100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 10, 1970 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-02-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Tuesday, February 10, 1970

THE MICHIGAN DAILY Tuesday, February 10,1970

dance

Falco troupe:
Explaining the undefined

WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY-4:10 P.M.
February1 I1th and 12th
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
presents
GAMMER GURTON'S NEEDLE
author anonymous
and
THE MANDRAKE
by Nicolo Macchiavelli
Arena Theatre, Frieze Bldg. Admission Free

q

By ERICA HOFF
Pointed ballet slippers worn
by an entourage of hard study-
ing girls backed by Tchaikovsky
are no longer the choreograph-
er's primary media. Louis Falco
superbly put the art of dance
into a contemporary context in
Sunday's performance at Hill
Aud.
Falco i n c o r p o r a t e s taped
voices and laser beams into his
works without falling into the
omnipresent trap of allowing
technology to dominate the
choreography. His light designs
and human tableau's reinforce
each other as slender red beams
reiterate the dancer's complex
movements,
The first work, Argot, pro-
vided the vehicle for the danc-
ers' individual expression. Jen-
nifer Muller performed human-
ly, emotionally-her dancing is
more than beautiful; it is mean-
ingful. And the portent of Miss
Muller's dancing pervaded the
ballet itself.
Juan Antonio is technically
precise, but his dancing is more
athletic than expressive. Each
,in style
of the Sonata lost in building
momentum for all of the struc-
tural details that Ashkenazy
sought to reveal during the on-
rush of sound.
Schumann's Kreisleriana, writ-
ten in 1838 in honor of one
E. T. A. Hoffman's characters,
alternates brooding melancholy
with brooding frenzy. As in other
Schumann works, there is much
busy activity of dubious intent;
there is also much lyric beauty
and breath-taking rodomontade.
Although Askenazy's perform-
ance was fascinating and ex-
citing in its technical victories,
a certain detachment slightly
vitiated both qualities.
This detachment does not
stem, however, from insensitiv-
ity, but, it would seem, from
the transition of the artist into
a new area of concern.

turn and bit of balance seems
to belong to an acrobat rather
than containing the full hu-
manity that Miss Muller ex-
pressed. However, Antonio per-
formed admirably while main-
taining a distance from the work
and not really contributing to
it.
Falco's choreography demands
more than mere technical abil-
ity of his dancers-it requires
emotional involvement. A slow-
ly timed fall by Miss Muller
against Antonio becomes much
more than a carefully executed
feat. And because the dance
must be a personal expression
by the dancers, the viewer feels
he is watching the very private
interactions of the two people
on stage. The dancers' extended
movements entreat the viewer to
enter this private tour of mind
and body which is purely physi-
cal and, yet, highly sensual.
The choreographical design in
Huescape, the second number,
was more ordered and more
complex. It clearly established
the conflict of the performers
on stage. Falco danced the'role
of a man struggling to choose
between a heterosexual and a
homosexual relationship. But
even in this more structured
work, Falco does not approach
the grand scale design of a
Balanchine ballet. The work is
pefinitely dependent upon each
individual and the manner in
which he so personally relates
to the others on stage with him.
O
N,

Timewright is Falco's largest
production incorporating voices,
lights and laser beams. It is a
drama of life, death and the
inexorable passage of time. The
success of this new combina-
tion in the performing arts is a
tribute to both Falco and his
set director William Katz.
The impact of Timewright is
overwhelming. The cast of six-
larger than in Falco's other
works-allows greater intricacy
in the interplay among the
dancers. The work is emotional-
ly charged though speckled with
humor. The viewer becomes al-
most embarrassed as he watches
a dance of man's most intimate
acts-and yet there is a great
deal of inexplicable understand-
ing.
It is in this production that
the eerie red laser beams swirl
along the patterns of the danc-
ers creating a new dimension in
lighting effects. Miss Muller
dances onto stage late in the
ballet adorned in circlets of
tiny white lights,
But it is the whole group of
dancers working together and
constantly understanding each
other that makes each of the
compositions so overpowering
and yet so sublimely real.
NATIONALGENERALE COPORATIOh
FOX EASTERN TH-EATREIMM'
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"76941300
LAST TIME TODAY
"BOB AND CAROL AND
TED AND ALICE"

dRmw

TONIGHT
at
7-9 P.M.

