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February 12, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-12

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American
From Wire Service Reports skis wer
More than 660 youths, including a Saint Jo]
group of 40 from the Boston area, head- sports fa
ed for Canada yesterday amid reports Gerald
that their ultimate destination is Cuba in Saint
where they will harvest sugar cane for Luis Arc
Fidel Castro. in Montr
Reported to be among the group are Cuba.
ten University students some of whom, Ekn
according to a local SDS spokesman, Elkins
have been active in aiding the Castro American
cause both in Cuba and in the U.S. Novembe
Some of the members of the Boston returning
group told newsmen that they were en The re
route to a ski holiday in Saint John, to have 1
Canada. They claim to be members of a given an
group called the "Ski Masters." Havana
They were heavily burdened with ment, C
knapsacks and sleeping bags, but no thousand

Yellow Submarine
starring Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band
Aud. A, Angell Hall-FRI., SAT., SUN.
3 NIGHTS! Feb. 13, 14, 15-i & 9:30
All you need is love and 75c

t in evidence. Moreover, t h e
in area is not noted for winter
cilities.
Elkin, Cuban shipping agent
John, said the Cuban freighter
os Bergnes, was to be boarded
eal by 500 Americans bound for
said he understood that 212
n students who went to Cuba in
r to harvest sugar cane were
aboard the same freighter.
turning students were reported
left Havana Friday after being
emotional mass farewell in
Square by the Cuban govern-
ommunist party leaders and
of workers and school children.

While in Cuba, the students reportedly
cut 12,000 tons of sugar cane.
In Brooklyn, N.Y., the All State Bus
Corp., said the "Ski Masters" had paid
"more than $20,000" to charter buses
from San Francisco, Seattle, Chicago,
Madison, Wis., Cleveland, Detroit and
New York City.
Greyhound headquarters in Chicago
reported five buses involved in the
operation.
One of the busloads has already run
into trouble. A group of 44 young men
and women who claimed to be going
skiing was held up at the Canadian
border near Detroit Tuesday. Customs
officials said the youths were not "bona

rskiers' head

for Cuban slopes

fide non-immigrants" or visitors, and
turned them away. They were expected
to try to enter Canada at another point,
probably at Calais, Maine.
A Greyhound spokesman said the Fed-
eral Bureau of Investigation made
"routine inquiries" when the bus which
had been turned back at the Detroit
border passed through Cleveland Tues-
day. The FBI in Washington had no
comment, however.
A bus from Chicago dropped off about
50 baggage-burdened people in down-
town Boston Tuesday. None would iden-
tify themselves. The 50 hurried to a
nearby subway station and took a train
for Cambridge, where the American
Friends Service Committee took on the

chore of finding temporary housing for
them.
A spokesman for the Friends Com-
mittee identified them as members of
the "Venceremos Brigade." The Spanish
word "venceremos" translates as "We
will conquer."
"We're just going skiing in Canada,"
one youth told a newsman, "but other
than that we don't have anything to
say to you."
Reports have it that the "skiers" will
be spending two and a half months har-
vesting sugar cane.
The Fifth Estate, an underground De-
troit newspaper, said in its current edi-
tion that the Cuban government would
pay costs for Americans who want to
go to Cuba to harvest sugar cane.

THE BEATLES

I d,

COMING: FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE

1

pagethre NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS RHONE: 764-0554
Thursday, February 12, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

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SHOWS AT:
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COLOR
United Arhsts

w'

