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January 30, 1970 - Image 10

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1970-01-30

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Ten THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Fridoy, January 30, 1970

leming bars new VP
ntil bylaw agreement
(Continued from Page 1) nition of the nature of OSS which
GC contends that the new vice perpetuates the situation we al-

3000 GATHER:
Protesters disrupt Hayakawa
address at Northeastern U.

#i

president should essentially be an:
administrator of OSS who would!
execute decisions of the policy
board. This, SGC feels, would
make the vice president more re-
sponsive to student views about
the services provided by OSS.
The administration and the Re-
gents, however, maintain that
such a relationship between the
vice president and his policy board
would prevent him from establish-
ing an effective working relation-
ship with the other executive offi-
cers. Fleming has said he considers
such a relationship vital to the
vice president.
In a memorandum accompany-
.ing the regental bylaw draft, the
Regents stated that the revisions
were still subject to the comments
and suggestions of faculty mem-
bers and students.
Fleming has invited SGC and
the Senate Advisory Committee on
University Affairs (SACUA), the
faculty executive committee, to
discuss with both him and the Re-
gents their differences on the by-,
law draft,
In his letter to Nissen and Prof.
Kennedy, Fleming said he would
wait for an agreement to be
reached in the discussions before
naming the new vice president.
"As soon as those discussions
reveal enough agreement on ther
nature of the vice president's po-
sition to accurately describe it to
an appointee, we can move
ahead," he wrote.
SGC President Marty McLaugh-
lin contended yesterday that the
only agreement that would be ac-
ceptable to the Regents would be
to maintain the wording of the
regental bylaw draft.'
"Since this would allow only a
non-binding OSS policy board we
would be forced to accept a defi-

ready have, McLaughlmi said.
The only alternative to this, the
SGC resolution stated, would be to
refuse to agree to the regental
draft, and be forced to accept "an.
indefinite extension of (Acting
Vice President for Student Af-
fairs Barbara) Newell's term in
office."
"The conduct of the overall OSS
and many of its divisions, under
Mrs. Newell, has been at odds with;
the principle of student decision-
making," the resolution added.
In conclusion, the resolution
said the choice between con-!
tinuing the term of Mrs. Newell
and acceptance of the regentall
draft represented "blackmail."
Commenting on SGC's action,
Fleming said last night, "I just
think they're paranoic about the
whole thing."
"They read the regental bylaw
draft without paying attention to
the part which called for com-
ments and discussion of the draft.
They assume that the Regents
have fixed minds. and will not
listen to suggestions," he con-
tinued, adding, "This is not true."
The impending delay in selec-
tion of a vice president reportedly
may force at least two of the can-
didates to withdraw their names.
The two candidates-Alan Gus-
kin, a lecturer in -the psychology
department, and Walter Sherving-
ton, an instructor in the Medical
School-are reported to be consid-
ering offers of positions at other
colleges.
Louis Graff will join the Uni-
versity on Monday as director of
health sciences information. The
appointment was announced by
Michael Radock, vice president for
University relations and develop-
ment.

By The Associated Press
B OS T O N - Demonstrators,
shouting obscenties and waving
Viet Cong flags, smashed windows
at Northeastern University here
when San Francisco State College
President S. I. Hayakawa spoke
last night.
Police cleared the area and
Hayakawa delivered his speech. A
crowd of 1,300 persons was in the
auditorium, and some 3,000 milled
around outside.
Five policemen and one demon-
strator were reported injured.
Members of the university's
chapter of Students for a Demo-
cratic Society had said earlier
Ad board to
hear proposal
p
The administrative board of the
literary college will meet at 3 p.m.
today to hear a key proposal to in-
crease student participation in
LSA decision-making.
The proposal calls for parity
representation of students on the
board, a parity role for students
in hearing boards for academic
discipline, and creation of an all-
student judiciary to handle non-
academic discipline.
The LSA Student Assembly,
which offered the proposal, has'
urged students to attend the meet-
ing and express their opinions on
the plan.
The board will meet in 1017
Angell Hall.

that Hayakawa would not be al-
lowed to speak, and the university
had obtained a court order pre-
venting demonstrations.
Northeastern is one of the larg-
est private universities in the '
United States, with an enrollment!
of more than 40,000. Scuffling
broke out about the time Haya-
kawa began speaking
Protesters, moving to the side-
walks in front of the building,
chanted "pigs out, people in,"
"Two, four, six, eight, organize to
smash the state," and "Ho ho ho,
Ho Chi Minh the N-F-L is going
to win."
Fighting broke out on the steps
of the building which houses ad-
ministrative offices as well as the
auditorium.
Some 40 policemen moved for-
ward pushing the crowd from the
steps. They were the targets ofI
rocks, bricks and other missiles. As
the police moved forward, some
in the front ranks of the crowd
fell. They were picked up bodily
by the police.
The building's lounge was litter-
ed with glass from broken win-
'dows.
Meanwhile in Detroit.a group of!
100-150 students last night con-
tinued to peacefully occupy the
University of Detroit Administra-
tion Building for the third straight
night.
The students began their sit-in
Tuesday morning, according to
protest leaders, to demonstrate
their right to protest peacefully
and to back a list of demands aris-
ing out of a sit-in last week at
which 17 students were arrested.
- - _ _ -E

Last night, students of t h e f l' ) ) ' J",JI °R: 1WI
university's School of Architec- Vt7 L,;I ,
ture announced their intention to :* d';'
boycott classes for an indefinite
amount of time in support of the
protesters. They are the first
group to officially support the de. I
monstration.
Father Malcolm Carron, S.J., . p4'!
president of the Jesuit-run uni-
versity, last night issued a state-
ment at a meeting with repre-
sentatives of the protesters. The
statement, which called for a res-
toration of "peace and calm," was 4;
later printed up and distributed to
the demonstrators.

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FOR THIS SUMMER

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See the "M" World's Fair Chinese Booth
TRADITIONAL PAINTING '
DEMONSTRATION _
with ALAN KWAN, Chinese Artist
Michigan Union, 2nd Floor
f riday, ian. 30, 3-4,1-8 P.M.
Saturday, Jan. 31,3-4,6:30-1:30, 8:30-9:30 P.M.
Paintings will be sold

HELP CELEBRATE
VALENTINE'S DAY
AT
Greenbrier Clubhouse

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BOBBY SEALE: bound and gagged. WHERE IS JUSTICE? Clark and Hamp-
ton: killed. Hadn't Nixon pledged "Freedom from Fear"? When the rights
of others are taken away, they can be taken from us, too.

The Conference on Repression is presenting

sq

U

d

TEACH-IN

SAT., JAN. 31-7:30 P.M.

HILL AUDITORIUM

DAVID HILLIARD
Chief-of-staff, Black Panther Party. David Hilliard is the highest ranking Panther still
free.
EDWARD CROWTHER
Historian of Repression of Social Movements. Crowther was once head Episcopal bishop.
of South Africa. After leaving the country to attend an international peace conference,
he was refused readmission for his active support of the black liberation movement in
South Africa.,
Y/
ARTHUR KINOY
Kinoy is an expert on political trials. He has defended Jerry Rubin before HUAC, is a
law partner with William Kuntzler, Chicago-Conspiracy lawyer, and is professor of law
at Rutgers. Kinoy is also an active member of the National Lawyers Guild.
Jerry is a leader of Youth International Party. He is now being "tried," along with the
rest of the "Conspiracy 7," for violation of the federal anti-riot act at the 1968 Chi-
cago Democratic Convention. Jerry is author of the book "Do It!"

WORKSHOPS
SATURDAY NIGHT (beginning after last speech in Hill Aud.)
1. REPRESSION IN THE MILITARY
LEADER: ANDY STAPP,'American Servicemen's Union
10O25 Angell Hall
2. REPRESSION OF RADICAL LABOR
LEADER: JOHN WATSON, Detroit Revolutionary Union Movement
Auditorium B
3. REPRESSION OF WOMEN
LEADER: WOMEN'S LIBERATION
Auditorium C
4. URBAN REPRESSION
LEADER: DETROIT AD-HOC ACTION GROUP
1035 Angell Hall

!

5. TH EMASS MEDIA AND
LEADER:

REPRESSION
BILL WEISS, National PAR
' 231 Angell Hall

6. WELFARE AS REPRESSION
LEADER: KATE EMERSON, Welfare Rights Committee
Auditorium D
SUNDAY AFTERNOON-2 P.M. TO 4 P.M.
1. POLITICAL ORGANIZING AND POLITICAL TRIALS
LEADER: CONSPIRACY STAFF MEMBER
Auditorium D
2. LEGAL SELF-DEFENSE
LEADER: STAFF OF "THE SECOND COMING"
231 Angel Hal
3. REPRESSION OF NEW CULTURE
LEADER: YOUTH INTERNATIONAL PARTY
(Room number to Fe announced later)
4. THE WAR ON THE BLACK STRU' GLE
LEADER: KEN COCKRfL and the BLACK BERETS
AAditH:Eum C
5. THE DRAFT AS .REPRESSION
s AnI -AI}NAP'-("P Ki FW A.AflR

4

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