A Great Screen Classic Returns
* and MARION BRANDO
in TENNESSEE WILLIAMS'
"A STREETCAR
NAMED DESIRE"
Screen Play by TENNESSEE WILLIAMS . Based aPon the original P ay StreetNtameedmoe" by tKtiESSEE WILLIAMS
APresent he StagebyIrcne Meeayarselnick .Directed by RE A KAZAN Re-released thru
S -Unid Ati

NO 2-6264
The Most Explosive Spy

Last 2 Days
SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:05-5:10-7-15-9,20
Scandal of the Century!

Vladimir Ashkenazy: A chan

By R. A. PERRY
Pianist Vladimir Ashkenazy,
who performed last night at Hill
Aud. under the auspices of the
University Musical Society, may,
well be. entering his "middle'
period."
Russian-born Ashkenazy has
always appeared, in his previous
recordings as well as in his last
Ann Arbor appearance two
summers ago, to be a musician
more inclined toward the poetic
line than to a display of power;
to be sure, he had power in
reserve and an especially strong
left hand, but as a general
stylistic tendency, Ashkenazy
went for the singing line rather
than the dramatic proclama-
tion. He was best in those pass-
ages where the melodic line
stands silhouetted against si-
lence; there, with a fine sense
of rubato to create those min-
ute elastic tensions that give
music .the pleasure of expecta-
tion and fulfillment, he placed
each note: as a Jewel in its
setting.
Last night, however, Ashken-

azy seemed more interested in
the structure --- perhaps the
"deep structure" -- of the music
than in its easily recognizable
melodic statements and develop-
ments. He offered the listener
not a chance to be carried on
the music, but, if you will, to
look into the music. Choosing re-
markably "easy" (to the ear, not
pecessary to the hands!) com-
posers such as Chopin and Schu-
mann, Ashkenazy did not pro-
vide the expected cushiony (and
in Schumann lumpy) bed of poe-
try, but a net in which notes
were the'links but the interstic-
es were of larger' import. Thus
one did not stay with or on the
music but fell into it.
Many might disagree with this
brief statement of Ashkenazy's
intent, for the pianist still main-
tained, a high degree of sensual-
ity in Schumann's Kreisleriana
and Chopin's B minor, Op. 58,
No. 3 Sonata. He used the pedal
extensively and in forte allegro
passages achieved not so much a
delineation of furious note se-

quences but a thick sonorous im-
pasto of colors. He went in for
neither pneumatic nor overly-
refined fingering for its o w n
sake, but he also did not go af-
ter the music's heavily-incensed
poetry that the Ashkenazy of
two years ago would have.
Askenazy's new options - if
they indeed indicate a turning
interest-are not necessarily ill-
received, for in the Largo of the
Chopin Sonata, the opening up
of structure and eschewing of
mere lyrical line effected a cer-
tain suspension of time, a cer-
tain Cosmic Pause, that Beet-
hoven practised in, for instance,
the Introduzione movement of
the Waldstein. On the other
hand, the simple Chopin Noc-
turne in E major, Op. 62, No. 2
could not quite bear such a
heady scrutiny, and the Presto
4

BACH CLUB
presents
!'Bach's Music-
An Introduction"
plus
people, food, fun, etc.
EVERYONE INVITED!
Wed. Feb. 11-8 P.M.
1236 WASHTENAW
665-6806 663-2827
663-3819

A UNIVERSAL PICTURE " TECHNCOLOR@

* Starts
Thursday
"GAILY
GAILY"

