates, "stu-
died the counselors' comments
and saw that this faculty mem-
ber's comments were entirely in-
consistent with previous evalua-
tions."
"No action was taken against
the student, and no mention of
the instructor's visit was re-
corded."
According to Assistant LSA
Dean Baker, one of the chair-
men of the Administrative
Board, faculty members a n d
teaching fellows are permitted to
see records only in the pre-

sence of a member of the Ad-
ministrative Board. No under-
graduate students are hired
for clerical work in the counsel-
ing offices.
Since such precautions are al-
ready taken in the handling of
student records, it might seem
that formal statement of proced-
ures is unnecessary.
Not so, says Abrams. "A uni-
form policy statement is need-
ed not as a corrective of abusive
practices within record keeping
offices, for on the whole there
have not been abuses," he said.
"The primary motives behind
the policy is to warn people, in
whatever office they may be,
that there are very strong re-
strictions on what can be shar-
ed."
Anderson favors keeping high
school evaluations saying,
"There are some who feel in-
formation sent by the student's
high school should be exclud-
ed from the files, but this in-
formation is evaluated just as
conscientiously as more recent
evaluations."
The report recommends that
no records pertaining to court
action, race, political or reli-
gious association or convictions
be kept. The only exception to
this proposal, as stated in the
policy, would be information
needed to comply with Depart-
ment of Health, Education and
Welfare regulations on race
statistics.
In regard to court action data,
no record is kept in counseling
offices, according to Dean An-
derson, not even in matters of
student judicial hearings.

d t
Michigan
seizure law
inval
From Wire Service Reports
LANSING - The State Court
of Appeals ruled Friday that a
section of the Michigan Constitu-
tion applying to search and seizure
is not valid because it conflicts
with an amendment to the U.S.
Constitution.
The Appeals Court reversed the
conviction of a Detroit man,
George Cooper Andrews, 42,
charged with carrying a concealed
weapon.
It said Andrews was picked up
last year as a suspect in an area
where a murder had been com-
mitted. He was carrying an un-
licensed revolver in his pocket.
The actual murderers were
caught later, but Andrews was or-
dered to stand trial for carrying a
concealed weapon.
Attorneys for Andrews moved
to suppress the evidence as being
the product of Onreasonable search
and seizure.
The trial court held the evi-
dence admissable under a section
of Article One of the Michigan
Constitution, which says:
"The protection of this section
shall not apply to bar from evi-
dence in any criminal proceedings
any narcotic, drug, firearm, bomb,
explosive or any other dangerous
weapon seized by a peace officer
outside . . . any dwelling house in
the state."
In its ruling the Appeals Court
said this provision is in conflict
with the U.S. Constitution, which
bars any evidence seized without
due cause from trial proceedings.
Chief Judge T. John Lesinski of
the Court of Appeals, in writing
the opinion, said previous opin-.
ions have "set Michigan apart as
the one state in the union refusing
to protect the right of criminal
defendants subjected to unreason-
able search and seizures in this
limited area.
"A review of the record in this
case convinces us that passive ac-
ceptance of the (state) constitu-
tional provision is no longer per-
missible."

Wednesday
"I AM CURIOUS
(YELLOW)"

The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mai. .
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

The case was sent back to Re-
corder's Court Judge Donald Leon-
ard for a new trial.
Arresting officers testified that
Andrew "fit the description" of
one of the murderers in that area,
so they searched him and found
an unlicensed revolver in his
pocket.

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