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
DEFENSE ATTORNEYS for Lt. William Calley Jr., are press-
ing for dismissal of all charges against Calley on the grounds of
"command influence."
Calley is accused of murdering 102 Vietnamese civilians at My
Lai, South Vietnam, in March 1968.
Civilian George Latimer, Calley's chief defense counsel, and Maj.
Kenneth Raby, his military lawyer, yesterday claimed there had been
influence from President Nixon down through the military chain of
command on the decision to prefer charges against Calley. The Su-
preme Court has In the past reversed convictions when command In-
fluence has been proven.
The defense asked that Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird, Sec-
retary of the Army Stanley Resor and Army Chief of Staff General
William Westmoreland be called to testify in regard to the command
influence charge. The motion was denied until the three officials have
been interviewed by' the defense.
* * *
SECRETARY OF STATE WILLIAM ROGERS conferred for
75 minutes yesterday with President Tito of Yugoslavia in Addis
Ababa, Ethiopia.
American officials said almost half the meeting was devoted to
the discussion of the Middle East conflict. Both Rogers and Tito
agreed there should be an effort to halt arms deliveries to both sides
in the conflict.
In discussing Africa, Tito and Rogers again were in agreement,
feeling that the African countries should be nonaligned with any
other power bloc or security pact.
Rogers had requested the meeting with Tito in order to take ad-
vantage of the Yugoslav leader's presence in the Ethiopian capital
beforerboth continue their African tours. Rogers described the meeting
as "very useful."'
THREE ARABS, two of them injured and hospitalized under
police guard, faced murder charges yesterday after a terrorist
attack on passengers of an Israeli airliner.
One man was killed and 11 persons were injured, including two
of the attackers.
Police said it was unlikely that the Arabs were after Assaf Dayan,
the son of Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Dayan, who was among
the passengers but was not hurt.
Hermann Haering, chief of the Munich Police Department's crim-
inal division, said one ofhthe attackers was standing next to young
Dayan and could have shot him easily.
Dr. Lsasam Araatawi, leader of one of 2 Arab groups which claim
responsibility for the attack, claims the purpose of the operation was
to kidnap certain Israelis and to hijack the plane to an Arab airport.
ARAB GUERRILLAS assailed the Jordanian government yes-
terday for barring civilians and irregulars from carrying and
storing arms and accused King Hussein of making peace moves
toward Israel.
Al Fatah, a leading guerilla organization, interpeted the ban as
being aimed directly at Arab guerillas and said Jordanian authorities
were "attempting to stab the Palestinian revolution in the back."
Al Fatah said in a statement issued in Cairo that all Arab guer-
rilla movements would unite to resist the Jordanian arms restrictions.
It also warned that the Arab people in Jordan would not accept dis-
armament of the guerrillas and said the Jordanian army would stand
with them against the government.
In a joint broadcast from Cairo, the Palestinians also demanded
a joint declaration from the leaders of the five Arab nations who at-
tended the "confrontation conference" in Cairo that the Jordanian
move was not the result of secret negotiations.
Jordan, Egypt, Syria, Sudan and Iraq attended the 'conference
that ended Monday.
SOUTH VIETNAMESE MILITARY COMMANDERS say they
believe they have spoiled a large North Vietnamese offensive in
the Mekong Delta.
This opinion emerged yesterday after six days of fighting in the
strategic Plain of Reeds, 60 miles west of Saigon. The plain is the
western gateway to the delta's heavily populated center.
More than 200 North Vietnamese were reported killed as of yes-
terday and at least twice that number were presumed to have been
wounded. South Vietnamese losses were listed as 17 killed and 24
wounded, according to South Vietnamese sources.
Allied Commanders had been expecting a major North Vietna-
mese drive into the delta since four North Vietnamese regiments in-;
filtrated across the Cambodian border late last year.;

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Protesters line Liberty Street in yesterday's noon-time peace vigil.
DRAWING METHOD UNFAIR:
Suit challenges randomness
of Selective Service lottery

Protesters
hit draft,
militarism
Local groups
hold peace vigil
at draft office
By DAVE CHUDWIN
About 40 people took part
in a quiet noon - time peace
vigil outside the Ann Arbor
draft office yesterday to urge
an end to the draft, the Viet-
nam war and military influ-
ence in American society.
The protesters lined Liberty )St.
passing out peace leaflets for an
hour. No attempt was made by
the group as a whole to enter the
second-floor Selective S e r v i ce e
headquarters.
However, five of the demonstra-
tors went inside to give one of the
clerks letters addressed to mem-
bers of the local draft board ask-
ing for an end to draft.
"We believe our society has been
overcome by a military ment'al-
ity," the letter said. "We come to
reaffirm our responsibility to work
for peace"and freedomanddOur
dedication to life."
The combined vigil and fast was
sponsored by the Michigan Coun-
cil to Repeal the Draft and i-
terfaith Council for Peace. The
action was the first in a series of
Wednesday protests at the draft
office that will continue through
Passover.
The local effort coincided with
demonstrations outside the White
House and other federal buildings,
across the country, said Mrs. Bar-
bara Fuller, one of the organizrs
of the vigil.
"We don't have a n y illusions
that these vigils will end the war,
but we feel a responsibility to say
'no' to the war, the draft and the
military attitude t h a t pervades
the nation generally," she explain.,
ed.
Thp group, which included stu-
dents, professors and Ann Arbor
residents, marched from the In-
terfaith Council for Peace office
at 602 E. Huron to the draft of-
fice, located at 103 E. Liberty.
They carried signs which said
"Repeal the Draft," "Militarism
diminishes freedom" and "W h o
owns a man's life?"
"On the whole we don't do this
as political scientists, but as peo-
ple dedicated to peace under
God," Rabbi Bruce Warshal said.
John Bailey, professor of Near
Eastern languages and literature,
said he was participating because
he does not believe the Nixon ad-
ministration plans to completely
withdraw U.S. forces from Viet-
nam.
"We come here united against a
continuing United States res-
ence in Vietnam," he explained.
"I'm a CO," said one of the stu-
dents who took part in the vigil.
"I'm against war, and can't kill."
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of,
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 'by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

From Wire Service Reports
SAN FRANCISCO - Seven po-
tential draftees have filed suit in
U.S. District court against the new
Selective Service system, alleging
that the lottery drawing held Dec.
1 was biased.
The seven filed the suits on be-
half of themselves and all regis-
trants of the Selective Service sys-
tem who "received a random se-
quence number of 122 or less, and
whose birthdays f a 11 in the
months of Septmeber, October,
i Tn~nmhn nr Tnnnm nr"i

The suit said the drawing did
not result in a random selection
and that they were thereby de-
nied due process of the, law in
violation of the U.S. Constitution.
The potential draftees sought
writs prohibiting any more induc-
tion notices and canceling those
presently- outstanding.
They also asked for an order by
the court requiring national Se-
lective Service Director Lewis
Hershey to conduct a new draw-

II

Novemner or iDeemer. i . ing.
Anthro Club sponsors

Now
PLAYING

NATIONAL GENERAL-CORPORATION
FOX EASTERN THEATRSS
FOR VILLGE
375 No. MAPLE PD. -769-1300

TIMES.
MON.-FRI.
7:10-9:05

DUSTIN HOFFMAN
MIA FARROW
"JOHlN AND'AR

benefit for
By PAT MEARS
The Anthropology Club is spon-
soring a benefit tonight at Canter-
bury House to raise money for
eight faculty members of Simon
Fraser University in Vancouver,
British Columbia. The eight are
facing dismissal charges for their
participation in a student strike
last September.
The strike arose after the-Simon
Fraser administration refused to
consider some departmental rec-
ommendations on tenure, renewals
and promotions because students
had helped to make the recom-
mendations. Consequently, the
elected chairman of the Political
Science, Sociology and Anthro-
pology Department was removed

professors
by the Dean of Arts. An adminis-
trative trusteeship of six professors
from outside the department was
then established to direct the de-
partment,
As a result of these new com-
mittees' efforts, a full professor,
and an associate professor were
denied tenure or further appoint-
ments.
These denials of tenure and new
contracts were. a "political purge,"
according to anthropology Prof.
Joe Jorgenson. He states that
"about two-thirds of the twenty-
one faculty members at the time
were 'leftists' in terms of their
political economic orientations."
The money collected at the
benefit will be used for lawyer's
fees and the preparation of legal
briefs in the dismissal proceedings.
The benefit wil be held from
8 to 12 p.m. tonight. Bob Sheff
and the Carnal Kitchen are sched-
uled to perform and a special
mixed-media feature will be pre-
sented during intermission.

Filed with the suit was an affi-
davit by several statistics experts,
including three Stanford Univer-
sity professors, Charles Stein,
Ingram Olkm and Bradley Efron,
who said:
"It is our opinion t h a t the
method employed ignores the ad-
vice of " 11 standard statistical
textbooks."
"It is common knowledge among
reputable statisticians that it is
difficult if not impossible to ach-
ieve a random sample by physical
mixing, and that conclusion has
led to development of tables of
random numbers and random per-
mutations."
Approximately 850,000 men are
included in the pool created by
the Dec. 1 lottery. Pentagon offi-
cials have -said about -290,000 of
these men will enlist, filling 54
per cent of the projected quotas.
This leavesf560,00 men eligible
for the draft and about 250,000
are likely to face induction if no
changes occur in the national sys-
tem.
Just eight days after the lottery
Col. Arthur Homes, Jr. the head
of the State Selective Service-sys-
tem, announced that many Michi-
gan men with 1-A draft classifi-
cations can expect be drafted this
year-no matter how high a num-
ber they drew in the lottery.
A Selective Service official in
Washington later confirmed that
some areas would draft all 1-A
men and Holmessaid Michigan
was one of those areas.
The regional variation results
from the way the lottery is used.
Each board is assigned a certain
quota each month and uses the
lottery ranking to determine which
men it will draft and which it
won't. One board may run through
all it's 1-A's long before another
does.

SAT. AND SUN.
1:30-3:20
5:15-7:10-9:05

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SUSPENSEFUL

13th-11:30 ONLY
AND MEANINGFUL
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THURSDAY

12:00 NOON

MICHIGAN UNION

(Rm. No. 2, South Side Basement Cafeteria)

CAMPUS

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