RI ~ --~~ . . - - -..- -. ~ .-.....___________ i

D
5
R

I

I11

DOUBLE FEATURE BEGINS TOMORROW
BOTH FEATURES ON MICHIGAN DAILY "10 BEST" LIST

,CIII,

I "One of the year's most pleasant

"A VERY FUNNY,
IMMENSELY APEALING MOVIE.
-Vncent Canby, N. Y, Tme

movie experiences."
"'The Reivers' fills one with a
joyous sense of life and laugh-
ter. A marvelous time is had by
al."-New York Magazine.
Steve McQueen
'The Reivers:
E~rn U ~mmu~f~jI

-Time

"DAZZLING"
-LFE
PARAMOUNT PTCf URES lwreenw
FRANCO
ZEFIIRELU
Producalo. of
ejULIET

Feb. 10, 11-Tues., Wed.
American Studies' Films
SUNRISE
dir. F. W. Murnau (1927)

UILD

MUSKET.
ALL CAMPUS THEATRICAL COMPANY
PRESENTS
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
MARCH 10-14th, 1970
s Mail To: MUSKET, Michigan Union, Ann Arbor, Mich. 48104
* (Please enclose a self-addressed stamped envelope) "
* Name _ _ _Phone _
[ Address"
[ I Date Price No. Tickets Amount
" Tuesday, March 10 8:30 p.m. $3.00 $
* Wednesday March 11 8:30 p.m. $3.00
Thursday, March 12 8:30 p.m. $3.00 ._
[ Friday, March 13 7:00 p.m. $3.50_ _
[ Friday, March 13 10:00 p.m. $3.50__
iSaturday, March 14 7:00 p.m. $3.50____
" Saturday, March 14 10:00 p.m. $3.50
" TOTAL ENCLOSED
lI [
" Alternate Date and Time__
"" Mail checks payable to MUSKET I
" No mail orders accepted after February 25, 1q70
' 'TICKETS Wllrl BE MAILED MARCH 1, 1970
I I w w" " " "---" --mr wm -.uu in min m mirw s i n miw msmw m min m U

Janet Gaynor and George
Brien star in silent story
Everyman's temptation and
and redemption. 7:00 P.M.

0'-
of
fall

"Columbus"-7:15 only
"Romeo & Juliet"-9:0 only

PTHPorJM
ends tonite-"FANNY HILL" "X"--7:15, 9:00

..m.ma

lL

wom"

6

I

I

Supermarket Action-ENACT
We have begun leafletting on consumer-
ism and the environment but we need
more help.

Valentine Gift Perfection!
get her
iJhe
IM onogram Circte /in

ALSO
M
dir. Fritz Lang
the director's first talkie
9:00 P.M.
SPECIAL TUESDAY-FREE
11:00 O'clock Showing of
VIRIDIANA
dir. Louis Bunuel (1961)

75c
662-8871

ARCH.
AUD.

NOT CONTINUOUS WITH
"JOHN AND MARY"

I

I
',,,,

1

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

Organiz. Meeting
Tues., Feb. 10-7:30 P.M.
1046 Nat. Resources

lq

I

- r

I

I

the
finest
in
campus fashion

I
i
1
.
i ,
iI
,
I
I
..

CENTER FOR RUSSIAN AND EAST EUROPEAN STUDIES

THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

: . , m w I

presents a lecture
by
U 011 SUPEK

I

Sterling or gold filled with finishes that are
textured or bright in all the popular shapes
and engraved* with your initials, of course.

Professor of Philosophy, University of Zagreb
on

So you've had some trouble
gettin' to us. We understand
but it's really not that hard to
fall for us.

rom 3.75 to

8.00

"Workers' Self-I ianageinent in1 Yuolva

*engraving at no extra charge
but please allow us 48 hours to do the job well

DATE: Tuesday, February 10
TIME: 4:10 P.M.

11

11

I

II

.111111

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan