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February 10, 1970 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F

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page three

EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY

£ idrltn

ti1

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

presents in concert
THE DAVE BRUBECK TRIO
featuring
GERRY MULLIGAN
FRIDAY, FEB. 20 1 8P.M.
Pease Auditorium, Ypsilanti, Michigan
$3.50/$3.00/$2.50
all seats reserved, tickets available at the E.M.U.
Union or by mail. Send check payable to E.M.U. and
self - addressed envelope to University Activities
Board, E.M.U., McKenny Union, Ypsilanti, Mich-
igan (orders received after Feb. 16 will be held at
box office)
COMING MARCH 22: THREE DOG NIGHT!

Tuesday, February 10, 1970 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three
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Direct from Off-Broadway
Creative Arts Festival presents
The Daylop Theatre Co. in
THE CONCEPT
PSYCHO-DRAMA
' ~OF EX-DRUG,
' ADDICTSI
without question the most
moving theatrical experience
in New York." -Walter
Kerr, New York Times

the
n ews today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service
THE DEMOCRATIC PARTY called for withdrawal of all
U.S. forces from Vietnam within 18 months.
The declaration came at a Washington meeting of the Democratic
Policy Council. The Council, which is headed by former Vice Presi-
dent Hubert Humphrey, also urged President Nixon to immediately
appoint a successor to Henry Cabot Lodge, who resigned last fall as
chief U.S. negotiator at the Paris peace talks.
In addition, the policy council said that U.S. withdrawal should
not depend on progress in peace negotiations, the level of the Vietnam
fighting, or the pace of "Vietnamization"-the gradual assumption of
the U.S. war effort by South Vietnamese troops. These are the three
conditions which Nixon has said he would base his troop withdrawal
decisions on.
*% * *
ATTY. GEN. JOHN N. MITCHELL announced a two-pronged
attack on water pollution in the Chicago area.
In the Nixon administration's first major anti-pollution action,
the government yesterday charged 11 companies with polluting rivers
and waterways. They were accused of dumping various types of wastes,
such as oil and oily substances, into the water.
Mitchell also disclosed a federal grand jury will investigate the
deposit of solid waste materials in the Calumet River and Lake Mich-
igan. The probe marks the first time such a panel has been ordered
to investigate cases of mass pollution.
TWO GENERALS said the Army's high command did not
influence the decision to court-martial Lt. William L. Calley Jr.
Calley has been charged with the massacre of 102 Vietnamese
civilians in the My Lai hamlet in Songmy, South Vietnam in March
1968. Soldiers serving under Calley -at that time have claimed he
ordered them to kill the civilians.
calley's attorneys contended in a pretrial hearings yesterday that
"command influence" filtered down from President Nixon who ad-
mitted in a Dec. 8 press conference that a massacre had accurred
at My Lai.
The U.S. Supreme Court has reversed previous court martial
convictions where "command influence" has been proved.
Maj. Gen. Orwin C. Talbott, the commanding general who ordered
Calley to trial, and Brig. Gen. Oscar E. Davis; Talbott's predecessor,
said they had received no instructions from superior officers regarding
the trial.
ISRAELI AND EGYPTIAN planes continued their struggle
for air supremacy in the Middle East.
For several days the Israelis have attacked the suburbs of Cairo,
Egypt's capital. Egyptian President Gamal Abdel Nasser has admitted
Israel is now stronger in the air because of an Arab pilot shortage.
An Israeli plane was shot down yesterday while four Israeli sol-
diers were killed and -five were wounded in a raid across the Suez
Canal. The Egyptians claimed all their planes returned safely.
The Israelis claimed they downed an Egyptian aircraft. According
to the Israeli count, it was the 67th Egyptian jet shot down since
the 1967, compared to 10 Israeli planes claimed lost.
** *
SOUTH VIETNAMESE FORCES clashed for the fourth
straight day with a North Vietnamese regiment in the Plain of
Reeds, west of Saigon.
The action was aimed at preventing the regiment from reaching
the Mekong Delta.
The scene of yesterday's fighting is the farthest east the regiment
has been spotted since it was first detected late in 1969.
Intelligence sources said there was no firm evidence of the enemy's
intentions but that My Tho, a market city south of Saigon in the
Mekong Delta, was a likely target.
South Vietnamese special forces and rangers, U.S. Green Beret-led
civilian irregulars and mobile strike force troops moved into the area
60 miles west of the capital to reinforce local forces.

WASHINGTON GM - The Nixon administration told con-
tractors and unions in 18 cities yesterday to shape voluntary
plans for boosting minority-group employment on' federal
construction projects or the government will do it for them.
Secretary of Labor George P. Shultz set no timetable,
but a Labor Department spokesman said this means "well
within a year."
The secretary said in a statement the government would
impose "Philadelphia-type plans for those local communities
which are unable to develop on their own initiative acceptable
area-wide agreements."

U.S.

warns

contractors

on

job

-Associated Press
Polluting the water
The Calumet area of East Chicago, Ind., pictured here, has
recently come under attack from Atty. Gen. John Mitchell for
allegedly polluting the rivers and waterways. The government has
charged 11 companies in the area with contributing to the pol-
lution.
BACK STRIKERS:
U students picket
Fruehauf Corp. again

TRUEBLOOD AUDITORIUM
Thurs., Feb. 12-8 P.M.
Fri., Feb. 13-7:15 and 10 P.
TICKETS $2.75-1 st floor Union
Available: M-F 11 -4; Sat. 1 -3
Coming: Sun., Feb. 35
3 P.M., Hill Aud.
TOM WOLFE-Author of
Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test

bias

M.
Dig

fNED'
BOOK.STORE
YPSILAN Tl
This new store carries more trade (non-text) books
than any other in the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.
Unusual 1970 calendars, thousands-of paperbacks,
lots of them used, some hardbacks.
10/ OFF
ONrALL BOOKS
Mon.-Thurs.-9-9; Fri.-9-6; Sat.-12:5:30

Special To The Daily
DETROIT - About 60 Univer-
sity students and workers from
the Ann Arbor area yesterday
joined striking Fruehauf Corp.
workers on the picket line for the
second time since Friday.
There were sporadic incidents
of vandalism and damage to ve-
hicles owned by strike-breaking
workers. There were also two
clashes between police and pick-
eters.
In the second of these clashes,
Robert Quick, the husband of one
of the strikers, was arrested on
charges of violating Itetroit's knife
ordinance, according to the De-
troit Police Department.
Fruehauf technical, clerical and
janitorial workers, about 80 per
cent of whom are women, joined
a United Auto Workers Local in
May.
Since then, negotiations have
failed due to "the repeated refusal
of the company to, in effect, rec-
ognize u n 1o0nrrepresentation,"
claimed Ken Morris, a UAW reg-
ional director. Workers are also
demanding higher wages and bet-
ter working conditions.

Company directors could not be
reached for comment yesterday.
National Labor Relations Board
Regional Director Jerome H.
Brooks, upon hearing complaints
by the UAW, found there w a s
"reasonable cause to believe" the
Fruehauf Corp. had violated fair
labor practices on at least three
counts:
--The company refused to bar-
gain in good faith;
-It granted a wage increase
without consultation with the rec-
ognized bargaining agent;
--It threatened to fire any
worker who went out on strike.
Brooks ordered an examination
before a trial examiner Jan. 20.
No decision has been reached yet..
If Fruehauf is found quilty they
are required by law to bargain in
good faith. If they fail to do that
they can be held in contempt of
court.
About 20 Detroit policemen have.
been patrolling the picket lines in
recent weeks. Earlier in the strike,
helmeted riot police were present.
According to a UAW pamphlet,
police refused earlier in the strike
to press charges against a driver
who his three strikers with his
car.
A meeting will be held by the
local tonight to determine t h e
strike's future.

Under the disputed Philadelphia
Plan, the government set percent-
age goals for specific unions, re-
quiring each to increase minority-
group membership - primarily
blacks - by five per cent a year
for four years.,
Organized labor opposes the
plan, contending it establishes
hiring quotas in violation of 1964
Civil Rights Act.
The 18 named by Shultz are At-
lanta, Boston, Buffalo, Cincinnati,
Denver, Detroit, Houston, Indiana-
polis, Newark, N.J., New Orleans,
New York, San Francisco, Seattle
and St. Louis.
The Office of Federal Contract
Compliance said it would first
focus attention on six priority
cities-Boston, Detroit, Atlanta,
Los Angeles, Seattle and Newark.
"We have made it quite clear
that in solving these problems of
the cities we favor voluntary,
area-wide agreements to the im-
position of specific requirements
by the government," Shultz de-
clared.
"I, therefore, urge contractors,
unions, minority-group organiza-
tions and local officials in these
18 cities to speed development of
area-wide agreements that would
make equal employment in con-
struction work a reality."
Shultz's announcement was in
keeping with the department's po-
licy stated in October that "the
best solution is a hometown solu-
tion." It made clear, however, that
the government is not dropping its
Philadelphia Plan in favor of vol-
untary agreements.
The AFL-CIO -president, George
Meany, asserted in a speech last
month that the plan, originated
in Philadelphia and now being
challenged in the courts by some
contractors, is illegal and will not
work. He called it "a concoction
.to offset the Nixon 'adminis-
tration's bad civil rights record."
An AFL-CIO spokesman said the
labor federation favors voluntary
plans like the one adopted Jan. 12
in Chicago among unions, con-
tractors and civil rights groups.
The Philadelphia Plan applies
only to federally financed con-
struction projects e x c e e d i n g
$500,000.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
.lty year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier. $3.00 by
mail.

Health
"
insurance
plan asked
WASHINGTON (W)-A national
health insurance program under
the Social Security system was
proposed yesterday by Rep.
Martha W. Griffiths (D-Mich).
Mrs. Griffiths, a member of the
House Ways and Means Commit-
tee, said her bill would relieve
state and localgovernments of
health-service tax burdens, es-
timated at about $7 billion a year.
Earlier, a Senate Finance Com-
mittee staff report said Congress
will face great pressure to turni
medicare and medicaid into some
form of national health insurance
unless the rapid increase in med-
ical costs is halted.
The staff report recommended
establishing maximum fees for
doctors under the two government
health programs as one way of re-'
ducing expenses.
Mrs. Griffiths said her proposal
would give to middle-class Amer-
icans the health and medical bene-
fits presently being developed for
the poor and aged, and "which
the wealthy already have simply
because they can afford to pay
for them."
In addition to relieving state
and local governments of expense,
she said her bill would eliminate
medicare and medicaid and the
$10 billion supporting these pro-
grams would become available for
the national health program.
Mrs. Griffiths said the bill would
preserve free choice of physicians
and make it possible for doctors
and dentists to bypass time-con-
suming'business administration.
The cost of a major illness is
such, she said, that nine of ten
Americans are medically indigent
right now.
"H e a 1 t h expenditures n ow
amount to $294 for every man,
woman and child in the nation,"
she said.
Employers would pay -3 per cent
of payroll, employes 1 per cent of
payroll, and the federal govern-
ment would match the employer
contribution from general revenue.
-Health benefits including hos-
pitalization.without limits; physi-
cians services, including surgery,
subject to a $2-a-visit charge after
the first visit, nursing home care
and home health services subject
to a $2-a-visit charge; and

I I I

We think we're interesting-
We hope you will.

GET HIGH
ON THE ENSIAN
Before They're Gone!

CHILD CARE

11

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!----------------
I MICHIGANENSIAN
The University of Michigan
Yearbook'
Just return this card with $7.00
(check or money order payableto
the MICHIGANENSIAN) to the
Student Publications Building, 420
Maynard. A receipt will be sent
within 3 weeks after your order is I
received.
Namee
Ann Arbor Address_
---------- I

(ENTER
SURVEY

The U-M Tutorial Project is
surveying University students,
non-faculty employees and
faculty to determine their
need for child care services.
Please Call 163-3549
Feb. 10-Feb. 13

We're One Year Old

the mini ad
1965 SUPER HAWK. $300, well taken
care of miles. Will sell to highest
offer by Nov. 1. Andy--761-5930. Z2
with maxi power!
Michael!!!
(is here)
2 Homecomings are always better than
one! I love youl lap FF
Read and Use DAILY Classifieds

COME TO THE

MASS MEETING

11

between
9 A.M. and 5 P.M.
or
7 PM. and 9 P.M.
This information
is urgently needed

and

First Anniversary Party
of the

Tenants Union

RADICAL FILM SERIES
PRESENTS
MORGAN
Directed by KAREL REISZ
with VANESSA REDGRAVE*'
DAVID WARNER KING KONG
*"Best Actress" at Cannes Film Festival

.

Find Out What Your Union Has-Accom-
plished In Its First Year and What Lies
Ahead
u ustr niw lA

Michigras

fi . ....

Wednesday
february '11

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