100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 12, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Thursday, February 12, 1970

_ _ , . - _

music
Beethoven celebration:
Exce lent performance

I

-poetry and prose

Squires: Trans-world dynamism

By JIM PETERS
I have not heard the Univer-
sity Symphony Orchestra per-
form for more than six months,
and it was good to hear them
again, sounding so well. Last
night at Hill Aud., maestro
Joseph Blatt presented a major
concert celebrating the Beet-
hoven year; and it was a cele-
bration, feting important music
with superlative playing.
The\history surrounding the
Eroica\(Symphony No. 3 in E-
flat Major, opus 55) with its
dramatic title change and tur-
bulent, often-discussed "p r o-
gram" tends to diminish the fact
that it is a turning point in
Beethoven's development; the
first "modern" symphony.
Trimmed to a size I have not
seen it at before, the Symphony
responded with precision to
Blatt's, knowledgeable interpre-
tation. The first movement,
marked allegro con brio, is de-
veloped; carefully and delibe-
rately, leading to a complete
coda without rondo "overtones."
From the balanced differenti-
ation of the winds to the accents
of the brass, Blatt's goal of or-
chestral texture was xealized
splendidly. As is usual in Hill,
the horns tended to be over-
bearing in concerted sections,
but I doubt if a simple diminu-
endo would have been the an-
swer.
The strings of the orchestra
have always been problematic;
but although they were unsure
in .the opening, the ensemble
held strong all evening. The
texture was occluded during the
intricate development by some
string sloppiness, yet Blatt never
lost control.
The Marcia Funebre's tempo
was excellent and kept the vary-
ing sections moving well; I felt,
perhaps, a certain discontinuity
in part, but this was offset by
the sustained tension within the
orchestra. If their vigor began
to wane near the end, it was
from hardwork's exhaustion and
not disinterest.
The third movement was too
slow, in terms of itself and of
the power of the two which
preceeded; but, though not al-
legrovivace, it was brisk enough
to carry the movement intact.
The horns were sound. in the
trio, and their good sense of
dynamics molded the sure melo-
dies to contrast well with the
pace of the sclerzo.
The variations of the finale
were uneven, due, I think, to the
lack of declative clarity in the
lower strings. The first should
be a spinning and weaving of
string sounds, and Blatt's tempo
here prevented this. But from
the fine entrances in the fifth
variation through; the building
poco andante and into the sud-
den presto, the power and sensi-
tivity were all there.
Beethoven's Concerto for Vio-
lin in D Major, opus 61, pro-

vided an interesting comparison
to the Eroica. . Soloist Angel
Reyes was skilled and attent-
ive to the melody's line, build-
ing the intensity and shaping
the harmonies; but the first
movement was very dull.
Although his tempo was not
debilitating, Blatt preferred to
parry the whole orchestra
against Reyes' lines instead of
concentrating on the texture I
had felt earlier. This is, indeed,
valid, but I find it hardly in-
teresting. The cadenza was well-
crafted and not at all theatrical,
and the only criticism I would
offer is that often Reyes' dyna-
niics are vague.
This was true in the second
movement where, contrasted to

the crystalline horn wind en-
trances, his Beethoven seemed
too warm-too intense. And it
was not until the canzona-like
section with pizicato strings that
his "Italian" approach seemed
appropriate.
The rondo was r e a c h e d
through a beautifully executed
transition, and here Reyes, Blatt
and the Symphony Orchestra
had no disagreements. The ca-
denza's double-stopping thema-
tic fantasizing had all the re-
quired strength, leading to the
cadences of the close.
If this anniversary of Beet-
hoven's birth can inspire such
dedication and enthusiasm as
last night's, we have many holi-
days to enjoy in the years ahead.

By RON BRASCH
As a poet and man, Radcliffe
Squires is a sensitive craftsman.
In Tuesday's reading at the
Undergraduate Library, Squires
exhibited great style and abil-
ity as his dynamic poetry con-
veyed the audience from mood
to mood.
Squires, a University profes-
sor, is truly an underrated
artist in a field where too often
applause is granted showman-
ship, rather than talent. His
conservative suits and subtle
nuances create the appearance
of an aloof scholar, more than
anything else. And indeed, this
is also what Squires is, with
work that includes major liter-
ary studies on Robinson Jeffers,
Robert Frost and Allen Tate.
Among his several volumes of
poetry are The Light Under
Islands, Fingers of Hermes, and
Daedalus.

Opening with "Friendship," a
r a t h e r humorous, childhood
drama that culminates with a
revelation of sorts, Squires later
divided his poems into various
convenient "categories."
The diversity is impressive.
There is the feeling of contin-
ual motion as the lines explode
not on the printed page, but
within the reader and listener.
In many respects this is a
poetry of action. Squires' scenes
are in constant transition: from
Greece we journey to Wyoming,
relocate in Spain, and then drive
to South Dakota. The content
also provides action - fishing,
traveling by car, touring the
continent's museums and ruins.
The concept of motion is en-
hanced further with changing
verb tenses that have no rever-
ence for the dimensions of time
and space. This dynamic qual-
ity supplies great strength and
universality to Squires' writing.
It also, however, imposes an
elusiveness that perhaps is not
otherwise in evidence.
Squires' poetry, as himself,
comes across slightly distant.
Almost as if we were on the
periphery of his material. This
perception of non-involvement
I occasionally feel may be the
result of diversity. His themes
and voices range the spectrum,
defying generalization. In this
reading he addressed himself to
"the highway system in Ame-
rica" (his words), variations on
classical mythology, love, civili-
zation, and the concept of art.
Basically Squires is a tradi-
tionalist in the capital letters,
punctuation sense. Much of the
work is slant rhyme and some-
what syllabic. No attempt is
made to structure or unstruc-
tive ,creativity.- The reader - in
this instance, listener-is forced
to go it alone. No footnoting or

hand-holding, even when it
might reflect how clever the
artist is. I have in mind, spe-
cifically, a variation of a dated
story regarding the caliph and
the storyteller. Were he to stop
repeating the same story of ants
as they move grains, he will to
die. Here is just one example of
Squires as a master. Many of
the poems are so brilliant and
finely wrought that they seem
to be Revere silver.
Someone described his m o s t
recent book, The Light Under
Island, as demonstrating "ma-
ture power." Without trying to
define whatever that exactly is,
it seems appropriate. There is
raw power in "The First Poem"
as a caveman reveals impres-
sions of his boy-child and of a
primitive environ. "Summer Peo-
ple" is one of the civilization
poems. It is almost an allegory,
where a porcupine killedgby
night campers takes on grand
proportions.
"The Wicked Dogs," a person-
al favorite, is another social
commentary. The first half is
naturalistic ; highly sensual.
Part two: the neighbor's tamed
dogs, "fed from tins," ravage a
running doe "reddening t h e i r
muzzles on a full belly." Power.
Maturity is best considered on
a relative scale, if at all. Squires'
possesses a cosmopolitan concept
of his craft and a universe that

can at once be identified with,
and yet, still be foreign. This is
son conspicuous that the poetry
provides strongest testimony.
Perhaps because he realizes
that words are the merest ap-
proximately of emotion, Squires
paradoxically exhibits both a
compression and looseness sim-
ultaneously. He plays games
with language and its implica-
tion, reflecting Dr. Williams'
state of chaos. Unfortunately,
lost in the translation from
creator to stranger - much in
the same respect that Dylan
Thomas requires the same qual-
ities in his readers to be pro-
perlyi appreciated.
Although I've never met t h e
Buddha,,or for that matter any
Buddha, Radcliffe Squires has
the trappings and mannerisms
of some kind of poetry-writing
buddha who resides in some
temple just outside, say, Lara-
mie, Wyoming.
v.

la

Plus
TEN WHEEL DRIVE
OLYMPIA STADIUM
Fri., Feb. 20th, 8:30 P.M.
Tickets: $3.50, 4.50, 5.50 Now
on sale at Olympia Box Office
and All J. L. Hudson's Ticket
Outlets. Mail Orders Send
Self-Addressed Stamped En-
velope and check or Money
Order to Olympia Box Office,
5920 Gr. River, Detroit, Mich.
48208. t

arts festival
The Concept' to play here

"one of the year's most pleasant 8th
m oie experiences. Wime

0i

The Creative Arts Festival is
entering its second week with
a presentation of The Concept
from off-Broadway, this Thurs-
day and Friday. The actors are
all former drug addicts who are
participating in a rehabilitation
project called Daytop. Walter
Kerr of the New York Times
says, "As they begin to act out
the fears and angers that have
enabled them to look at them-
selves through looking openly
at others, we are entirely aware
of their amateur status." But he
goes on to say that it is just
this amateur status and easi-
ness in their roles that allows
the play to come across with
such force. "But I think it nec-
essary to recognize that we are
affected by something controll-
ed, and that the residue of ac-
tuality lingers in the play's raw
reach after conscious shape
does confront us, today, with a
most unfamiliar power."
The Concept is an innovative
production followed by a ques-
tion and answer period. Tick-
ets are $2.75.
Tom Wolfe, author of The
Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test will
be lecturing at 3 p.m. in Hill
Aud. this Sunday. Wolfe is also
a journalist for New York Mag-
azine and a social critic. He is
known for his commentary on
the 'now' generation.
Most history of art depart-
ments across the country are
lacking in the field of African
art says Prof. Clifton Olds of
this University's department.
But Creative Arts has invited
John Biggers to speak on the
topic. Biggers w ill be giving
a slide-lecture in Aud. B at 8:30
p.m. on the 19th. Admission is a
dollar, but isn't education worth
it?
The University of Michigan
Dancers will' be giving a free
performance and demonstration
of modern d a n c e in Barbour

Gym the same day at 7 p.m.
The show is entitled Everyone
Can Dance and to prove it there
will be some audience participa-
tion.
And then of course starts .the
Jazz Festival, which, unfortun-
ately lasts only two dalys. Miles
Davis will start it off on the
20th. Davis is a master of the
art of improvisation in music.
"In a music which is turbulent,
constantly evolving, subject to
whims and fads and exploita-
tion" lies his message - and
the music is all that matters.
Ron Carter, a very unique and
versatile basist, will also be on
stage that evening. Carter play-
ed with Davis's quintet until
very recently.
The following evening Alvin
Batiste, William Fischer and
Cannonball Adderly w ill1 con-
tinue the fest. Batiste is one of
the best modern clarinetists in
America. Writer, composer and
soloist, Batiste is an intense and
serious performer. Fischer was
trained in the classical tradition
and bridges the gap between
Anthropology Club
sponsors:
a BENEFIT for
Simon Fraser
University Defendants
BOB SHEFF and
CARNAL KITCHEN

the black r o o t s in American
music and t h e harmonics of
Europe. Cannonball, who plays
trumpet and sax, gained h i s
nickname from his gigantic ap-
petite. Adderly is presently ex-
perimenting with "Third Stream
Music," using a full orchestra.
And finally the 22nd will be
the opening of a ceramic show
featuring works by John Lorree
from Eastern Michigan Univer-
sity, J. T. Abernathy, Bob Black,
Tom Larkin and John and Suz-
anne Stephenson of Ann Arbor.
The show will be in the Museum
of Art free of charge. Some of
the works will be on sale.

" 'The Reivers' fills one with a
joyous sense of life and laugh-
ter. A -norvelous time is had by
all."-New York Magazine.
StevevMcQueen
"The Reivers

H ELD
OVER!
:: A Great Screen Classic Retrs

VIVIEN LEIGH
and MARION BRANDO

I

in TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'
"A STREETCAR
NAMED DESIR E"
Screen Play by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS . "ased upon the Original Play"A Streetcar Named Desire" by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS
As Presented on the Stage by frne Mayrtelznic . Directed by ELI A KAZAN Re-released thru
Uited Arists8

Treadwel I
Panty Hose
$1 .39/pr.
All sizes
Bikini
Panties
$1 .29-$1 .99
Brushed Nylon
N ightgowns
$1.99 & $2.99
500 E. LIBERTY
769-2612
Open Mondays
'til 9

......-

I

i

i

a
DAVID ACKLES
Elektra Recording Artist
°I heard everything from Jelly Roll Morton to Kurt
Weill and Charles Ives in his piano... fascinating."
-Village Voice, Jan. 8
"Revelation through entertainment" -Cash Box,
Dec. 20
DOORS OPEN 8 P.M.
F RI-SAT-SU N $2.00

"VIVA MAX"

Eventually:

I

---....MM

mmmm

I

Canterbury House
THURS., FEB. 12, 8-12 P.M.
$1 donation per person

I

I

ALL

11

SellI

BACH

... ....

CONCERT

a

41

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN f o r m to
Room 3528 L. S. Ai B I d g ., before
2 p.m., of the day preceding pub-
lication and by 2 p.m. Friday for
Saturday and Sunday. Items ap-
pear once only. Student organiza-
tion notices a r e not accepted for
publication. F o r more informa-
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 12
Day Calendar
Physics Resonance Group L u n c h
Seminar: H. Gould, "Theory of the
Lambda Transition in Helium" P & A
Colloq. Rm., 12 noon.
Professional Theatre Program Phoen-
ix Theatre): Helen Hayes and James
Stewart in Harvey: Lydia Mendelssohn
Theater, 2:30 and 8:00 p.m.
Inst. of Sci.'?and Tech, and Dept. of
Geology and Mineralogy: Dr. John Pat-

ton, Head Indiana Geological Survey,
"Geology, Resources, and the Environ-
ment." Nat. Sci. Aud., 4:00 p.m.
Department of Speech (Student Lab-
oratory Theater): The Mandrake and
Gammer Gurton's Needle: Arena Thea-
ter, Frieze Building, 4:10 p.m.
Religious Affairs Open Seminar: "Per-
sonal Explorations", 2222 SAB, 7:30
P.m.
Creative Arts Festival: The Concept
(direct from Off-Btroadway): Trueblood
Theater, 8:00 p.m.
General Notices
Dept. of Industrial Engineering Sem-
inar: Edmund L. Burke, U. of Pa., "In-
formation Theoretical Aspects of Auto-
mata in the Communications Channel",
Rm. 220 W. Engin., Fri., Feb. 13, 3:00
p.m.
Placement Service
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B.
t Further Info. on these programs is
avail, at Career Planning, 3200 SAB.
School of Journalism, MSU, offers
grad. programs, MA and PhD, fin. aid
avail.
(Continued on Page 8)

POT
in Daily

I

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
CHAMBER CHOIR AND ORCHESTRA
THOMAS H ILBISH, Conductor

MOTET VI

CANTATAS 71 and 198

Classifieds

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 13,8:00 P.M., HILL AUD.

ADMISSION COMPLIMENTARY
h'

Litter doesn't throw
itself away; litter
doesn't just happen.
People cause it-and'
only people can prevent
It. "People" means you.
Keep America Beautiful.
_dvertising contributed
orthe public good

Feb. 12, 13-Thurs., Fri.
LA RONDE
Dir. Max Ophuls (1950)

M

III

THINK
about Students
THINK
about ,the

IL

I

"TWO OF THE YEAR'S BEST!"

"Besides being one of the truely
funny sophisticated comedies, it
starred one of the best looking
chicks ever."-Neal Gabler
"A VEY FUNNY,
IMMENSELY APEALINGMOVIE.
- 4Y wit

-Neal Gabler, Mich. Daily
"A 'beautiful' movie. One of the
finest and most immediate adap-
tations of Shakespeare I have
ever seen."-Neal Gabler
"'DAZZLING"
-LIFE

11

PARAMOUNT PICTURES preavntu
A Bi Fiil
The=
RANCO
ZEFFIRELLI
Produetion of
ROMEO
gjULIET

jj.}-'

I

.. _ ...r . 1

U ~ ~~~~ .r-U A JU K.- nI - flh M~-

.ZI .

Hii

1

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan